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Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Audio > Subwoofers


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Old 04-24-2013, 06:08 PM   #1
dazkyl dazkyl is offline
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Dec 2012
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Post Subwoofer volume knob level vs AVR subwoofer level ?

I found out that the best settings for my subwoofer for the best and smoothest bass response is that i set the dial volume on the back of the sub to 9-10 o'clock and +4dB from the AVR. But some folks told me that the best setting is that i turn up the dial up volume from the back of the sub with 0dB trim setting until i get the same bass response as i got right now. So in short , 0dB from AVR and just mess with the dial volume on the back of the sub. But when i do this , my sub seems to rumble, dunno why.

Also some guys told me to set the level on the back of the sub at 12 o'clock point and than mess with avr sub trim setting from ''-3dB to 0dB''

What's the best setting to do ? Is it safe running my sub +4dB hot ?

Last edited by dazkyl; 04-24-2013 at 06:11 PM.
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:41 PM   #2
hakstone hakstone is offline
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As in all things audio/video, there is no singular answer. I would start with the sub dial set to half way between min and max and then adjust avr. If you find you need to set the db real high or real low, adjust the sub dial.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:18 PM   #3
HAMP HAMP is offline
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I donít know which AVR you have or how large of a room you. Those two I mentioned plus which subwoofer you have will make a difference with setting it all up. They all make a difference in preference where the dial and what settings you have in the AVR.

So, if you find that you like the sub at 9-10 Oíclock with the AVR +4, that is your preference and if you like it, then itís the best possible its going to be.

But, if you are curious of other settings, then you really should get an SPL meter. A SPL meter is your best little tool to help you tweak your system.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:57 PM   #4
Tom V. Tom V. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazkyl View Post
I found out that the best settings for my subwoofer for the best and smoothest bass response is that i set the dial volume on the back of the sub to 9-10 o'clock and +4dB from the AVR. But some folks told me that the best setting is that i turn up the dial up volume from the back of the sub with 0dB trim setting until i get the same bass response as i got right now. So in short , 0dB from AVR and just mess with the dial volume on the back of the sub. But when i do this , my sub seems to rumble, dunno why.

Also some guys told me to set the level on the back of the sub at 12 o'clock point and than mess with avr sub trim setting from ''-3dB to 0dB''

What's the best setting to do ? Is it safe running my sub +4dB hot ?

Which receiver and subwoofer are you using?

Both of these controls essentially do the same thing(increase voltage going to the amplification stage of the powered subwoofer). As long as you avoid the extremes of either control....you should be fine. If your receiver doesn't have an "auto setup" calibration feature consider purchasing a SPL meter(usually <$50) to aid in manual calibration. It is very difficult to correctly calibrate bass levels by "ear".


Tom V.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:57 PM   #5
dazkyl dazkyl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAMP View Post
I donít know which AVR you have or how large of a room you. Those two I mentioned plus which subwoofer you have will make a difference with setting it all up. They all make a difference in preference where the dial and what settings you have in the AVR.

So, if you find that you like the sub at 9-10 Oíclock with the AVR +4, that is your preference and if you like it, then itís the best possible its going to be.

But, if you are curious of other settings, then you really should get an SPL meter. A SPL meter is your best little tool to help you tweak your system.
Room is about 4.3m x 4.6 m and its small. Sub is the jamo sub 2 60 8'' and is positioned in the left front corner and im impressed with the results this sub gave me ! Im a little bit worried maybe some sound will clip with the +4dB setting on the sub. All the speakers are set to small and rears and center speaker is set to +3dB , rears +2dB and fronts 0dB
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:03 PM   #6
dazkyl dazkyl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom V. View Post
Which receiver and subwoofer are you using?

Both of these controls essentially do the same thing(increase voltage going to the amplification stage of the powered subwoofer). As long as you avoid the extremes of either control....you should be fine. If your receiver doesn't have an "auto setup" calibration feature consider purchasing a SPL meter(usually <$50) to aid in manual calibration. It is very difficult to correctly calibrate bass levels by "ear".


Tom V.
Reciver : Onkyo tx sr-308 and jamo subwoofer 260. With the 9-10 o'clock volume position , im getting very good headroom and great clarity from this amazing small sub. Its positioned in the left front corner and room is 4.3 x 4.6m and i sit about 3.3m away from subwoofer. I didnt expect such great results with this subwoofer. Should i keep it like this with the +3dB trim level ?
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:08 PM   #7
pentatonic pentatonic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazkyl View Post
I found out that the best settings for my subwoofer for the best and smoothest bass response is that i set the dial volume on the back of the sub to 9-10 o'clock and +4dB from the AVR. But some folks told me that the best setting is that i turn up the dial up volume from the back of the sub with 0dB trim setting until i get the same bass response as i got right now. So in short , 0dB from AVR and just mess with the dial volume on the back of the sub. But when i do this , my sub seems to rumble, dunno why.

