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Old 10-23-2014, 11:49 PM   #1
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Default Loudness war coming to movies unfortunately

Sadly I heard the loudness war is coming to movies. Brian McCarty said when theaters moved to digital cinema we gave sound mixers 20 more db of headroom, there is a certain number of them that decided it wasn't headroom it's the programming.

Brian McCarty on Home Theater Geeks was saying Noah had a 3 minute section that if played back at calibrated levels is 130 db which is either the threshold of hearing pain.

The discussion on dB starts at about minute 30


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Old 10-27-2014, 06:16 PM   #2
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While it is true, there are some directors who push the limits of comfort at reference level, most features today are mixed very well. If you look at that scene in "Noah", I truly doubt it hits 130 even on a dbC scale, let alone the dbA scale used by OSHA to measure hearing protection requirements. The highest sustained levels I have ever seen in a feature played at reference "Dolby Fader 7" was the Mettalica movie in Dolby Atmos. It had a few sections that showed 114 dbC for a few seconds, with the biggest peak I saw hitting 117 on an explosion. But, if I switched the meter to dbA, I doubt it ever would have topped 100 db. The headroom has increased, but the reference level has not. Dialog is still mixed to hold around 80-85 db.

A mono optical track had the same 85 db level reference, but only had about 6 db of headroom for a peak level of 91 db.

Dolby Stereo A-type from 1975 improved this to almost 10 db for a peak level of 95 db.

Dolby SR gave another 5 db with the improved noise reduction but also raised the reference level after the NR decode by 3 db for a total of 8 db of improvement, so the maximum level was up to 101 dbC.

For reference, 70 mm magnetic film was also in this range, No noise reduction would give about 12 db of headroom before the distortion became awful. Dolby A and later SR improved this to where +20 over ref was at a tolerable distortion level.

All of the digital format Dolby SR-D, DTS, SDDS, and I think even CDS standarized on -20 DBFS as the reference level for 85 dbC in the theatre. This remains the reference in D-Cinema, and even Dolby Atmos and Barco Auro. This matches well with 70 mm mag with noise reduction. In both the 70 mm mag and digital though, they did add the dedicated LFE subwoofer track. This track on mag was 250 hz and below, on digital, they limited it even further to just 125 hz and below. In both cases, the "in band" level is set 10 db higher than the center channel. This is a bit harder to explain if you have not tuned a system manually from scratch with a spectrum analyzer. If you look at Center channel, playing wide band pink noise, tuned to the proper response at 85 dbC, then the 1/3 octave wide bands from 50 hz to 2 Khz should each measure about 72 db each. Since the LFE subwoofer is only operating from 20 to 125 hz, we use the 1/3 octave bands at 31.5, 40, 50, 63, 80, and 100 hz and tune them to sit at the 82 db level, 10 db higher than each center channel band. If you have a very good SPL meter that holds the dbC weighting down to 20 hz (A Radio Shack will not work well), then wide band pink noise in the LFE will measure about 89 dbC. My best calibrated Radio Shack shows it more like 83 db due to low frequency roll off in the meter. So with the +20 db of headroom, you could measure close to 110 dbC out of the LFE.

What all these do fail to show is that the channels do add up, but when 2 channels, that are well away from each other, play similar, but not perfectly correlated) signals, they will just add about 3 db. Closely coupled speakers with perfectly timed identical signals can add as much as 6 db when the speakers can mutually couple into the room. This trick is used when multiple sub woofers are stacked together for more output.

A typical 5.1 digital system, playing music and effects with reasonable crest factors, can only really hit 114 dbC with all the channels driving at near 0 DBFS digital clip. The peaks to 117 or so are when all 3 screen channels and the LFE play correlated signals that couple well. And with the spacing of those speakers, that means it is at very low frequencies.

If you look at threshold of hearing MAF curves and the threshold of pain across frequency, you will notice right away that frequencies below 200 hz are not really an issue. All OSHA compliance tests are done using dbA scale which rejects low frequencies.

Here is a section of the OSHA guidelines..
" In addition to the 8‐hour TWAs, OSHA’s noise standards list a short‐term level of 115 dBA for a 15 minute period, which is not to be exceeded; this is for steady state sounds measured on the slow response setting. Although sound this loud is unusual, some dosimeter models indicate when the maximum allowable sound level of 115 dBA has been exceeded. This signal should not be used for compliance determination, however, because it might not take the duration of the exposure to this noise level into consideration. But noise that exceeds 115 dBA should be incorporated into the overall TWA noise exposure determination (see Section II.I.2—OSHA Noise Standards for more information). The standard for short‐term noise levels is distinct from OSHA’s instantaneous ceiling limit of 140 dBA for impact noises (occurring less frequently than one per second and typically measured using a sound
level meter set to the fast response setting. "

Now, I will be one of the first to say some movies are just too loud, but as you can see from this, there is really no chance of hearing damage from any movie played at reference level.

