Best PS Vita Game Deals


Best PS Vita Game Deals, See All the Deals »
Top deals | New deals  
 All countries United States United Kingdom Canada Germany France Spain Italy Australia Japan Mexico
Shinobido 2: Revenge Of Zen (PS Vita)
$29.99
 
Shiren The Wanderer: The Tower Of Fortune And The Dice Of Fate (PS Vita)
$19.01
 
Akiba's Beat (PS Vita)
$19.99
 
Muv-Luv Alternative (PS Vita)
$39.99
 
Punch Line (PS Vita)
$39.65
 
Death Mark (PS Vita)
$34.59
 
Bad Apple Wars (PS Vita)
$25.69
 
Lost Child (PS Vita)
$25.20
 
What's your next favorite movie?
Join our movie community to find out


Image from: Life of Pi (2012)

Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Gaming > PlayStation > PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-25-2013, 01:13 PM   #21
Icemage Icemage is offline
Blu-ray Ninja
 
Jul 2007
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor2010 View Post
I'm wondering this too, since PSN is the only place to get the digital versions, and it doesn't look like they have a pre-order window for the Vita, I'm betting this will be a physical copy with a download code, which would be really redundant if you can't get them for the digital version.
http://blog.us.playstation.com/2013/...iler/#comments

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aram Jabbari, PlayStation
We *absolutely* recognize this is a pressing issue for our fans. We’ll have more info on this early next week.
Thank you for your patience!
(Note: the game comes out next week so this is a terrible answer)

Also, Japan got a physical card release, why would you assume the North American release would be a digital code?
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 05:46 PM   #22
RaijinUT RaijinUT is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
RaijinUT's Avatar
 
Mar 2010
Salt Lake City
140
Send a message via AIM to RaijinUT
Default

Here are the pre-order items in action...

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 05:56 PM   #23
Trogdor2010 Trogdor2010 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Trogdor2010's Avatar
 
Mar 2009
45
266
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icemage View Post
http://blog.us.playstation.com/2013/...iler/#comments


(Note: the game comes out next week so this is a terrible answer)

Also, Japan got a physical card release, why would you assume the North American release would be a digital code?
I'd assume the copy that you pre-ordered is the same as buying a retail copy, only you get a download code to get the pre-order bonuses. I rarely pre-order games, and these don't really convince me enough to go for the physical copy over the digital version. I only got a Vita last month so I'm not familiar with their release schedule, but I assume it's day to date with digital and retail.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 04:01 AM   #24
Icemage Icemage is offline
Blu-ray Ninja
 
Jul 2007
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor2010 View Post
I'd assume the copy that you pre-ordered is the same as buying a retail copy, only you get a download code to get the pre-order bonuses. I rarely pre-order games, and these don't really convince me enough to go for the physical copy over the digital version. I only got a Vita last month so I'm not familiar with their release schedule, but I assume it's day to date with digital and retail.
PlayStation Twitter finally got an answer on bonuses:

https://twitter.com/playstation/stat...60198188728320

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayStation Twitter
Soul Sacrifice news: Pick it up on PSN starting Tuesday to get the Japanese voiceover pack, 2 costumes & 3 magic items. Limited time only!
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 03:17 PM   #25
RaijinUT RaijinUT is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
RaijinUT's Avatar
 
Mar 2010
Salt Lake City
140
Send a message via AIM to RaijinUT
Default

Reviews-

Destructiod 8/10
[Show spoiler]Never gonna give you up

PlayStation Vita owners know a lot about compromise. One has to wait an excruciatingly long time between remarkable, must-have releases, but when those releases come, many would agree the wait was worth it. It's fitting then, that the latest must-have is all about compromise.

Soul Sacrifice asks the player exactly how much they're willing to give up in exchange for raw power -- a question the PS Vita itself embodies so well. My own history with the Vita has indeed seen me surrender much of my patience and goodwill ... but the rewards, such as they are, make up for it.

True to itself, Soul Sacrifice is one such reward.



