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Old 12-01-2020, 12:16 PM   #81
wonkavision wonkavision is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman Horton View Post
Here's another way of looking at the songs that can be perceived as negative. It may help somebody through a difficult time by listening and knowing that other people have felt the same way. Clearly I don't know what you mean when you say a song "slams people down" but I take it you mean songs that are negative or sad and this is another way to look at it.
Here's even another way of looking at it....you wouldn't know an uplifting song without a negative one. What would be the basis of comparison? Exactly.
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Old 12-01-2020, 01:23 PM   #82
BucketheadPikes BucketheadPikes is offline
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I prefer balance when listening to music, the 陰 and 陽. Life isn't always positive or always negative. I enjoy "positive" uplifting songs & "negative" songs, one to counterbalance the other. Sometimes I just want music with a darker sounding atmosphere, &/or has an aggressive/menacing nature to it. Sometimes I want in-your-face lyrics, even if others may find them offensive. In terms of lyrics, a person's perspective/worldview plays a part in what's positive & what's negative. Some people may find certain lyrics to be positive/negative, but I might just view those same lyrics as being negative/positive. An oversaturation of positivity ad nauseam begins to come across as contrived & even as toxic positivity to me even if it's not intended to be, & it then gets a bit annoying. 100% positivity all of the time without exception is just not based in reality, it's fake to me. All that being said, I also listen to quite a bit of music with science fiction/fantasy based lyrics as well, as a sort of escape from reality. I'm also a huge fan of instrumental music. Lyrics? We ain't got no lyrics! We don't need no lyrics! I don't have to sing you any stinking lyrics!
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Old 12-02-2020, 02:36 PM   #83
Al_The_Strange Al_The_Strange is offline
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It's funny how this discussion concerning negative/positive music popped up right after finding a list on the most disturbing albums of all time. I was curious to see if I had heard any (just one though--Boards of Canada's Geogaddi--yeah man, that "Gyroscope" track is pretty creepy, as anybody who's seen the film Sinister knows).

The album that emerged at the top of the list is a kind of dark ambient project--The Caretaker's Everywhere at the End of Time. It's purposefully designed to musically replicate the experience of progressive dementia--thus, the music deteriorates over time until it becomes airy white noise. It's six hours in total (!). I skimmed around the tracks to get a general idea of what it sounds like, and I can see how it's effective. However, with the old-timey nostalgic 30s music chopped up with noise and deterioration, it could throw casual listeners off--is it even "music"? Take it for its artistic intention, it's definitely a kind of musical art that should be taken seriously.

Then I realized that music, as it is with books, movies, paintings, etc., are experiences. I've listened to my fair share of dark, angry, sad, moody music to be moved in some way--it's not that I'm bopping to it the same way I would to pop or dance music, it just resonates in some way. Just as I'd watch Schindler's List to reflect on the holocaust and feel an emotional resonance based on the performances and photography, I could listen to this Caretaker's album to reflect on old age, nostalgia, death, etc and feel for it.

Not everything is meant to be "enjoyed," merely appreciated.

All that being said, I have recently thought hard on my musical experiences, and I have to admit that for most of my time I focus a lot on the surface level beat and feeling of music. I rarely sit down, listen attentively, and study it for lyrics, meaning, structure, and the like. I usually gravitate towards catchy hooks, sick guitar riffs, big beats, modern techno noises, and the like. I really ought to look past those aspects and judge the songs on other merits.

I've been wanting to make a list of my favorite albums and such, but I find it hard to justify that kind of thing without critically listening to the albums many people considered to be the best. I have some serious blind spots, especially regarding classic rock, funk and soul, pop, jazz, and the like. It'll probably become one of my New Years' goals to listen to more music (and really listen), and reevaluate my tastes. I have no doubt I'm missing out on some valuable experiences (even within my collection).

For all that goes, I've started on this endeavor now. Have been listening to the Beatles' Abbey Road while sitting here--hot dang, how have I never heard this whole thing before?
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Old 12-03-2020, 06:50 AM   #84
Hitman Horton Hitman Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al_The_Strange View Post
It's funny how this discussion concerning negative/positive music popped up right after finding a list on the most disturbing albums of all time. I was curious to see if I had heard any (just one though--Boards of Canada's Geogaddi--yeah man, that "Gyroscope" track is pretty creepy, as anybody who's seen the film Sinister knows).

The album that emerged at the top of the list is a kind of dark ambient project--The Caretaker's Everywhere at the End of Time. It's purposefully designed to musically replicate the experience of progressive dementia--thus, the music deteriorates over time until it becomes airy white noise. It's six hours in total (!). I skimmed around the tracks to get a general idea of what it sounds like, and I can see how it's effective. However, with the old-timey nostalgic 30s music chopped up with noise and deterioration, it could throw casual listeners off--is it even "music"? Take it for its artistic intention, it's definitely a kind of musical art that should be taken seriously.

