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Old 01-16-2011, 04:39 PM   #1
U4K61 U4K61 is offline
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El amor es invisible y entra y sale por donde quiere, sin que nadie le pida cuenta de sus hechos.


To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles


Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.


No, I don't think so; no. Mr. Kane was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe Rosebud was something he couldn't get, or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn't have explained anything... I don't think any word can explain a man's life. No, I guess Rosebud is just a... piece in a jigsaw puzzle... a missing piece.


Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn

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Old 01-16-2011, 05:16 PM   #2
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Well, in a thread on Great Classics, I must mention Great Expectations


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Old 01-16-2011, 06:03 PM   #3
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How it is I know not; but there is no place like a bed for confidential disclosures between friends. Man and wife, they say, there open the very bottom of their souls to each other; and some old couples often lie and chat over old times till nearly morning.


Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee. Sink all coffins and all hearses to one common pool! and since neither can be mine, let me then tow to pieces, while still chasing thee, though tied to thee, thou damned whale! Thus, I give up the spear!


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Old 01-16-2011, 06:25 PM   #4
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20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and The Mysterious Island. Great reading.
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Old 01-16-2011, 08:16 PM   #5
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I became obsessed with Dumas years ago when I worked at a ski resort and had long bus rides twice a day. I tore through "The Count of Monte Cristo", "The Three Musketeers", and "The Man in the Iron Mask". My favorite of those three is:
"Take life as it comes. Run when you have to, fight when you must, rest when you can." ~WoT~

Books I'm currently reading
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:49 PM   #6
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First time I read it, and I really enjoyed it!
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Old 01-20-2011, 06:05 PM   #7
Gaius Marius Gaius Marius is offline
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No thread on classics should be without the Illiad and Odyssey Both excellent stories that are still thrilling today. Forget the Hollywood adaptation of "Troy", Homer still tells the better story.
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Old 05-28-2011, 05:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BluLobsta View Post
Well, in a thread on Great Classics, I must mention Great Expectations
[Show spoiler]


Will have to see if the local library has it. Almost forgot about that one.
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Old 06-02-2011, 02:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaius Marius View Post
No thread on classics should be without the Illiad and Odyssey Both excellent stories that are still thrilling today. Forget the Hollywood adaptation of "Troy", Homer still tells the better story.
I believe you mean whoever wrote down what Homer said tells the better story...Homer certainly wasn't writing anything himself, and I don't think they bothered to mic public speakers in Ancient Greece.
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Old 09-19-2011, 12:44 PM   #10
BohemianGraham BohemianGraham is offline
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1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
6. 1984, by George Orwell
7. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
8. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
9. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
10. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
11. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
12. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
13. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
14. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
15. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
16. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
17. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
18. The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner
19. A Room with a View - E.M. Forster
20. Howard's End - E.M. Forster
21. Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
22. Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
23 & 24. Huckleberry Fin & Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
25. The Chronicles of Narnia
26. Pretty much everything else by vonnegut I haven't listed yet
27. Billy Budd, Sailor - Herman Melville
28. All of the Sherlock Holmes novels/short story collections by Arthur Conan Doyle
29. Anything by Lucy Maud Montgomery. She wrote so much more than Anne, and I still read her books at least once a year.
30. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Emmuska Orczy

I have way more, I'll list them later.
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Old 09-19-2011, 01:16 PM   #11
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Siddhartha by Herman Hesse should be read by everyone at least once in there lifetime (why the hell can't hollywood make a decent adaptation of this novel?).
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:32 PM   #12
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El Ingenioso Hidalgo de Don Quijote de la Mancha
Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)



"her name is Dulcinea, her country El Toboso, a village of La Mancha, her rank must be at least that of a princess, since she is my queen and lady, and her beauty superhuman, since all the impossible and fanciful attributes of beauty which the poets apply to their ladies are verified in her; for her hairs are gold, her forehead Elysian fields, her eyebrows rainbows, her eyes suns, her cheeks roses, her lips coral, her teeth pearls, her neck alabaster, her bosom marble, her hands ivory, her fairness snow, and what modesty conceals from sight such, I think and imagine, as rational reflection can only extol, not compare."