Are some scenes too loud for too long, sure, Transformers really comes to mind, and will some people want to wear ear plug, sure. but compared to even a mild live band at a club, a movie soundtrack is quite tame. I had lunch at a Chilis the other day, and just the juke box in the bar area was over 100 dbC the entire time, far more annoying than gun shots, an explosion, or a car crash in a movie. I was with a colleague and we both commented that people will complain in a movie theatre for far less.

Measure that extreme scene in "Noah" on dbA and I will bet it never tops 105 db, and certainly for well under 15 minutes where OSHA would require hearing protection for a worker in that setting for 40 hours a week.

I like movies to be dynamic. Dialog should be at a proper comfortable level so you can understand it all without staining to listen. Subtle sounds should be appropriate, like bird chirps and babbling water. And if a pound of C4 goes off in the car next to you, you should feel it punch the air. I had the car next to me get rear ended at about 25 mph impact, and I had my window open, trust me, that was way louder than any car crash I hear in a movie theatre. Sound mixing engineers do an amazing job of crushing reality down into the dynamic range available. Next time there is a scene with someone whispering to another on screen, think about how 500 people can hear it, like a whisper, but noone else in the scene can hear them? And when the cars crash and the propane tank explodes, the real sound was probably over 140 dbA, tamed to about 105 to not just fit on the track, but to not make people run out of the theatre either.

Trailers and some movies are still just too loud, and this has caused a bigger problem. Many theatres do not even try for reference level. Most time when I pay for a ticket, I can tell right away it is low. A few places, I can get a peak through the projection window. Many Dolby processors have a nice big red LED Main fader readout that you can read from 15 feet away. Reference level for 85 dbC is "7.0" I commonly see then at 5.0 to 5.5 which is a range of 79 dbC to 80.5 dbC. Each full number is 3 db in level on a Dolby fader. So there have been a few features where they planned it to run at 5.0 on the fader and recorded some things as much as 6 db loud for it to work in the theatre. This is a BAD practice and it is starting to go away, but it happened enough, that some theatres will never run over 5.5 no matter the type of movie.

The trailer issue is even worse. TASA (Trailer Audio Standard Association) has done a great job of getting much closer, but it has created a further issue. Here is a link to their web site if you are curious.

http://www.tasatrailers.org/whatis.html

Since the metering is well outlined and you can purchase one, the people who make trailers have been working out how to "trick" the system so they can still make their trailer louder than the others to get your attention. This has been a battle since the first radio commercials. We have just 30 seconds, make it all count!! What they fail to realize to this day is that the TASA 85 db LEQm number is a LIMIT, not a required level to hit. Som trailers of subtle movies with no big effects end up being recorded way too loud to get up to 85. It is just plain silly. They need to ignore the LEQ meter, record a nice sountrack, and then check to make sure they didn't violate the limit. Sounds simple enough, but they fail all the time.

So.... we get to the theatre, they iple on the 10 clips on the front of the movie, and one person in the hot spot of the theatre complains that it is too loud (never mind it was one obnoxious trailer), then the manager drops the level 3 to 6 db, even though the other 300 people are loving it. Now the whole show runs low again, and the director is tempted to record it hotter to "fix" the problem. Very few people will ever complain a movie is too quiet. I asked one manager, when I complained about it being too low. It was at 4.5 or just 77.5 dbC. He said, at this level they do not get complaint so they always just leave it under 5. I got him to put it up to 6.0 (I wanted 6.5) and told him I would pay for any ticket for anyone who wanted a refund, there was not a single complaint, and I even overheard a few on the way out saying it was the best sound they ever heard on a movie. For your curiosity, this was on "Guardians of the Galaxy" in Dolby Atmos. Playing that at 4.5 is a crime.

Most theatre sound systems can change levels in the program. Few bother to take the time to set that up though. Run the trailers at 5.0 and the feature at 6.5 and very few will ever complain, and many will thank the manager. 6.5 is just knocking off 1.5 db for the over excited director and sound mixer.

