Best Blu-ray Deals

Best Blu-ray Deals, See All the Deals »
Top deals | Price drops  
 All countries United States United Kingdom Canada Germany France Spain Italy Japan
RoboCop (Blu-ray)
$5.00
Ender's Game (Blu-ray)
$13.00
Gremlins (Blu-ray)
$4.99
Mallrats (Blu-ray)
$9.96
Gravity 3D (Blu-ray)
$19.99
Diary of a Wimpy Kid Trilogy (Blu-ray)
$16.98
Gravity (Blu-ray)
$12.99
Reality Bites (Blu-ray)
$9.96
Ocean Giants (Blu-ray)
$11.99
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (Blu-ray)
$5.99
Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues (Blu-ray)
$12.99
Ripper Street: Season Two (Blu-ray)
$19.99
Weird Science (Blu-ray)
$6.96
Pacific Rim 3D (Blu-ray)
$14.99
Planet Earth | Life (Blu-ray)
$54.99
The Goonies (Blu-ray)
$4.99
Despicable Me 2 (Blu-ray)
$14.99
Ferris Bueller's Day Off (Blu-ray)
$4.99
Knocked Up (Blu-ray)
$6.96
Old 04-24-2009, 05:56 PM   #1
JrCT0091 JrCT0091 is offline
Junior Member
 
Apr 2009
Default Digital Coaxial vs. Digital Optical

I recently upgraded my A/V Receiver and Blu-ray player. I noticed when I went to hook-up my 5-Disc DVD/CD Changer (using it solely for playing Audio CDs - waiting for the 5-disc Blu-ray changer technology to come out to eventually use one unit for BD, DVD, and music CDs), my Yamaha receiver recommended to use a Digital Coaxial (orange color coded) audio connection from my 5 disc Sony DVD/CD player…I didn’t have any Digital Coaxial cable, so I used the Digital Optical Cable & Connection between my Sony 5-Disc Player and the Yamaha receiver.

Any insight/opinions out there as to which Cable (Coaxial or Optical) will give a better sound when playing music CDs only? Or are they equal (I already have my Blu-ray connected through HDMI - so I know the movies Audio/Video is set there), but wasn’t sure for Music CDs, which connection might sound better (one better than the other or equal).

Also, an additional inquiry…I was always curious if the length of a cable (HDMI, Coaxial, Optical, etc.) effects performance of Audio or Video Stream quality (i.e. is it better to use the shortest possible length cables/cords vs. longer ones to ensure optimal Audio/Video outputs??)

Thanks for any advice/feedback…be well.

Jr.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2009, 05:59 PM   #2
jomari jomari is offline
Moderator
 
jomari's Avatar
 
Nov 2007
18
2
Default

There is no significant difference in regards to audio quality when choosing either the Toslink or the Coax.

I personally try to keep my cables as short as possible, but it shouldnt be a problem at all in regards to the connectivity and/or quality at all. unless you're running an extremely longer cable, 40feet or what not for no reason.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2009, 06:01 PM   #3
VinnAY VinnAY is offline
Banned
 
Sep 2008
1
Default

they're the same as far as the transmission its just that one does it optically and the other is electrical. I think that the length of cables, some could be detrimental (ie. signal loss) over too long, but more for me it's about overpaying for a 16' cable when a 6' will do.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2009, 06:04 PM   #4
jomari jomari is offline
Moderator
 
jomari's Avatar
 
Nov 2007
18
2
Default

we also have a sticky here posted, if you cared to learn more about it...

A Guide to Optical, Coaxial, and Speaker Cables
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 12:21 PM   #5
musicman1999 musicman1999 is offline
Active Member
 
Nov 2007
Default

i prefer coax,mostly because they have a much better connector and the cables are usually better built. the only advantage to optical is if you have a rf interference issue, they are a little more resistant than coax. in your case however the real question should be which component has the best DAC, if its the player then the proper choice would be neither, analog would be the proper pick.

bill
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 02:12 PM   #6
CasualKiller CasualKiller is offline
Power Member
 
CasualKiller's Avatar
 
Feb 2008
Lethbridge Alberta
4
54
15
Default

With optical you get signal degradation due to light reflecting inside the cable.This results in timing errors and may leave a "smear" on the signal.