Soul Sacrifice (PS Vita)
Developer: Marvelous AQL, SCE Japan Studio
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Japan
Released: April 30, 2013 (US), May 3, 2013 (EU)
MSRP: $39.99

Soul Sacrifice begins in less than pleasant circumstances. The world has effectively ended, those left alive in the resultant apocalypse are imprisoned, waiting their turn to be fed to the powerful sorcerer Magusar. As one such prisoner, you have only one chance to escape the dinner bell -- read a sentient journal of one of Magusar's fellow sorcerers, and relive the past to learn a way to defeat him.

The journal, as well as providing commentary and company, serves as a hub from which players can select missions, create a character, and equip new gear. The general structure is very similar to Monster Hunter or Ragnarok Odyssey -- you select missions, complete them, unlock more, and gain power along the way. Missions almost always involve entering a map and killing a certain number of monsters, though there are occasional collection quests to break up the slaughter.

Although each mission is supposed to tell the story of a specific mystery sorcerer, players are free to create a male or female character and choose various facial features, hair styles, and costumes. The character can be changed at any time, allowing one to swap body parts and even genders on a whim. Up to six weapons -- known as "offerings" -- can be equipped on the character sheet page, and as the game progresses, sigils can be worn to boost various stats. Elsewhere in the book, a number of missions in various flavors can be undertaken -- including a series of side-chapters, timed special challenge stages, and a whole list of non-story battles.



Battles are generally simple affairs, though there's a slight tactical bent to proceedings. Equipped weapons can be summoned by pressing a corresponding button, and then used for a limited time until they drain. The strength and duration of each weapon varies depending on the offering, and each one can only be summoned a certain number of times per mission. If the weapon is summoned one too many times, it will break and be lost. However, hidden items in each map can replenish their uses, and they become fully restocked at the end of every stage.

Once a weapon's in play, enemies are attacked by simply hitting the weapon's bound button over and over again. Timing your attacks to coincide with enemy moves can counter said enemies for a one-hit kill, and there's a dodge roll to avoid taking damage. A large part of your success in battle is getting used to the various types of weaponry and how they behave.Weapons taking the form of a giant arm are slow and powerful, some weapons can be launched like mortars or thrown like missiles, and others are used as group or self-healing spells. Further, weapons corresponding to certain elements will do more damage to vulnerable enemy types, and working out which weapons to use, as well as sorting the good ones from the bad, is a big part of the action.

In the world of Soul Sacrifice, monsters are formed from living creatures that were transformed through a nefarious pact, and when a creature has been defeated, it turns back into its original form. Orcs, for example, become dying cats, while a Goblin will transform into a pack of dying rats.



As the former beasts lay dying, players are given the option to save or sacrifice them, and the choice directly effects character development -- saving creatures can boost one's defense, while sacrificing them raises attack power. Victims can be spared or killed in any combination, and as players level up in any given direction, they'll gain access to unique sigils that boost their given path. Players can save more lives to become Divine sorcerers, end them to become Dark, or dish out justice evenly to remain on a Neutral path.

Along the way, players will be defeating boss monsters that once were human sorcerers, and choosing to kill or spare them will result in even bigger boosts. Furthermore, sparing these characters will unlock them as ally characters. Non-story missions can be played with two AI-controlled allies, and they too are subject to the player's mercy -- should an ally fall in battle, players may choose to save them and keep them in the fight, or sacrifice them for a one-shot powerful magic attack that decimates the entire area.



Players are graded on their performance at the end of each mission, and gaining higher clear ranks will result in better offering rewards. Avoiding damage, clearing stages quickly, using strong elements against monsters, and sacrificing large amounts of monsters all contribute to the ranking, and it has to be said that the sacrificial routes are favored more. Again, this is all part of the game's idea of balance -- if you're not prepared to risk someone or something, it's harder to come out on top.

The game loves to reinforce the idea that every action has a consequence. Choosing to spare and sacrifice fellow sorcerers can unlock new mission paths, and may even make your allies abandon you if they disagree with an action. When sacrificing monsters, one can regain weapon uses, but sparing them replenishes some health. If you want to be a defensive character, you'll do so at a direct cost to your offensive power, while a player focused solely on attack strength will be highly vulnerable to enemy blows. Neutrality may be a wise option, but one could end up becoming a master of nothing.

