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Old 09-16-2018, 02:30 PM   #1
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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One hot topic seems to be that of DNR applied to film restorations. I see many reacting negatively to DNR use. But I'd like to know if there is ever a time when DNR can be a useful tool. Are there any movies restored on bluray/DVD where DNR did actually improve things?
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Old 09-16-2018, 03:15 PM   #2
Wendell R. Breland Wendell R. Breland is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyIII View Post
One hot topic seems to be that of DNR applied to film restorations. I see many reacting negatively to DNR use. But I'd like to know if there is ever a time when DNR can be a useful tool. Are there any movies restored on bluray/DVD where DNR did actually improve things?
Unless one is involved in the entire process (from film to disc) how would one know if DNR was used and how much. When DNR is over used it is quite apparent. If really interested I would ask Robert Harris this question.
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Old 09-16-2018, 04:42 PM   #3
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post
Unless one is involved in the entire process (from film to disc) how would one know if DNR was used and how much. When DNR is over used it is quite apparent. If really interested I would ask Robert Harris this question.
Any titles known for smart use of DNR?
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Old 09-18-2018, 10:51 PM   #4
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There is nothing wrong with it if used in the right way. These days I don't see much reason to. Shoot on film if you want the grain. Shoot digitally if you don't. 20 years ago it wasn't quite that simple.

One movie I watched today - Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan has DNR applied. But it isn't overdone like some others such as Terminator 2 (possibly the worst offender I've seen).
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Old 09-19-2018, 10:12 AM   #5
RockyIII RockyIII is offline
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There is nothing wrong with it if used in the right way. These days I don't see much reason to. Shoot on film if you want the grain. Shoot digitally if you don't. 20 years ago it wasn't quite that simple.

One movie I watched today - Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan has DNR applied. But it isn't overdone like some others such as Terminator 2 (possibly the worst offender I've seen).
Any examples of applied DNR that did actually improve things?
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Old 07-07-2019, 01:18 AM   #6
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Any examples of applied DNR that did actually improve things?
Define "improve." Terminator 2 4K UHD has DNR applied but I guess it was done to get the wanted outcome with the 3D transfer. I don't know if shooting digitally was an option in 1991. I'm sure if it was, nowhere near the quality you'd get with today's digital cameras like the Arri Alexxa. James Cameron tends to use lots of DNR on his stuff. I think he views film grain as a bad thing and tries to remove it. But like I said, there are many different kinds of DNR that can be used tastefully or abused. I say avoid it if possible but I don't do this stuff for a living so I have no idea how avoiding it entirely would affect the final product. This might be a better question posed to people who do film editing.

Last edited by stonesfan129; 01-12-2020 at 11:08 PM.
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Old 07-07-2019, 02:02 AM   #7
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A little goes a long way.
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Old 05-03-2022, 05:26 AM   #8
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I don't know why there isn't a _sticky_ DNR thread. Or a sticky thread on film restoration techniques and their application.

Digital Noise Reduction (DNR) is a key topic. It comes up ALL THE TIME on hundreds of threads. Many people don't understand it, or why it can be bad. People need to be educated on it.

It's even more imperative now that 4K/UHD discs are becoming a bigger thing, and over-application of DNR still rears it's ugly head regularly.
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Old 05-03-2022, 12:38 PM   #9
oddbox83 oddbox83 is offline
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It's not a simple on/off argument, where DNR use is automatically a bad thing. It's a whole scale starting at no DNR at all through to excessive DNR. I bet a lot of praised restorations sit within the first quarter of that scale and most don't even realise it's there.

I also argue it's material-dependant. If you have original film sources in consistent quality, then people need to think carefully before pushing that DNR button at all. If it's old analogue video, then I think a light and selective use of DNR is pretty much essential since that isn't grain, it's noise. But even video material has examples of DNR overuse. Whatever the format, when the DNR itself becomes obvious I believe it's fundamentally failed in it's purpose.

Last edited by oddbox83; 05-03-2022 at 12:44 PM.
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Old 05-04-2022, 04:06 AM   #10
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Maybe a sticky thread would just be too controversial and wouldn't be as educational as I was originally thinking. It seems like a topic that is very subjective where that line is.

I've read a lot about it and _think_ I understand okay the lines between it's appropriate use and not, but then I still find people that think otherwise in both directions. I consider myself a moderate.
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