La razón de la sinrazón
mi razón enflaquece.


Que trata de la condición y ejercicio del famoso hidalgo D. Quijote de la Mancha
In the village is a tall, gaunt-featured quiet country gentleman nearing 50, un hidalgo who is named Alonso Quixano. He shared his hacienda with his criada and sobrina. He has a small library at home cantaining about a hundred works on chivalry; aventuras de los caballeros andantes which he read "with such ardour and avidity that he almost entirely neglected the management of his property". He fell "for their lucidity of style and complicated conceits [which] were as pearls in his sight"; passages like "the reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty;" Love and adventure fill his deluded mind as he decides to revive knight-errantry "for the support of his own honour as for the service of his country, that he should make a knight-errant of himself, roaming the world over in full armour and on horseback in quest of adventures, and putting in practice himself all that he had read of as being the usual practices of knights-errant; righting every kind of wrong, and exposing himself to peril and danger from which, in the issue, he was to reap eternal renown and fame."

"¡Oh, princesa Dulcinea, señora de este cautivo corazón! Mucho agravio me habedes fecho en despedirme y reprocharme con el riguroso afincamiento de mandarme no parecer ante la vuestra fermosura. Plégaos, señora, de membraros de este vuestro sujeto corazón, que tantas cuitas por vuestro amor padece."
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:37 PM   #13
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La Primera Salida


He cleans up some old armour that had belonged to his bisabuelos that had been "forgotten in a corner [that was] eaten with rust and covered with mildew... [having] one great defect in it, that it had no closed helmet". So "he contrived a kind of half-helmet of pasteboard which, fitted on to the morion, looked like a whole one". After refurbishing his armour, he anounces "'I am the giant Caraculiambro, lord of the island of Malindrania, vanquished in single combat by the never sufficiently extolled knight Don Quixote of La Mancha, who has commanded me to present myself before your Grace, that your Highness dispose of me at your pleasure'?" He ventures out to his cuadra and names his old horse, a barn nag who was 'flaco y enfermizo', Rocinante. His lady love, a local labradora named Aldonza Lorenzo that he has never met is renamed Dulcinea del Toboso. For her he rides out into Spain looking for adventure to defend the helpless and destroy the wicked.

Que trata de la primera salida que de su tierra hizo el ingenioso D. Quijote
"He donned his suit of armour, mounted Rocinante with his patched-up helmet on, braced his buckler, took his lance, and by the back door of the yard sallied forth upon the plain in the highest contentment and satisfaction at seeing with what ease he had made a beginning with his grand purpose." He soon realises, however, that he must first be dubbed a knight before he can bear arms. After a slow daylong ride in scorching heat that had "such fervour that it was enough to melt his brains if he had any", he stops at a venta by night-fall which he thinks is a castle with four guilded turrets topped off with silver. He is greated at the inn by two gay damsels whom he perceives as fair maidens taking their ease at the gate. He raises his pasteboard visor to address them. "Your ladyships need not fly or fear any rudeness, for that it belongs not to the order of knighthood which I profess to offer to anyone, much less to highborn maidens as your appearance proclaims you to be." They began laugh, which left the knight indignant. "Modesty becomes the fair, and moreover laughter that has little cause is great silliness; this, however, I say not to pain or anger you, for my desire is none other than to serve you."

—¡Oh tú, atrevido caballero!
–dijo don Quijote–
¡No toques esas armas o te mataré!

He spends the night watching over his mismatched armour that he has placed on a pilón de agua and attacks a carrier who tries to move it to water his mules. Quixote's wrath was kindled and uttered "O thou, whoever thou art, rash knight that comest to lay hands on the armour of the most valorous errant that ever girt on sword, have a care what thou dost; touch it not unless thou wouldst lay down thy life as the penalty of thy rashness." He "lifted his lance with both hands and with it smote such a blow on the carrier's head that he stretched him on the ground, so stunned that had he followed it up with a second there would have been no need of a surgeon to cure him." In like manor, he attacked a second unknowing carrier. The onlookers addressed Don Quixote with a shower of stones, who screened himself as best he could with his buckler. To get rid of the madman, the innkeeper plays into his insanity and dubs the cavalier a knight with a wooden spoon and sends him on his way. He does not pay, but the innkeeper recomends that in the future he take along money and the usual requirements.