Strangely, however, Soul Sacrifice contradicts its own message by being very lenient in the consequence department. By talking regularly to the Journal, players acquire Lacrima -- a tear-like liquid taken from the book's eyes. Using this liquid, players can rewrite history and ostensibly undo anything. A sacrificed sorcerer can be resurrected, levels in the Divine or Dark path can be rebalanced, and lost weapons may be recovered. Lacrima is acquired in such high volumes that one never runs out, either, meaning that sacrifice, ironically, is temporary and easily undone. It's a shame there couldn't at least be some reward for keeping sacrifices as they are, but sadly it becomes a swift no-brainer to splash on some Lacrima and get your toys back.



Though it may undermine its premise, one sacrifice that can never be reversed is the amount of time a player can so easily sink into the thing. Even though I've been playing Soul Sacrifice for review purposes, the more than thirty hours I've invested in the game have been given up gladly. It's a time sink of addictive proportions, and I've found it difficult to stop playing as I find more weapons, farm duplicates of those weapons to upgrade them, and explore the vast, overwhelming amount of content on offer. That, and trying to unlock new costumes to see what bizarre and twisted raiments appear next.

As enslaving as Soul Sacrifice is, however, it lends itself a bit too well to repetition. There are tons of missions, but after a while, they all get to be a bit samey. I've fought reskinned versions of orcs and goblins to the point of nausea, and there's a regurgitated handful of bosses that keep popping up. Of course, new weapons are always appearing, and the combat is satisfying enough in its high-impact, cathartic button-mashing to make up for it, but one can certainly grow tired of fighting the same old mutant felines.

If one thing truly lets combat down, however, it's the way in which it registers ally attacks. Friendly fire is by far the most excruciating part of battle, as while attacks from one's partners deal no damage, they act exactly like blows from an enemy -- constantly knocking you to the floor and breaking your combos. Melee weapons don't seem to have this problem, but rolling attacks and mortar-like projectiles will send the player flying if they're anywhere near the impact area. It's such a common occurrence that I found myself killing off any character with an abundance of projectiles or boulder-like transformation powers, as their performance on the battlefield was as harmful to my enjoyment as the enemy.



AI-controlled allies are, in general, an ordeal. If they lack the ability to self-heal, they're borderline worthless, as they'll die quickly and cannot be relied upon to stand still for your own group heals even when commanded to. One can expect to spend a lot of time babysitting them if they want to keep them, and you can bet the enemies won't just stand around and let your rescue animations complete. Saving allies also requires you give up a portion of your own life bar, which only doubles the frustration.

My one other major irritation comes in the form of flying creatures, especially those few winged bosses. Although several weapons offer ranged attacks, they are generally too slow and unwieldy to hit some of the faster moving creatures, who happily fly out of range. One particular boss, the Elven Queen, has a nasty habit of backstepping long distances, causing attacks to miss and forcing players to chase her around the map -- a frequent pain, considering a wasted weapon really does mean something in this game. These occurrences don't make for particularly tough battles, but they are nonetheless cause for some under-the-breath cursing.

Even with these annoyances, however, Soul Sacrifice refuses to let its brilliance be drowned out. The otherwise simplistic nature of the combat is bolstered immensely by the little touches of tactics and balance that make this game what it is.



If you yourself happen to fall in battle, you can command your own allies to rescue or sacrifice you. If you're saved, you get up and keep fighting, but if you're sacrificed, you get to remain on the battlefield as a passive-aggressive influence, given a limited ability to raise your friends' attack power and decrease the enemy defenses by poking them on the touch screen. It's a nice touch that, once again, uses the sacrifice premise quite cleverly.

Another cool use of the premise involves the use of Black Rites. These are special, last-ditch attacks that require you give up your own body parts in order to perform a devastatingly powerful attack. Best used against powerful bosses, and only when the chips are down, these spells will deal immense damage at a high cost.

For example, one attack summons a squad of eyeballs that shoot a petrifying laser, but the player has to tear out his or her own eye to use it. For the rest of the battle, and all subsequent missions, vision will be restricted to an obscured tunnel -- an issue that can only be fixed with an application of Lacrima once the initial fight is over. Once again, the easy reset renders a lot of the risk moot, but it can still be a weighty decision, especially if one performs the rite too early in a lengthy fight.