Also some guys told me to set the level on the back of the sub at 12 o'clock point and than mess with avr sub trim setting from ''-3dB to 0dB''

What's the best setting to do ? Is it safe running my sub +4dB hot ?
I believe you already have your answer as there is no real "ideal" settings, it all depends on your room and your preference, what you consider good bass might not be what I consider good bass. As mentioned though an SPL meter might be a good tool to test out, though if it turns out you like your bass at 72 dbs, that's fine also.
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:13 PM   #8
dazkyl dazkyl is offline
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Originally Posted by pentatonic View Post
I believe you already have your answer as there is no real "ideal" settings, it all depends on your room and your preference, what you consider good bass might not be what I consider good bass. As mentioned though an SPL meter might be a good tool to test out, though if it turns out you like your bass at 72 dbs, that's fine also.
Im using the SPL meter app in my iphone because right now i do not own any SPL Meter. And i do not know what the reference master volume on my AVR is because my volume is from 0 all the way up to 57. Its not with - / + master volume. Because people say that it should be set at 0dB volume on master volume and measure 75dB for all speakers with spl meter. Should i measure the subwoofer 5dB higher than the speakers or 5dB less than the speakers?
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:36 PM   #9
hakstone hakstone is offline
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You have the same question in 2 diff threads ? Subwoofer
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:40 PM   #10
pentatonic pentatonic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazkyl View Post
Im using the SPL meter app in my iphone because right now i do not own any SPL Meter. And i do not know what the reference master volume on my AVR is because my volume is from 0 all the way up to 57. Its not with - / + master volume. Because people say that it should be set at 0dB volume on master volume and measure 75dB for all speakers with spl meter. Should i measure the subwoofer 5dB higher than the speakers or 5dB less than the speakers?
Everything should be at 75dB when your receiver is set at reference (Which avr do you own, it might help), but our ears are not the same, our preference are just that, preferences. As a rule of thumb, using the avr test tones 75dB it should be. I would also start with the sub at 0, but if it sounds better to you at 10 with a +4 trim, then set it that way. And the iPhone SPL meter is not perfect, but valid enough to get a good idea.

Good luck and have fun with it.
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Old 04-24-2013, 09:00 PM   #11
HAMP HAMP is offline
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Pretty much to back up what pentatonic mentioned, everything should be at 75dbís. After you have ran your calibration program and save it(I believe that is automatic), goto the screen that tell you the level for each speaker/s and sub.
From the main listening spot, with your Iphone, it should read 75dbs on the phone from each independent speaker or sub.

If you are bothered that the sub is +4 and think that is hot, turn it up on the sub a little and rerun your calibration program. Donít only make adjustments by turning down in the AVR and up on the sub, without re-running the calibration program.

After re-running, always sit in the main seating spot and test the level for each speaker using your SPL.

As mentioned, the IPhone isnít the greatest, but it will give an ruff estimation.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:19 PM   #12
dazkyl dazkyl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAMP View Post
Pretty much to back up what pentatonic mentioned, everything should be at 75dbís. After you have ran your calibration program and save it(I believe that is automatic), goto the screen that tell you the level for each speaker/s and sub.
From the main listening spot, with your Iphone, it should read 75dbs on the phone from each independent speaker or sub.

If you are bothered that the sub is +4 and think that is hot, turn it up on the sub a little and rerun your calibration program. Donít only make adjustments by turning down in the AVR and up on the sub, without re-running the calibration program.

After re-running, always sit in the main seating spot and test the level for each speaker using your SPL.

As mentioned, the IPhone isnít the greatest, but it will give an ruff estimation.
I can only use manual calibration with my AVR as it does not have any autmatic calibration setup like Audyssey and such. What should i set the master volume on the AVR so that i can test each of my speaker with my spl meter ?
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:04 PM   #13
timcat4843 timcat4843 is offline
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An AVR with Audyssey MultEQ XT32 and Sub EQ HT, is your best friend,
when it comes to setting up your entire speaker system.

Time to upgrade your receiver.
BenQ W1080ST DLP 3D Projector
Sony BDP-S5200 3D Blu-ray Player
Onkyo TX-RZ1100 Dolby Atmos/DTS:X (9 Channel) Receiver
Pioneer SP‑T22A‑LR Dolby Atmos Enabled Speaker Module x 4
Pioneer SP-C22 Center Channel Speaker
Pioneer SP-FS52 Floor Standing Speaker x 4
PSA XS15se Subwoofer x 4
Crowson Shadow-8 Motion Actuator (T108SS) x 2 and Crowson D-501 Tactile Motion Amplifier

Last edited by timcat4843; 05-08-2013 at 07:07 PM.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:16 PM   #14
Tom V. Tom V. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazkyl View Post
I can only use manual calibration with my AVR as it does not have any autmatic calibration setup like Audyssey and such. What should i set the master volume on the AVR so that i can test each of my speaker with my spl meter ?