De lo que le sucedió a nuestro caballero cuando salió de la venta
On his return trip home, the redresser of wrongs and abuses hears "the feeble cries" of a farm boy being lashed with a belt by his master for not tending well their flock of sheep. Seeing what was going on, Don Quixote said in an angry voice, "Discourteous knight, it ill becomes you to assail one who cannot defend himself; mount your steed and take your lance". He has him untied, and demands that he gets the nine months at seven reals per month as the wages he is owed. After his discourse, "he gave Rocinante the spur and was soon out of reach. The farmer followed him with his eyes, and when he saw that he had cleared the wood and was no longer in sight, he turned to his boy Andres, and said, "Come here, my son, I want to pay you what I owe you, as that undoer of wrongs has commanded me." "and seizing him by the arm, he tied him up again, and gave him such a flogging that he left him for dead."

Later, he comes to a four way fork in the road and has his horse take the lead. He meets six Toledo traders, four mounted servants and three muleteers, all on their way to buy silk at Murcia. He plants himself in the middle of the road. "All the world stand, unless all the world confess that in all the world there is no maiden fairer than the Empress of La Mancha, the peerless Dulcinea del Toboso." "Sir Knight, we do not know who this good lady is that you speak of..." "If I were to show her to you," replied Don Quixote, "what merit would you have in confessing a truth so manifest..." His wrath aroused, he levelled his lance against the one who had uttered the blasphemy. But midway through the charge, his horse falls and he goes to the ground shattering his lance. One of the muleteers runs up to him and beats him with the splinters. "but the muleteers blood was up, and he did not care to drop the game until he had vented the rest of his wrath, and gathering up the remaining fragments of the lance he finished with a discharge upon the unhappy victim... And yet [Quixote] esteemed himself fortunate, as it seemed to him that this was a regular knight-errant's mishap, and entirely, he considered, the fault of his horse."

¿Donde estáis, señora mía,
que no te duele mi mal?
O no lo sabes, señora,
o eres falsa y desleal...
Oh noble marquás de Mantua,
mi tío y señor Carnal.

He is found and returned to his home at nightfall by a peasant neighbour of his, Pedro Alonso who had been with a load of wheat to the mill. While he slept, Don Quixote’s friends, the curate, Senor Licentiate Pero Perez and the barber, Master Nicholas discuss the matter. The housekeeper erupts in a loud voice: "What does your worship think can have befallen my master?" to which the curate replies, "it is three days now since anything has been seen of him, or the hack, or the buckler, lance, or armour. Miserable me! I am certain of it, and it is as true as that I was born to die, that these accursed books of chivalry he has, and has got into the way of reading so constantly, have upset his reason; for now I remember having often heard him saying to himself that he would turn knight-errant and go all over the world in quest of adventures. To the devil and Barabbas with such books, that have brought to ruin in this way the finest understanding there was in all La Mancha!" The curate askes the niece for the keys to the room. They enter the library and after careful review, save for a few, throw his books one by one out the window into the yard.
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:39 PM   #14
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La Segunda Salida


Confined to his quarters, the mad Quixote went on shouting, raving, and slashing. At nightfall, the houseekper commissioned the books to the flames. "One of the remedies which the curate and the barber immediately applied to their friend's disorder was to wall up and plaster the room where the books were, so that when he got up he should not find them... Two days later Don Quixote got up, and the first thing he did was to go and look at his books, and not finding the room where he had left it, he wandered from side to side looking for it. He came to the place where the door used to be, and tried it with his hands, and turned and twisted his eyes in every direction." The housekeeper explained to her master that it was the devel that carried all away, while the niece insisted to her uncle that it was magician who came on a cloud one night. For Quixote, it was the work of an enchanter.

