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Old 06-27-2013, 03:11 PM   #1
Brent L. Brent L. is online now
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Default Is it fine to have a 3D plasma over a fireplace?

We are looking into buying our first home. I know we shouldn't base such a decision entirely around something like this but it is at least important to me to a certain extent. In the living room there are two places to place our 50'' 3D plasma. Over the fireplace here...



Or on the complete opposite side of the room that you can sorta see part of the wall in this picture from an image of the kitchen...



Would heat from the fireplace when in use even be safe? Would having the TV up that much higher screw up the 3D effect? Just looking for advice, thanks!
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Old 06-27-2013, 04:06 PM   #2
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My answer would be NO! Do not mount it over the fireplace.
There are too many variables to consider. The thing that would bother me is the danger of hitting something that vents the smoke from the fireplace (forget what its called). But it looks like there are some outlets there already. Maybe the last guy had his mounted there??? So that might not be an issue. Are there studs in that area of the wall? Is there someplace to run your wires?
Is my neck going to hurt from constantly looking up at the screen?!
Finally, I like to keep my electronics cool. Therefore, heat radiating from a fireplace will def be a bad environment. Especially for plasma's which tend to run hot.
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Old 06-27-2013, 04:36 PM   #3
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If you are thinking of having a house built vs pre-existing you could do what I did and ask the builder to place the fireplace on a different wall. If you look at this pic from my room the fireplace in the original building plans was to be built where my HT system is located and I asked them to place it on the side wall instead. Pardon the mess but I was in the middle of an upgrade at the time.







I think 3D would not work well with the TV over the fireplace. Most TVs over a fireplace is more of a fashion statement rather than a practical solution.
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Old 06-27-2013, 05:18 PM   #4
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So... is this a wood-burning fireplace, or a gas-log firplace? That might help determine your level of comfort based on the smoke issue.

If it is a wood-burning fireplace, no matter how careful you are, you are guaranteed to get smoke in your TV at some point. That would be a 100% no go IMHO.

If it is a gas-log fieplace, you might be fine. Generally, the area above the fireplace will not get too hot. IIRC, building codes ensure that this area is well-protected against heat. If not, your house would be in danger of burning down, no?

With that being said, heat rises, so you might be allowing heat to rise up to your TV. That really comes down to your preference for your electronics.

Rule of thumb: There are two things that kill electronics... dust and heat.
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Old 06-27-2013, 05:25 PM   #5
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Thanks guys, you pretty much confirmed my concerns. It is indeed a wood burning fireplace, so I assumed it was a bad idea but I just wanted to make sure. Regardless of the heat issue, I'd rather not have it on the wall period, much less above a fireplace. I essentially just wanted to have my worries confirmed.

To be honest, if it was up to me, I wouldn't have a fireplace in the first place if it wasn't already there. They are nice, but they just take up space to me. Also, living where I am in SC, they are very rarely useful anyway.
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Old 06-27-2013, 06:43 PM   #6
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As others have said, the heat is probably a minor concern - perhaps if the fireplace is expected to be used often, one to consider.

The bigger issue is viewing comfort. Most of these over-fireplace install locations place the display way too high. Put it on the other wall if at all possible and you can make the furniture work.

And second the suggestion, if you're building, to have the builder move the fireplace to a less-disruptive location, or to the corner. The idea of the "fireplace as focus point" is an impractical design for modern times...
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Old 06-28-2013, 12:47 AM   #7
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I've always been an advocate of having your TV at eye level for the best viewing experience. With that being said, I was forced to mount my TV above the fireplace because it was the only logical location, based on the furniture I had. I'm using a tilt mount I got from Monoprice and the viewing angle is way more comfortable than having the TV at eye level. Having the TV where it is, I can literally lean back on my couch, put my feet up, and have my head in a comfortable location. If I had the TV at eye level, I would have to sit up straight all the time. Just food for thought.