Then I realized that music, as it is with books, movies, paintings, etc., are experiences. I've listened to my fair share of dark, angry, sad, moody music to be moved in some way--it's not that I'm bopping to it the same way I would to pop or dance music, it just resonates in some way. Just as I'd watch Schindler's List to reflect on the holocaust and feel an emotional resonance based on the performances and photography, I could listen to this Caretaker's album to reflect on old age, nostalgia, death, etc and feel for it.

Not everything is meant to be "enjoyed," merely appreciated.

All that being said, I have recently thought hard on my musical experiences, and I have to admit that for most of my time I focus a lot on the surface level beat and feeling of music. I rarely sit down, listen attentively, and study it for lyrics, meaning, structure, and the like. I usually gravitate towards catchy hooks, sick guitar riffs, big beats, modern techno noises, and the like. I really ought to look past those aspects and judge the songs on other merits.

I've been wanting to make a list of my favorite albums and such, but I find it hard to justify that kind of thing without critically listening to the albums many people considered to be the best. I have some serious blind spots, especially regarding classic rock, funk and soul, pop, jazz, and the like. It'll probably become one of my New Years' goals to listen to more music (and really listen), and reevaluate my tastes. I have no doubt I'm missing out on some valuable experiences (even within my collection).

For all that goes, I've started on this endeavor now. Have been listening to the Beatles' Abbey Road while sitting here--hot dang, how have I never heard this whole thing before?
I think you'll find a whole new appreciation once you start paying more attention. You are definitely not alone in this. One thing that I like to do is pull out a new CD and read through all the lyrics before I hear a note. That way, you really are paying attention. If you can, listen through head phones sometimes. Not only can it be a whole new experience but it will also cut out some of the distractions. Finally, give your albums a chance. They don't all sound great right away. Some of them take a few listens.

I can help you out in a couple of areas. Classic Rock magazine out of England, I think, put out a magazine of the 100 best rock albums of all time. People won't agree with this entire list but there are a lot of great ones in here for you to check out. Here's a link to the list.

https://www.listchallenges.com/100-g...-rock-magazine

If you want to listen to the Blues, check out Robert Johnson. That's where it all started. I can also recommend George Thorgood. I love his music but, more importantly, he does a lot of covers from the blues legends. Check out his music and look at the song writer credits. You'll find a lot of legendary blues players there.

Enjoy your journey. I myself have been on it for about 40 years. Music is a huge part of my life... and I wouldn't have it any other way.
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Old 12-03-2020, 03:17 PM   #85
Al_The_Strange Al_The_Strange is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman Horton View Post
I think you'll find a whole new appreciation once you start paying more attention. You are definitely not alone in this. One thing that I like to do is pull out a new CD and read through all the lyrics before I hear a note. That way, you really are paying attention. If you can, listen through head phones sometimes. Not only can it be a whole new experience but it will also cut out some of the distractions. Finally, give your albums a chance. They don't all sound great right away. Some of them take a few listens.

I can help you out in a couple of areas. Classic Rock magazine out of England, I think, put out a magazine of the 100 best rock albums of all time. People won't agree with this entire list but there are a lot of great ones in here for you to check out. Here's a link to the list.

https://www.listchallenges.com/100-g...-rock-magazine

If you want to listen to the Blues, check out Robert Johnson. That's where it all started. I can also recommend George Thorgood. I love his music but, more importantly, he does a lot of covers from the blues legends. Check out his music and look at the song writer credits. You'll find a lot of legendary blues players there.

Enjoy your journey. I myself have been on it for about 40 years. Music is a huge part of my life... and I wouldn't have it any other way.
These are good tips I'll try and put into practice. I used to do more distraction-free listening when I was a kid, so I figure it'll be more valuable to go back into that mindset.

I have rocked out to George Thorogood's greatest hits album a few times before. Will likely dig into his (and other groups') studio albums. Blues is one of my bigger blind spots, so I will make sure to give Johnson and other guys some spins too.

And I'll certainly check out the list when I can. I'm curious to see how many I may have heard before. Thank you for all the good info!
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Old 12-03-2020, 04:35 PM   #86
fighthefutureofhd fighthefutureofhd is offline
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When it comes to sad and depressing songs, it's always the bright and chipper/slightly melancholy ones that I gravitate to. The songs are not really down or anything. They're sometimes moody, but usually have a punch to them and rock out. I gravitate to these songs a lot, actually. Being clinically depressed and anxious for 11 years will do some real sh-t to your body and your soul. Not to mention your mood.