Bother Dolby Atmos and Barco Auro do have more channels (or audio feeds) going into the room, but they still have to listen in a calibrated room and make sure they keep the result sane. In the case of Dolby Atmos, the system does need a lot of headroom for the panning objects to work correctly. Each speaker needs to be able to produce 99 db, because that gun shot could come from any one speaker, anywhere in the room. If you have 32 surrounds that can all do 99 db, you get the idea. 102 for 2, 105 for 4, 108 for 8, 111, for 16, 114 dbC for 32 speakers all driving at 99 db together. No director in his right mind would ever plan for that. And since a Dolby Atmos system could have as few as 16 surrounds in a smaller room, they can never plan on having that much level available when mixing.

Sorry for the long run on post, but I hate paying to see a movie and having it turned down for the one person who does not like sound louder than his popcorn chewing.
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Old 10-28-2014, 09:20 PM   #3
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The loudness war in music mastering is not really about peak volume or setting reference levels though, more about the squashing of dynamic range so that everything is always at said peak level. My main example for horrible overcompression and lack of dynamic range in movies is the recent blu release of Man of Steel. Good lord, that thing is just redlining the entire time. Though, I do find overly dynamic mixes where the dialog is crazy quiet and then sound effects/music or whatnot just balst you. I'm looking at you Alien 3 and Thunderball.
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Old 10-28-2014, 11:25 PM   #4
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Abuse of dynamic range compression in movies has been around for a while and unfortunately reviewers and consumers praise LOud-FIdelity mixes. Often misconstruing brute loudness for dynamics.

Hate Indie labels and films that cook their mixes and not even bother avoiding excessive clipping. Start a disc and the opening logo for the company of film and it is just a wall of noise and distortion.

I have not watched it but evidently Bayformers 4 is excessively compressed as well.

STID has an overall effective range of 12db with clipping whereas ST09 is about 14db or a smidge more with minimal clipping but it sounds considerably better.

Agreed MoS sounds like rubbish, along with TDKR and other recent offenders.

So technically movies may not be peaking above 115dbs or what have you but due to compressing dynamics to and beyond the threshold you get obnoxiously loud mixes.

Video games generally abuse dynamic range as well, it is disappointing that there are so few well engineered and balanced audio mixes in games.

Current offender on my radar is the all the games under 343 Industries control; Halo 4, Halo 1 & 2 Anniversary both sound like garbage. Everything is so damn compressed that all sounds seem to be right next to you the entire time. Footsteps sounds like a jackhammer. THUD THUD!!!!!!

Alien: Isolation has been typically an extremely pleasant surprise, except with certain instances of really loud sound events, with a cornucopia of dynamic sound effects that actually has some attack and release. Ambient noises actually having differing levels and have decay that avoids causing everything to be perceived as extremely near-field.

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Old 10-28-2014, 11:58 PM   #5
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It is like anything else - people mistake a for b. Having it louder doesn't make it better. Without a proper mix, all you get is noise and a poor experience. Plus ticked neighbours.
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Old 10-29-2014, 01:30 AM   #6
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Great comments in here.

One movie track that springs to mind in how it should be done is Elysium.

For those unaware of the DB forum, they have a list which features ranked films in terms of audio, although their main focus is on bass, they also rate the DR, level and execution of the track:

http://data-bass.ipbhost.com/index.p...mes-music-etc/

A few titles that I would highly recommend are:

Elysium
Oblivion
Live Free Or Die Hard
Dredd
Star Trek
Hellboy 2
Cloverfield
Drive
Super 8 (I don't think they have tested it)

I created a thread awhile ago with regards to DR in music:

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=238499

Last edited by Tech-UK; 10-29-2014 at 01:41 AM.
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Old 10-29-2014, 06:37 AM   #7
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Yes, over-level compressed movies (and music) that have no dynamic range makes me absolutely crazy.

There are simply too many directors (and music producers) with weak egos who are so insecure, they don't feel their film has emotion, so they think they can build that emotion by making everything RIDICULOUSLY LOUD.

What they don't realize is that our brains react more to changes in level. Like the spooky sound that comes out of dead silence. When everything is loud all the time, it just become tedious to listen to. And all that work they did to mix together hundreds of sound stems into a cohesive mix is lost, because it all turns to mush.

Maybe I haven't seen the crappy action films that tend most to do this, but I felt like this was a bigger problem a few years ago. I find that trailers are almost universally LOUD, but once the feature starts, it's generally been okay.

One exception was the last James Bond movie shown in a Lie-Max theatre. That was so ridiculously loud, I used hearing protection when watching the film. I think it's absurd that even in scenes of only dialog when there's no music or primary sound effects, that I feel like the characters are SCREAMING at me when they're simply having a conversation.