Best bet is to pick up a coax cable and try both for yourself to see what you like.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 02:19 PM   #7
DavePS3 DavePS3 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
DavePS3's Avatar
 
Jan 2007
Toronto
47
1
Default

I've run a DVD chapter on both, leaving the volume on the receiver the same and found that the Coax does have slightly clearer sound with slightly better steering in the rears but have never noticed any difference in the various coax cables available. I found no difference in sound - or it was too slight for my ears to pick up, between a Radio Shack white Coax cable using RF to RCA adaptors and a Monster 'made for digital audio'. The sheilding on the coax is only worth stepping up, if you're running that coax a long way and along side of AC power lines.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 02:22 PM   #8
DavePS3 DavePS3 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
DavePS3's Avatar
 
Jan 2007
Toronto
47
1
Default

By the way, dunno if you guys have heard of it but Planet Waves, made by Daddario (the music accessories guys) is the easiest and simplest coax cable system I've come across. Bloody amazing and you can get everything you need in pre-packaged kits rather than the bulk buying stuff made for the custom installer.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 02:40 PM   #9
Clark Kent Clark Kent is offline
Blu-ray Count
 
Clark Kent's Avatar
 
Oct 2007
Metropolis
2
91
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CasualKiller View Post
With optical you get signal degradation due to light reflecting inside the cable.This results in timing errors and may leave a "smear" on the signal.

Best bet is to pick up a coax cable and try both for yourself to see what you like.
I do not have the time to post a full answer but this post is essentially correct. Higher-end systems will reveal sound differences between optical and coaxial connections. Cheaper optical cables can slightly lessen the sound quality in comparison.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2009, 08:35 PM   #10
jeff92k7 jeff92k7 is offline
Active Member
 
jeff92k7's Avatar
 
Dec 2008
Dallas, Texas
8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CasualKiller View Post
With optical you get signal degradation due to light reflecting inside the cable.This results in timing errors and may leave a "smear" on the signal.

Best bet is to pick up a coax cable and try both for yourself to see what you like.
Hogwash. In normal home theater lengths, there will not be any, I repeat ANY noticeable difference between the two cable technologies.

Signal reflection only becomes problematic with an excessively bent cable or one that is cracked or broken. A normal optical cable will carry the signal without any problem.

By your logic, how do you explain away cable capacitance and resistance in a coaxial cable?

Modern equipment is designed to work within the limitations of the connectivity technologies (optical or electrical) and reconstruct the signal exactly as it was originally transmitted. Anyone who can come on here and say they can hear a sound quality difference between digital audio carried via optical cable as opposed to coaxial cable, ALL other things being equal, is talking out their rear-end.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2009, 08:39 PM   #11
Pelican170 Pelican170 is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
Pelican170's Avatar
 
Jul 2007
Sandy Hook, CT PS3-PSNetwork ID: Pelican170 PS4-PSN Network ID: TheAngryRager
264
194
2
Default

Im pretty sure the only differences are bandwidth issues, where Coax handles more...
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2009, 08:27 AM   #12
welwynnick welwynnick is offline
Senior Member
 
Sep 2007
Default

It has been shown that there IS a difference between optical and coax, though in my experience it is small and difficult to spot reliably on most systems.

Optical connections have measurably and subjectively more degradation from jitter. The simple reason for this is not the transmission medium, but the additional processing to convert electrical signals to optical, and back. This inevitably adds jitter, but I think you have to be pretty serious to worry about. I think the better connector on coax cables is more of a deciding factor.

Nick
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2014, 11:50 AM   #13
siamus siamus is offline
Junior Member
 
Nov 2012
Default

To my untrained ears...


I'd say there is NO difference in the sound itself.


You may get interference with the coaxial cables, but that is fairly easy to correct.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2014, 04:55 PM   #14
42041 42041 is offline
Blu-ray Ninja
 
Oct 2008
Default

Doesn't matter. Your cable is not the limiting factor (well, unless it's super long or stupendously bad).

Last edited by 42041; 02-10-2014 at 04:58 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2014, 07:21 PM   #15
Solo man Solo man is offline
Active Member
 
Solo man's Avatar
 
Jan 2013
Toronto, Ontario
72
251
285
1
Default

I connect my cd player by coax for some of the reasons stated above like bandwidth and prefer the connection type. I feel optical can sometimes pop out easily when moving equipment around to clean.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Audio > Audio Theory and Discussion

Similar Threads
thread Forum Thread Starter Replies Last Post
A Guide to Optical, Digital Coaxial (Interconnect & Sub), and Speaker Cables Audio Theory and Discussion Big Daddy 70 09-28-2013 03:53 PM
coaxial or optical digital audio out Audio Theory and Discussion Julohan 16 02-18-2009 03:55 PM
receiver audio are HDMI audio, optical, and digital coaxial inputs the same? Receivers mustang-gt-2002 4 01-10-2009 05:31 PM
Is there such a thing as digital coaxial to optical? Newbie Discussion tilapiah6 1 07-03-2008 07:40 PM
Digital coaxial to optical? Audio Theory and Discussion tilapiah6 12 07-02-2008 02:21 AM


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:51 AM.