When you goto the speaker setup menu it will give you the option to calibrate or set "levels". When you select this option the receiver should begin outputting test tones that will rotate through all of your speakers. At the default output level, you should set all speakers to 75dB on a meter.

Read through(or DL) the manual for your receiver and I'm sure it will give you a little flow-chart for this.

Tom V.
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Old 03-09-2016, 05:58 PM   #15
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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I know this is an old thread, but generally speaking, what is the main difference between "having the sub gain lower and sub dB level higher on the AVR" vs "having the sub gain higher and sub dB level lower on the AVR"?
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Old 03-09-2016, 08:19 PM   #16
ImPulSive ImPulSive is offline
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Originally Posted by RockyIII View Post
I know this is an old thread, but generally speaking, what is the main difference between "having the sub gain lower and sub dB level higher on the AVR" vs "having the sub gain higher and sub dB level lower on the AVR"?
Safer to have the pre-pro output in the -5 dB territory and then adjust the sub volume knob as needed. Then if you really need to, bump up the pre-pro setting as needed up to a max of 0 dB.

Pushing the pre-pro setting above 0 dB could over drive the input to the sub which can cause amp failure on the sub over time, not to mention distortion.

I wrote to SVS about this because I had similar question, 2 subs, 2 adjustments for each, what was proper way to dial in. So this is coming from somebody with SVS subs and advice from a SVS tech, but it does make sense if you think about it.

If after your cal your pre-pro / AVR uses a setting higher than 0 dB, I would dial up the sub volume a bit more and redo the cal until you get a value in the range of -5 to 0 to protect your subs. This is my preference and there will always be those who will argue and claim something different. But I like the logic behind it, assuming 0dB is reference, anything above 0 dB could be bad to the sub amp.
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Old 03-09-2016, 08:51 PM   #17
Opips3 Opips3 is offline
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You want THX sound? Must a subwoofer 84db. Settling Output in the +20db. And stay at 80Hz.

Weird...
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Old 03-10-2016, 12:37 PM   #18
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImPulSive View Post
Safer to have the pre-pro output in the -5 dB territory and then adjust the sub volume knob as needed. Then if you really need to, bump up the pre-pro setting as needed up to a max of 0 dB.

Pushing the pre-pro setting above 0 dB could over drive the input to the sub which can cause amp failure on the sub over time, not to mention distortion.

I wrote to SVS about this because I had similar question, 2 subs, 2 adjustments for each, what was proper way to dial in. So this is coming from somebody with SVS subs and advice from a SVS tech, but it does make sense if you think about it.

If after your cal your pre-pro / AVR uses a setting higher than 0 dB, I would dial up the sub volume a bit more and redo the cal until you get a value in the range of -5 to 0 to protect your subs. This is my preference and there will always be those who will argue and claim something different. But I like the logic behind it, assuming 0dB is reference, anything above 0 dB could be bad to the sub amp.
I have a 3-subwoofer system (yes, three subs, awkward). I set all three subs between 50 and 40% before calibration, and the AVR dB levels after calibration were +3.5.
So in my case, should I re-run calibration with the gain higher than 50%? perhaps 75%.
What is interesting is that when I had just one sub, calibration final dB level was in the negative with sub gain set at 50-40%, but now with three subs I get +3.5% with gains set at the same 50-40%
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Old 03-16-2016, 05:49 AM   #19
Auditor55 Auditor55 is offline
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Originally Posted by RockyIII View Post
I have a 3-subwoofer system (yes, three subs, awkward). I set all three subs between 50 and 40% before calibration, and the AVR dB levels after calibration were +3.5.
So in my case, should I re-run calibration with the gain higher than 50%? perhaps 75%.
What is interesting is that when I had just one sub, calibration final dB level was in the negative with sub gain set at 50-40%, but now with three subs I get +3.5% with gains set at the same 50-40%
You should use a SPL meter and match the levels of each sub to about 70 db's. You should do that before running the auto-cal because when combine you're going to get a 6-7 db increase. After matching each individual sub and then running them combined, the SPL meter should read 75-76 dB's. then you should run the auto-cal and it probably bring the final setting in the AVR down to a minis number, between -5 and -0.5 db's, which is where you want it.
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Old 03-17-2016, 05:57 PM   #20
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auditor55 View Post
You should use a SPL meter and match the levels of each sub to about 70 db's. You should do that before running the auto-cal because when combine you're going to get a 6-7 db increase. After matching each individual sub and then running them combined, the SPL meter should read 75-76 dB's. then you should run the auto-cal and it probably bring the final setting in the AVR down to a minis number, between -5 and -0.5 db's, which is where you want it.
I did auto calibration without SPL Meter, and I got a final number of +4.5 dB's...What does that really mean? (Subs were set at 45% gain for calibration)
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