I never used my fireplace this last winter so I don't have any input on how a fire would affect the TV.
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Old 06-28-2013, 03:34 AM   #8
AmishParadise AmishParadise is offline
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Possible heat and height issues aside, I personally would not even consider it. Placing your display over the fireplace there is going to limit you. You've got a door just to the left and a window just to the right of the fireplace. What are your plans for sound? Placing the display on the adjacent wall would provide for far greater flexibility as you'd have plenty of room for a proper front sound stage. The display itself could still be wall mounted of course, but on that adjacent wall you'd also have the option of just going with an A/V stand if you wanted. The adjacent wall would also provide a better vantage point from the kitchen and in the future if you wanted to go with a larger display you wouldn't be limited as you would be having it over the fireplace.

Last edited by AmishParadise; 06-28-2013 at 03:45 AM.
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Old 06-28-2013, 04:11 AM   #9
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Old 06-29-2013, 07:42 PM   #10
joeleeav joeleeav is offline
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Default The conventional wisdom about fireplace mounted TV's is wrong!

Letís clear the air about fireplaces, TVís, uncomfortable viewing heights, and heat. I know there are a lot of bloggers, homeowners and even custom installation companies saying that you shouldn't mount TV's above fireplaces. Let's take a step back and consider what we all know.

People often place pictures, mementos, and even flowers on their mantles,. This morning I saw a fireplace mantle with candles of various sizes on the Houzz website. People also hang mirrors and framed pictures above fireplaces with or without mantles. Many fireplaces just have drywall above. No worry about heat, right?

As the owner of a high end custom home theater design, integration, installation, and service company for 34 years, I have a great deal of experience mounting TVís above fireplaces. After all, thatís the way the seating faces in most homes. I have seldom seen people actually using their fireplaces, let along lighting fires while watching TV. Besides, when TV's are mounted on walls other than the fireplace wall, the reflection of the fire on the TV screen is very disruptive.

Fireplaces are designed to draw heat and smoke up the chimney and not into the room. A smaller portion of the heat from a fireplace radiates forward into the room (not a terribly efficient way to heat a room). You won't find much heat concentrated on the wall above the fireplace, but rather forward some distance. By the way, if your fireplace is sending smoke into the room, it is also sending toxic carbon dioxide and carcinogenetic ash your way. Have a professional examine it at once.

There is, however, a reason home theater designers will discourage their clients from fireplace-mounted TVís. I did that myself when I was still running my installation company. Itís because of the viewing angle, not because of heat concerns. TVís mounted over fireplaces are usually much too high for comfortable viewing. Itís not supposed to hurt to watch television Ė certainly not when all of us spend way too much of our free time parked in front of it.

Whatís changed in the past year thatís dramatically solved this problem is the availability of television mounts that lower the TV. If the ideal mounting position is too high for comfortable viewing, there are three companies manufacturing mounts that can move your TV down to a comfortable viewing height. One is manual, with capacities up to 110 lbs, one is motorized, with a drop of 13Ē, and the last is also motorized, designed for TVís up to 90Ē, with a capacity of 190 lbs. With these mounts, you would not be using your fireplace because, among other things, your TV would block the fire. And in this case, thatís a good thing.

With regard to how high to place a TV above a fireplace, where there is no mantle, Iíve mounted TV's one or two feet above the firebox with no issues. Where there is a mantle, you can mount the TV anywhere it looks balanced to you. In either case you can investigate a manual or motorized fireplace TV mount that will bring it down to a comfortable viewing position.

And to put your mind at ease about the heat issue, try lighting a fire and placing your hand where you would like to mount your TV to determine if there is any heat present. A little bit of warmth is OK. Iíve never heard of a TV failing from excessive heat in a house in the desert, where the temperature is often above 100 degrees. Use your own common sense considering above the fireplace TV mounting and donít just accept conventional wisdom thatís inaccurate.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:05 PM   #11
Skulltap Skulltap is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeleeav View Post
Letís clear the air about fireplaces, TVís, uncomfortable viewing heights, and heat. I know there are a lot of bloggers, homeowners and even custom installation companies saying that you shouldn't mount TV's above fireplaces. Let's take a step back and consider what we all know.

People often place pictures, mementos, and even flowers on their mantles,. This morning I saw a fireplace mantle with candles of various sizes on the Houzz website. People also hang mirrors and framed pictures above fireplaces with or without mantles. Many fireplaces just have drywall above. No worry about heat, right?