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Originally Posted by The Great Owl View Post
I don't usually pay mind to newer mixes of classic albums, but I love producer Tony Visconti's 2019 mix of David Bowie's Space Oddity. The title song sounds insanely immersive now. The rest of the tracks on the album do not sound quite as “folksy” as they did on the original mix...and that's a good thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEfH...zuPn_TLrRLKX-A

The below deep cut from the album now sounds almost as though it could have gone on the Ziggy Stardust album...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKF6...RLKX-A&index=4

Anytime I see this song mentioned, I am reminded of the version Natalie Merchant did for her Live in Concert release. It was the only version of Space Oddity I had heard for years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stvn1974 View Post
When it comes to music there is Edie Brickell and New Bohemians/College Rock and then everyone else who isn't as talented. Or rather makes one gouge their eyes out.
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Originally Posted by Steelmaker View Post
Fixed it for both of you.
Fixed it for the three of you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by stvn1974 View Post
When it comes to music there is Edie Brickell and New Bohemians/College Rock and then everyone else who isn't as talented. Or rather makes one gouge their eyes out.
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Originally Posted by Al_The_Strange View Post
Fixed it for all mankind.
I fixed it for infinity. No take backs.
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Old 12-03-2020, 07:09 PM   #87
Hitman Horton Hitman Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al_The_Strange View Post
These are good tips I'll try and put into practice. I used to do more distraction-free listening when I was a kid, so I figure it'll be more valuable to go back into that mindset.

I have rocked out to George Thorogood's greatest hits album a few times before. Will likely dig into his (and other groups') studio albums. Blues is one of my bigger blind spots, so I will make sure to give Johnson and other guys some spins too.

And I'll certainly check out the list when I can. I'm curious to see how many I may have heard before. Thank you for all the good info!
I'm always willing to help somebody discover music. At times, it was the only real friend I had...and I was fine with that. When you mentioned classic rock, I immediately thought of that list. It's a pretty good one. I have a lot of the albums but not all of them. As far as the blues, George will lead you to some great legends. For example, One Bourbon, One Scotch And One Beer is actually a John Lee Hooker song. That's just one but there's lots more. Finally, if you're looking for a good reason to really start paying attention, go here.

https://www.trans-siberian.com/

They're most known for their Christmas trilogy. Three concept albums with a Christmas theme. Go to the discography and click on an album and you can read the story that the album is based on. The stories are long, but totally worth it. After you've read the story, you can listen to the music and enjoy the story all over again. Enjoy!!
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Old 12-05-2020, 03:39 PM   #88
Al_The_Strange Al_The_Strange is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman Horton View Post
I'm always willing to help somebody discover music. At times, it was the only real friend I had...and I was fine with that. When you mentioned classic rock, I immediately thought of that list. It's a pretty good one. I have a lot of the albums but not all of them. As far as the blues, George will lead you to some great legends. For example, One Bourbon, One Scotch And One Beer is actually a John Lee Hooker song. That's just one but there's lots more. Finally, if you're looking for a good reason to really start paying attention, go here.

https://www.trans-siberian.com/

They're most known for their Christmas trilogy. Three concept albums with a Christmas theme. Go to the discography and click on an album and you can read the story that the album is based on. The stories are long, but totally worth it. After you've read the story, you can listen to the music and enjoy the story all over again. Enjoy!!
Oh cool, thank you for the link. I have listened to the Christmas trilogy before, but I never knew there were stories behind the albums.

That is another aspect to my goals--to understand the stories albums tell. It's something I rarely took notice of or studied. Heck, if nobody told me NIN's Downward Spiral told a story (with characters nonetheless), I would have probably never discerned it. I seem to take most albums at face value as a collection with singles and filler, but I'm seeing more and more how important it is to judge albums as a whole for overall meaning.

Looks like I have some reading to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fighthefutureofhd View Post
I fixed it for infinity. No take backs.
M'kay. My post back then wasn't serious anyway, "Get Schwifty" is as stupid of a song as it gets, but that's the point.

Last edited by Al_The_Strange; 12-05-2020 at 03:44 PM.
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Old 12-05-2020, 08:52 PM   #89
Moviefan2k4 Moviefan2k4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman Horton View Post
Here's another way of looking at the songs that can be perceived as negative. It may help somebody through a difficult time by listening and knowing that other people have felt the same way. Clearly I don't know what you mean when you say a song "slams people down" but I take it you mean songs that are negative or sad and this is another way to look at it.
I was referring to sad music in general, because too much of it can really depress people and worsen their frame of mind. A little of it can be cathartic, but too much can really drag folks down...and I say that from experience.
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Old 12-05-2020, 09:26 PM   #90
Hitman Horton Hitman Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moviefan2k4 View Post
I was referring to sad music in general, because too much of it can really depress people and worsen their frame of mind. A little of it can be cathartic, but too much can really drag folks down...and I say that from experience.
In this case, I would say that you're placing blame incorrectly. The type of music people listen to is a choice.
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