Some years back, I was at the Audio Engineering Society convention at a panel of music producers. This was around the time that the "Beatles #1" compilation was released on CD. The tracks on that CD are more level compressed than when those songs were originally released. The panel was asked if the Beatles would have been as popular if they had used today's recording and mastering techniques and the general consensus was that they wouldn't have been - that their music would have become tedious to listen to. And I think that's one of the many reasons why so many people don't feel the need to own music anymore - nothing sounds that special because it all sounds like mush, since it's all so level compressed. And if nothing sounds so unique, there's no reason to want to own it.
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Old 10-29-2014, 11:04 AM   #8
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The loudest movie I've ever seen in a theater was X2, over a decade ago, so not sure how much truth there is. I've been to IMAX's in other states and they didn't sound overly loud. It's all dependent on the theater based on my experience.

I found the Blu-ray of Man of Steel to sound very consistent and not overly loud and I've played it back pretty loud for my relatively small room.
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Old 10-29-2014, 11:19 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kryptonic View Post
The loudest movie I've ever seen in a theater was X2, over a decade ago, so not sure how much truth there is. I've been to IMAX's in other states and they didn't sound overly loud. It's all dependent on the theater based on my experience.

I found the Blu-ray of Man of Steel to sound very consistent and not overly loud and I've played it back pretty loud for my relatively small room.
As already discussed, it isn't only about peak volume but the average volume of a track. Compressed doesn't necessarily relate to loud, but rather to flat. Its just that the two commonly go together. I haven't seen MoS, so I cannot comment on it myself.
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Old 10-29-2014, 02:56 PM   #10
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I'm not sure. I have watched more movies that were annoyingly dynamic than ones that were not. Some of us have sleeping kids. I watch movies at maybe -30. So when I am straining to hear the dialog, and then loud music or explosions or whatnot happen- sorry, that doesn't work for me. And I'd venture to say that 90%+ of people aren't experiencing movies in a dedicated theater at reference level.

I believe I have dynamic range compression enabled through Audessey, and that seems to help, but still can leave something to be desired.
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Old 10-30-2014, 07:46 AM   #11
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I have to agree completely about the lack of dynamics in many features. Loud for a long time is bad, and a bit too common, but as has been said in here, the feature mixes on average do seem to be getting better. As crazy loud as the Mettalica movie got (and I am not a big Mettalica fan, but my girlfriend is) it did have some amazing dynamics. The transitions scenes between songs, when they follow the poor kids in his ordeal in the city, some of it got eerie quiet, at one point, you could just about hear your own heart beat, and just the kid breathing, right before all hell broke loose again. A good swing of 70 db in a matter of seconds. Yeah, that may be a problem with sleeping kids in the next room.

Hopefully, Disney will release "Frozen" in Dolby Atmos on Blu Ray so you can hear what dynamics and music can sound like. When I saw that one in a theatre in Atmos, I was not expecting the music track to sound that different from what 5.1 and 7.1 can do with music, but it was a real eye opener. As the music builds, they pull the score wider and higher and it goes off the screen into the front wide speakers and up into the front of the ceiling and just envelopes the audience. The surrounds further back and over the top are used to add incredibly natural sounding reverb and space to the sound, making it feel like you are in an orchestra hall. The mix did sound good in 5.1 but the Atmos version was just spectacular. It proves that object based audio is not just for crap flying over your head. It is a huge shame that "Transformers 4" was the first Blu Ray Atmos release, it is one of the worst soundtracks in the format.

I have paid to see exactly one movie in a LIe MAX and it will be the last. It was not just loud, it was flat out obnoxious and annoying. It was one of the bigger versions of the digital condensed IMAX rooms with nearly 400 seats. We sat just 5 rows from the back, and only a few seat right of center. These should have been ideal in a normal theatre. The dual 2K projectors were plenty bright, but it looked like the contrast was blown out, all black or white, and little between. But 2K on a nearly 70 foot wide screen meant, wow, I can see every last pixel, from almost the back of the theatre, YUCK! By the end of their silly, wow laser aligned sound intro, I was ready to walk out. The laser aimed right surround speaker, yeah, the only one, back in the corner, was aimed directly into my right ear. Every sound out of that channel felt like a pencil being stuck through my ear drum into my brain. The softest dialog in the movie was at the top of my tolerance range, and when they were fighting and yelling, holy crap was it annoying. The music and explosions were awful. I like a loud dynamic soundtrack, but that was painful.