The game can be taken online or played locally in a team of four, allowing for some jolly cooperation. Multiplayer fights play out exactly like a solo fight, with the addition of some fun little chat commands that can be brought up with a pleasantly convenient flick of a touch-screen pop-up.Going online to show off one's acquired moves and costumes is a good laugh in and of itself, and the potential to sacrifice your own friends for personal power is likely to prove a most engrossing aspect of the co-op experience. Unlike similar games, Soul Sacrifice's multiplayer doesn't feel like the main focus, with solo play proving the robust draw, but its inclusion only helps round out the package.

While not the most visually impressive game on the PS Vita, we're looking at a title that's far from ugly. This is helped most by the wickedly twisted character designs, especially in some of the boss monsters, all of which are truly hideous, and even pitiful, to behold. The game has a pleasant little soundtrack of suitable, atmospheric music, and a strong -- albeit limited -- vocal cast that lends a British flavor that seems to be increasing in many Japanese localizations.



Soul Sacrifice, true to its driving idea, is a game of compromises. There's a staggering wealth of content, but it can be tiring in its repetition. Battles are frantic and fun, but can be exhaustingly annoying if you choose the wrong friends. Very much like the game's Lacrima system, however, many of the sacrifices one must make to enjoy the game are negligible in the long run, and there's nothing that should stop one having a damn good laugh and getting utterly hooked on an adventure that really can be played until the Vita's batteries run dry.

And one's battery life may indeed be the greatest sacrifice of them all.

THE VERDICT - SOUL SACRIFICE 8/10
Reviewed by Jim Sterling



IGN- 7.7/10
[Show spoiler]WHO WILL SAVE YOUR SOUL?
→ APRIL 30, 2013 PlayStation Vita may be capable of console-quality gaming, but its largely untapped strength rests in its potential to provide those experiences in commute-friendly, time-sensitive bursts. Soul Sacrifice straddles the line between delivering the depth typically found on console and the on-off-on-again routine of handheld gaming, and the result is something that will likely please Vita owners hungry for a quality, grind-heavy RPG.
Delivered by Mega Man creator Keiji Inafune, Soul Sacrifice suffers from problems endemic to likeminded games in the genre – think Monster Hunter or Phantasy Star Online – but it also does some unique things that help keep it fresh. While it can occasionally bog down in sheer repetition and the rampant overuse of monsters and maps, there’s something inherently and undeniably addicting about Soul Sacrifice.

Player, meet Librom.
Its charm rests, at first, in its presentation and story. Soul Sacrifice tells the tale of an imprisoned mage – your character – who is accompanied in his miserable cell
Soul Sacrifice
APRIL 30, 2013
Soul Sacrifice is a co-op action game full of brutal combat, consequential gameplay choices, and fantasy elements.
→ MUCH MORE
COLIN MORIARTY SAYS
Other Games That Understand Vita
by a strange-looking book. This isn’t some dusty old tome, but a living, breathing entity named Librom, and through Librom, your character will relive apocalyptic events from the past, giving you the skills, information and gusto necessary to escape from your current predicament.
The story is delivered via voice-acted text with few frills to be found – actual cutscenes are exceptionally rare in Soul Sacrifice – and the plot pretty much never stops winding. Virtually every mission, whether on your primary quest or through a slew of side quest paths, is given context in the storyline. The plot can get a little confusing, made all the more muddled by the sheer number of characters you’ll encounter on your journey, but regardless, the fact that there’s a story worth reading at all is a step in the right direction in a sub-genre of RPG that emphasizes grinding, customization, and a whole lot of battling over any sort of meaningful exposition. I found myself skipping the story as I got deeper into the game, not necessarily because it wasn’t interesting, but because I was eager to get back into the fray.
Librom’s voice-acting is expertly delivered, and exploring his many pages is done easily via the Vita’s touch screen. Each and every mission is embedded on Librom’s digital parchment, along with an insane amount of “lore,” touching on enemies, locations, and more. When you’re not in battle in Soul Sacrifice, you’re invariably reading Librom, and developer Comcept has done an amazing job of making this unusual menu scheme work. It would be easy to feel confined by such a system, but Librom’s sheets are vast and easy to navigate, and paging through with regularity is integral to your success.