Over 15 days of relative quite on his part, Quixote explains to the curate and barbor that knights-errant were what the world stood most in need of, and that in him was to be accomplished the revival of knight-errantry. Meanwhile he convinced his neighbour, Sancho Panza to be his escudero or squire. He is short, pudgy, with "very little wit in his pate" yet honest. He is told how adventure can win him governorship of an isle in the twinkling of an eye. The promise of riches gets him to pick-up and leave his wife and children. He accompanies his master on his mule, Dapple, taking along his alforjas and bota.

La imaginada aventura de los molinos de viento
They come within sight of thirty to forty windmills which he mistakes for giants. Sancho tries his best to convince his master of the reality over his insanity, "Look, your worship," said Sancho; "what we see there are not giants but windmills, and what seem to be their arms are the sails that turned by the wind make the millstone go." "It is easy to see," replied Quixote, "that thou art not used to this business of adventures; those are giants; and if thou art afraid, away with thee out of this and betake thyself to prayer while I engage them in fierce and unequal. So "He gave the spur to his steed Rocinante" went charging on at full gallop, shattered his lance in the sail, and he, horse and rider, went rolling over on the ground. Saddened over his loss more then any discomfort from the fall, he took solace in the tale of the spanish knight, Diego Perez de Vargas, who after breaking his sword, tore a bough from an oak and won many victories against the Moors. Quixote did the same and replaced his broken lance with a tree branch.

La estupenda batalla que el gallardo vizcaíno y el valiente manchego tuvieron
They returned to the road they had set out which lead to Puerto Lapice and encountered two friars of St. Benedict mounted on dromedaries. Behind was a coach carying a Biscay lady on her way to Seville which was attended by four or five persons on horseback and two muleteers on foot. But to Quixote they were black bodies carrying off some stolen princess - a wrong that had to be undone. Posting himself in the middle of the road, he demands they release instantly the highborn princesses. He charges the first friar. The other "drove his heels into his castle of a mule and made off across the country faster than the wind." The first jumps to the ground, and sancho tries to strip off his clothes. He he is attacked by the friar's muleteers, kicked and beaten, and left sensless on the ground. A Biscayan squire presses the caballero to leave but instead throws is lance to the ground and draws his sword. The squire draws his sword, pulls a cushion from the coach to act as a shield, and deliveres a powerful blow carying away part of Quixote's helmet and splitting his ear. "Had not the sword turned in its course, that single stroke would have sufficed to put an end to the bitter struggle and to all the adventures of our knight." Quixote's return blow, tempered by the cushion, leaves him bleeding from nose, mouth, and ears. "and the mule, taking fright at the terrible blow, made off across the plain, and with a few plunges flung its master to the ground." Quixote runs up and spares him on his promise that he present himself to the peerless lady Dulcinea del Toboso. After the battle, Sancho holds the stirrup and helps him mount, goes to his knees, kisses his hand, and requests his governorship. Quixote replies, "Thou must take notice, brother Sancho, that this adventure and those like it are not adventures of islands, but of cross-roads, in which nothing is got except a broken head or an ear the less". He offers to care for Don Quixote’s bleeding ear and he is told about the redoma del bálsamo de Fierabrás" with which one need have no fear of death, or dread dying of any wound".

La desgraciada aventura que se topó Don Quijote en topar con unos desalmados yangüeses
"They came to a halt in a glade covered with tender grass, beside which ran a pleasant cool stream that invited and compelled them to pass there the hours of the noontide heat." It happened that in the same valley there was a drove of Galician ponies belonging to Yanguesan carriers. "Rocinante took a fancy to disport himself with their ladyships the ponies, ...got up a briskish little trot and hastened to make known his wishes to them. [They] received him with their heels and teeth to such effect that they soon broke his girths and left him naked without a saddle... The carriers, seeing the violence came running up armed with stakes, and so belaboured him that they brought him sorely battered to the ground." Don Quixote and Sancho, who had witnessed the drubbing of Rocinante drew their swords. "The Yanguesans, seeing themselves assaulted by only two men while they were so many, betook themselves to their stakes, and driving the two into the middle they began to lay on with great zeal and energy; in fact, at the second blow they brought Sancho to the ground, and Quixote fared the same way, all his skill and high mettle availing him nothing, and fate willed it that he should fall at the feet of Rocinante, who had not yet risen".