One of my favorite all time albums in Pink Floyd "Dark Side of the Moon". It has some of the most amazing dynamics. The CD is really pushed to it's limits, and I had to get the SACD version to get what the vinyl had on it. The quiet parts on the CD start to sound a bit grungy and the peaks feel crushed. The LP and SACD are alive. 16 bit just does not cut it.

Hopefully mixer are going to figure out how to make good use of dynamics again. I fear we have raised 2 generations now on low bit rate MP3's that have never heard what a proper analog system can sound like. I hear teens now listening to this crap full of twangy compression artifacts and they think it sounds great. Give me a little tape hiss or groove noise any day over an MP3 pre rings and harmonic twangs.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:57 PM   #12
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In terms of dynamics I'm not sure how a CD with 96dB could be pushed to its limits, the original 80s release of Brothers in Arms still sounds terrific. I've yet to come across a version of DSOTM that would be labelled as a victim of the loudness wars.

Are you only listening in stereo? The newly mastered 24/96 release of Alan Parson's original 4.0 quad mix on the Blu-ray that comes in the immersion set is a more enjoyable surround experience to the 5.1 SACD for me but I've never listened to the SACD's 2.0 mix...it does have lots of headroom:

Quote:
DR Peak RMS Duration Track
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DR10 -14.55 dB -28.14 dB 1:08 01-Speak To Me
DR10 -06.09 dB -19.48 dB 2:49 02-Breathe
DR10 -06.19 dB -20.93 dB 3:30 03-On The Run
DR10 -05.42 dB -18.41 dB 7:09 04-Time
DR09 -05.48 dB -19.76 dB 4:45 05-The Great Gig In The Sky
DR10 -03.58 dB -16.73 dB 6:22 06-Money
DR09 -07.01 dB -20.47 dB 7:49 07-Us And Them
DR10 -03.69 dB -17.21 dB 3:25 08-Any Colour You Like
DR10 -05.23 dB -20.16 dB 3:48 09-Brain Damage
DR08 -04.99 dB -16.61 dB 2:12 10-Eclipse
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR10

Samplerate: 2822400 Hz / PCM Samplerate: 88200 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5645 kbps
Codec: DSD64
The SACD's CD layer seems to suffer very slightly by not leaving another dB or 2 of headroom:

Quote:
DR10 -9.27 dB -22.47 dB Pink Floyd - 01 - Speak to Me.wav
DR10 -0.68 dB -13.99 dB Pink Floyd - 02 - Breathe.wav
DR10 -0.72 dB -15.82 dB Pink Floyd - 03 - On the Run.wav
DR10 -0.63 dB -12.73 dB Pink Floyd - 04 - Time.wav
DR09 -0.65 dB -14.27 dB Pink Floyd - 05 - The Great Gig in the Sky.wav
DR08 over -11.24 dB Pink Floyd - 06 - Money.wav
DR09 -1.48 dB -14.92 dB Pink Floyd - 07 - Us and Them.wav
DR10 over -11.69 dB Pink Floyd - 08 - Any Colour You Like.wav
DR10 over -14.64 dB Pink Floyd - 09 - Brain Damage.wav
DR08 -0.00 dB -11.15 dB Pink Floyd - 10 - Eclipse.wav ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Number of files: 10
Official DR value: DR9
The original CD has similar headroom to the 2003 SACD but has MORE dynamics:

Quote:
DR11 -7.97 dB -22.31 dB Speak To Me - Breathe In The Air.wav
DR10 -7.25 dB -23.16 dB On The Run.wav
DR13 -3.08 dB -19.74 dB Time.wav
DR11 -5.16 dB -21.54 dB The Great Gig In The Sky.wav
DR12 -2.81 dB -19.12 dB Money.wav
DR10 -7.02 dB -22.11 dB Us And Them.wav
DR12 -5.36 dB -19.35 dB Any Colour You Like.wav
DR11 -5.24 dB -22.35 dB Brain Damage.wav
DR10 -4.26 dB -18.48 dB Eclipse.wav
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Number of files: 9
Official DR value: DR11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZoetMB View Post
One exception was the last James Bond movie shown in a Lie-Max theatre. That was so ridiculously loud, I used hearing protection when watching the film. I think it's absurd that even in scenes of only dialog when there's no music or primary sound effects, that I feel like the characters are SCREAMING at me when they're simply having a conversation.
Sheesh, so it wasn't just my local Lie-MAX then, it was really ridiculously loud. I enjoy volume at a good action movie, but I don't enjoy it if it's going to make my tinnitus worse and I shouldn't have to bring my Etymotic Research ER20s to a cinema (I'm too skint to get custom plugs but these have worked great for all concerts in the last 5 years...I use Speedo silicone plugs for F1 races as fidelity/clarity/treble isn't important).