As the owner of a high end custom home theater design, integration, installation, and service company for 34 years, I have a great deal of experience mounting TVís above fireplaces. After all, thatís the way the seating faces in most homes. I have seldom seen people actually using their fireplaces, let along lighting fires while watching TV. Besides, when TV's are mounted on walls other than the fireplace wall, the reflection of the fire on the TV screen is very disruptive.

Fireplaces are designed to draw heat and smoke up the chimney and not into the room. A smaller portion of the heat from a fireplace radiates forward into the room (not a terribly efficient way to heat a room). You won't find much heat concentrated on the wall above the fireplace, but rather forward some distance. By the way, if your fireplace is sending smoke into the room, it is also sending toxic carbon dioxide and carcinogenetic ash your way. Have a professional examine it at once.

There is, however, a reason home theater designers will discourage their clients from fireplace-mounted TVís. I did that myself when I was still running my installation company. Itís because of the viewing angle, not because of heat concerns. TVís mounted over fireplaces are usually much too high for comfortable viewing. Itís not supposed to hurt to watch television Ė certainly not when all of us spend way too much of our free time parked in front of it.

Whatís changed in the past year thatís dramatically solved this problem is the availability of television mounts that lower the TV. If the ideal mounting position is too high for comfortable viewing, there are three companies manufacturing mounts that can move your TV down to a comfortable viewing height. One is manual, with capacities up to 110 lbs, one is motorized, with a drop of 13Ē, and the last is also motorized, designed for TVís up to 90Ē, with a capacity of 190 lbs. With these mounts, you would not be using your fireplace because, among other things, your TV would block the fire. And in this case, thatís a good thing.

With regard to how high to place a TV above a fireplace, where there is no mantle, Iíve mounted TV's one or two feet above the firebox with no issues. Where there is a mantle, you can mount the TV anywhere it looks balanced to you. In either case you can investigate a manual or motorized fireplace TV mount that will bring it down to a comfortable viewing position.

And to put your mind at ease about the heat issue, try lighting a fire and placing your hand where you would like to mount your TV to determine if there is any heat present. A little bit of warmth is OK. Iíve never heard of a TV failing from excessive heat in a house in the desert, where the temperature is often above 100 degrees. Use your own common sense considering above the fireplace TV mounting and donít just accept conventional wisdom thatís inaccurate.

And, respectfully, as the owner of a home with a wood-burning fireplace, I can confirm from actual experience that maintaining your fire (unless you are okay with it going out) will absolutely 100% of the time result in some smoke not going straight up the chimney. I have professionals inspect my fireplace in its entirety on an annual basis, and this is not due to any faults. I have lived in homes with wood-burning stoves and/or fireplaces for 37 years. I feel like that's a good amount of experience to judge that.

And avoiding excess heat and dust is a very common practice for people who own electronics. I am assuming those homes in the "100 degree desert" are not devoid of A/C... perhaps I assume too much?

I am not dismissing your observations, but there are other valid ones to be shared.
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Old 09-04-2013, 01:52 PM   #12
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Taken from:

http://www.thx.com/test-bench-blog/t...eplace-yes-no/

THX Tech Tip: Hanging your TV above the Fireplace? Yes, No?



It seems like every time you turn on a cable channel, some design expert wearing leather pants and purple rimmed glasses is hanging a beautiful new flat panel TV high on a wall above a fireplace. While this might be aesthetically pleasing to an interior designer, it is not always the best advice for maximizing your viewing experience.


When mounting your new TV at home, think about the appropriate viewing angle. If you mount the TV too high on a wall, you will be constantly looking up to watch the programming, just like sitting in the front row of a movie theater. If itís too low, you will be constantly looking down at the screen.





The experts at THX believe that you should have a clean line of sight to the display, without looking up more than 15 degrees or down more than 7 degrees. In a dedicated home theater, a good rule of thumb is to mount your TV in a direct line of sight from the primary seating positions. It should be high enough so those sitting behind you can see over or between those sitting in the front row.


Do it right, and TV mounting wonít be a pain in your neck.
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