De lo que le sucedió al ingenioso hidalgo en la venta que él imaginaba ser castillo.
"The innkeeper, seeing Don Quixote slung across the ass, asked Sancho what was amiss with him. Sancho answered that it was nothing, only that he had fallen down from a rock and had his ribs a little bruised." She and her daughter made up "a very bad bed for Don Quixote in a garret that showed evident signs of having formerly served for many years as a straw-loft. [There was also quartered a carrier whose sleeping arrangement of pack-saddles was placed a little beyond Quixote's.] On this accursed bed Don Quixote stretched himself and the hostess and her daughter soon covered him with plasters from top to toe."

"The carrier had made an arrangement with her for recreation that night, and she had given him her word that when the guests were quiet and the family asleep she would come in search of him and meet his wishes unreservedly... Then, the time and the hour - an unlucky one for him - arrived for her to come, who in her smock, with bare feet and her hair gathered into a fustian coif, with noiseless and cautious steps entered the chamber where the three were quartered, in quest of the carrier; but scarcely had she gained the door when Don Quixote perceived her, and sitting up in his bed in spite of his plasters and the pain of his ribs, he stretched out his arms to receive his beauteous damsel... but when he perceived the wench struggling to get free and Quixote striving to hold her, [and] not relishing the joke he raised his arm and delivered such a terrible cuff on the lank jaws of the amorous knight that be bathed all his mouth in blood, and not content with this he mounted on his ribs and with his feet tramped all over them at a pace rather smarter than a trot... The bed which was somewhat crazy and not very firm on its feet, unable to support the additional weight of the carrier, came to the ground, and at the mighty crash of this the innkeeper awoke and at once concluded that it must be some brawl of Maritornes." With her master awake, the wench ran in fear and made a ball of herself on Sancho's bed.

"The innkeeper came in exclaiming, "Where art thou, strumpet? Of course this is some of thy work." At this Sancho awoke, and feeling this mass almost on top of him fancied he had the nightmare and began to distribute fisticuffs all round, of which a certain share fell upon Maritornes." The inn-keeper's lamp got knocked out and a great fight erupted in the darkness.

"It so happened that there was lodging that night in the inn a caudrillero of what they call the Old Holy Brotherhood of Toledo, who, also hearing the extraordinary noise of the conflict, seized his staff and the tin case with his warrants, and made his way in the dark into the room crying: "Hold! in the name of the Jurisdiction! Hold!... The officer turned to him and said, "Well, how goes it, good man?". "I would speak more politely if I were you," replied Don Quixote; "is it the way of this country to address knights-errant in that style, you booby?" The cuadrillero finding himself so disrespectfully treated by such a sorry-looking individual, lost his temper, and raising the lamp full of oil, smote Don Quixote such a blow with it on the head that he gave him a badly broken pate."

In pain, Quixote requests the salutiferous balsam which was a mixture oil, wine, salt, and rosemary. All of this was boiled in a pig skin. After drinking a quart, he vomits till nothing is left in his stomach. "and with the pangs and spasms of vomiting he broke into a profuse sweat, on account of which he bade them to cover him up and leave him alone. They did so, and he lay sleeping more than three hours, at the end of which he awoke and felt very great bodily relief and so much ease from his bruises that he thought himself quite cured, and verily believed he had hit upon the balsam of Fierabras; and that with this remedy he might thenceforward, without any fear, face any kind of destruction, battle, or combat, however perilous it might be."

On leaving the inn, Quixote does not pay but instead quotes the rules of knights-errant. The exausted Sancho was blanketed to exact payment until from pure weariness they left off. The compassionate Maritornes gave him some wine to drink. At the gate, he dug his heels into his ass and left not realizing that that the innkeeper detained his alforjas as payment of what was owed to him.