Last edited by dobyblue; 10-30-2014 at 06:04 PM.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:55 AM   #13
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I saw Interstellar at a faux IMAX recently it was the loudest movie I had ever heard I wished I had brought ear plugs. The only thing that I have heard in the real world that was louder was an F-16 taking off I kid you not.
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:38 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada View Post
I saw Interstellar at a faux IMAX recently it was the loudest movie I had ever heard I wished I had brought ear plugs. The only thing that I have heard in the real world that was louder was an F-16 taking off I kid you not.
I'm so glad I wasn't the only one that thought this! I loved the movie but jeez, 20 minutes into it I was wishing I was at home so I could grab the remote.
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Old 12-04-2014, 04:24 PM   #15
jscoggins jscoggins is offline
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Looking at the chart in the OP makes me not want to see movies in theaters anymore. The stuff in the 60 decibels range is irritating enough, lol.
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:32 PM   #16
ZoetMB ZoetMB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVinstallGuy View Post
One of my favorite all time albums in Pink Floyd "Dark Side of the Moon". It has some of the most amazing dynamics. The CD is really pushed to it's limits, and I had to get the SACD version to get what the vinyl had on it. The quiet parts on the CD start to sound a bit grungy and the peaks feel crushed. The LP and SACD are alive. 16 bit just does not cut it.
I have to disagree with you a little bit on that one. A Red Book CD has a potential dynamic range of about 96db. An LP has a potential dynamic range of about 35db. While I also own the "Dark Side" SACD and think it sounds really terrific, there's nothing wrong with 16 bit CDs. They are capable of plenty of dynamic range - it's just not frequently used - in fact many CDs are mastered with less dynamic range than what an LP is capable of. But it has nothing to do with the capability of the technology - it's how the mixing and mastering engineers choose to use it.

I still have all my vinyl but the hype about vinyl is ridiculous. 75% of new vinyl is mastered from the digital CD master. And most vinyl does not sound superior to the CD. I recently bought the "Revolver" mono analog remaster and while it sounds pretty good, both the mono and stereo CD remasters sound better (IMO). And even though the canon is supposed to be the mono version, I actually do like the stereo version better.

Back in the day (before CD), all we did was complain about how crappy U.S. vinyl pressings were. Audiophiles used to seek out European and Japanese pressings.
loose="not tight", lose="can't find it, doesn't have anymore" or the opposite of "win".
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Old 12-26-2014, 10:59 AM   #17
Brett C Brett C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech-UK View Post
Great comments in here.

One movie track that springs to mind in how it should be done is Elysium.

For those unaware of the DB forum, they have a list which features ranked films in terms of audio, although their main focus is on bass, they also rate the DR, level and execution of the track:

http://data-bass.ipbhost.com/index.p...mes-music-etc/

A few titles that I would highly recommend are:

Elysium
Oblivion
Live Free Or Die Hard
Dredd
Star Trek
Hellboy 2
Cloverfield
Drive
Super 8 (I don't think they have tested it)

I created a thread awhile ago with regards to DR in music:

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=238499
While I like the movie, I do not share your enthusiasm for the mix on Super 8, I find it quite fatiguing when played at a loud levels.

Here is the Data-bass report on it,

http://data-bass.ipbhost.com/index.p...thread/?p=4158
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Old 12-26-2014, 12:55 PM   #18
Tech-UK Tech-UK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brett C View Post
While I like the movie, I do not share your enthusiasm for the mix on Super 8, I find it quite fatiguing when played at a loud levels.

Here is the Data-bass report on it,

http://data-bass.ipbhost.com/index.p...thread/?p=4158
Yeah, it does clip, and thus fatiguing at high levels. Its not top tier, but still a pretty good track.

I would add Edge of Tomorrow to my list of recommended though. Oh, and Lone Survivor.
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Old 12-26-2014, 06:47 PM   #19
Brett C Brett C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tech-UK View Post
Yeah, it does clip, and thus fatiguing at high levels. Its not top tier, but still a pretty good track.

I would add Edge of Tomorrow to my list of recommended though. Oh, and Lone Survivor.
I agree, both of those are great tracks.
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Tech-UK (12-26-2014)
Old 12-29-2014, 09:48 AM   #20
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