Otras aventuras dignas de ser contadas
On the raod again, Quixote sees two flocks ewes and sheep that he thougth were "two armies about to engage and encounter in the midst of that broad plain....So saying, he dashed into the midst of the squadron of ewes, and began spearing them with as much spirit and intrepidity as if he were transfixing mortal enemies in earnest. The shepherds and drovers accompanying the flock shouted to him to desist; seeing it was no use, they ungirt their slings and began to salute his ears with stones as big as one's fist...Such was the force of the first blow and of the second, that the poor knight in spite of himself came down backwards off his horse...All this time Sancho stood on the hill watching the crazy feats his master was performing, and tearing his beard and cursing the hour and the occasion..."

La alta aventura y rica ganacia del yelmo de Mambrino
Choosing a diffrent road then they had taken before, he charges a barber on a mule who runs away leaving behind his basin which he thinks is the mythical Mambrino's Helmet. It was said that the helmet of pure gold made its wearer invulnerable. Don Quixote and Sancho free a chain gang of galley slaves. They then ride into the woods of the Sierra Morena. One of the freed slaves, Gines de Pasamonte, steals Sancho’s donkey. The barber and priest build a cage on an ox cart, capture him and return him to his village.
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:41 PM   #15
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La Seconda Parte


Don Quixote goes to El Toboso to visit Dulcinea. Along the way, Sancho sees three young peasant girls. Sancho tells him that that Dulcinea is approaching with two maids on horseback, but he sees only three peasants on donkeys. But then he believes that she is Dulcinea and an enchanter has changed her into a peasant. On the road, Don Quixote and Sancho encounter a wagon filled with actors. They imitate Quixote and take Dapple, but later on they return Sancho's mule. While sleeping in a grove, they encounter the Knight of the Wood and the Squire of the Wood. Together, they discuss their knightly adventures. The Knight of the Wood is dressed in shiny material, and so is renamed The Knight of the Mirrors. Quixote has a due with him. He knocks him off his horse, removes his visor and sees Sampson Carrasco. The Squire of the Wood turns out to be Thomas Cecial, Sancho’s neighbor. Shortly afterwards, they meet the Knight in the Green Topcoat. They meet puppeteer Master Pete who puts on a show. The deluded Quixote attacks and destroys everything, but later, unlike the earlier time at the inn, he pays for the loss. They meet the unnmamed Duke and Duchess who create a series of pranks with Sancho becoming governor of a fictitious isle, fulfilling Quixote's promise of governorship. The Knight of the White Moon who is again Sampson Carrasco fights Quixote and defeats him. And as a consequence, he must abandon knight errantry. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza return to La Mancha after more bad experiences at the hand of the Duke and Duchess.

"The cruel practical jokes eventually lead Don Quixote to a great melancholy. The novel ends with Don Quixote regaining his full sanity, and renouncing all chivalry. But, the melancholy remains, and grows worse. Sancho tries to restore his faith, but his attempt to resurrect Alonso's alter-ego fails, and Alonso Quixano dies, sane and broken - wiki.





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Old 01-18-2012, 07:43 PM   #16
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Don Quixote en la Lengua Española

CD Uno
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Old 01-21-2012, 12:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BohemianGraham View Post
1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
6. 1984, by George Orwell
7. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
8. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
9. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
10. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
11. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
12. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
13. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
14. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
15. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
16. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
17. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
18. The Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner
19. A Room with a View - E.M. Forster
20. Howard's End - E.M. Forster
21. Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
22. Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
23 & 24. Huckleberry Fin & Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
25. The Chronicles of Narnia
26. Pretty much everything else by vonnegut I haven't listed yet
27. Billy Budd, Sailor - Herman Melville
28. All of the Sherlock Holmes novels/short story collections by Arthur Conan Doyle
29. Anything by Lucy Maud Montgomery. She wrote so much more than Anne, and I still read her books at least once a year.
30. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Emmuska Orczy

I have way more, I'll list them later.
in bold what i have read, far too few...

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