When you get out of Librom and onto the field of battle, however, Soul Sacrifice becomes a little more of a typical third-person action RPG. Combat lacks any sort of verticality here, however. In other words: you can’t jump, making fights feel a bit more stringent and a little less arcadey than similar games like Ragnarok Odyssey.
Once I got used to the way Soul Sacrifice feels, however, it was easy to get pulled into its satisfying scoring and loot systems as I delved deeper and deeper into Librom’s story. Players can fight with Offerings they earn after each battle, rummaging through and organizing them to create various permutations that will best fit the desired play-style. For instance, in your six available Offering slots, you’ll likely want to have some curative moves, perhaps a missile-based attack, and some melee strikes that take advantage of different enemies’ weaknesses. There’s considerable depth here, whether you’re looking to get up close and personal with the monsters you fight, keep a safe distance and launch spells from afar, or just about anything in between. Offerings can be upgraded and combined, too, opening up yet another door through which you can easily get lost in customizing bliss.
The actual act of fighting with these Offerings is also quite enjoyable, although action is occasionally held back by a sometimes-wonky lock-on system. If you’re fighting multiple enemies, you may have a difficult time locking onto the enemy you actually want to go after, and the camera will bug out if you’re stuck in a corner with an enemy breathing down your neck. But these problems aren’t encountered often enough that they ruin the experience.

Your strength comes at a serious cost.
Indeed, Soul Sacrifice plays very well, with a combination of Vita’s dual analog sticks, face buttons, triggers and only the rare use of the touch screen combining to make for an easy-to-understand, easy-to-use control scheme. You may tire of fighting the same enemies over and over again, but Soul Sacrifice does enough right to make such a complaint nothing more than an aside.
At the crux of Soul Sacrifice’s combat system – its namesake, in fact – is your character’s ability to manipulate the souls of those around him. This adds an extra dynamic to Soul Sacrifice that sets it apart from its more trite and boring contemporaries. In short, when an enemy is defeated, you can opt to assimilate his or her soul for the gain of extra life power or extra magic power. Sometimes, one comes to the detriment of the other, forcing you to choose what’s more important to you. This represents the center of Soul Sacrifice’s leveling system, one that does away with the statistical minutiae I admittedly prefer and instead focuses almost entirely on this binary feature. I chose to build my character evenly; at the time of this review, my character is level 28 in both categories, for a combined level of 56. But you can go all-in with one or the other or create a different sort of build that emphasizes magic over life or vice-versa.
Furthering the open-ended feel of Soul Sacrifice are the choices you make in who you save and who you sacrifice at the end of battles. Virtually every boss enemy is, in reality, nothing more than a suffering human, and you can save or kill just about any person you meet to benefit your two ever-dueling statistics. Cooler yet, saved characters will join your party as AI allies that you can bring into battle. In other words, be very careful with the choices you’re making, because they most certainly matter. Meaningful consequences like these are very rarely a bad thing.

Further character customization comes by way of powerful Black Rite attack spells, which represent the ultimate sacrifices. For instance, calling down flames on your foes will also burn you, halving your defense. Summoning a powerful set of ungodly melee weapons will make quick work of your foes, but also cause you to go mostly blind. This is an expertly executed cost/benefit system: it has real ramifications if used too often, especially because you’ll need to spend rare in-game currency called Lacrima to undo said ill-effects.
Soul Sacrifice can be played entirely alone – I spent a vast, vast majority of my time playing on my own – but if you want to get online (or ad hoc via wifi) and play, you can do that too. Matchmaking options are surprisingly fluid, and it’s easy to invite some friends to a match. Gameplay is identical whether you’re by yourself or with friends (except that you're limited to a set of missions known as Avalon Pacts), and this is where Soul Sacrifice will likely find its long-term following.

How will you customize your character?
My in-game clock has me somewhere north of 20 hours in Soul Sacrifice. And speaking of clocks, I got mine cleaned as I did battle with the final boss, letting me know that I have more work to do. Even with this review behind me, I’m going to do that work, complete the uncompleted side quests and take on the final boss anew, because there's something admittedly alluring about Soul Sacrifice, even if it isn't Vita's killer app.




Action RPGs like Soul Sacrifice are often mocked for their repetitious nature, and a lot of that criticism is deserved. But while it falls prey to the same pitfalls as many of its contemporaries (Is it really that hard to have a greater variety of maps and enemies?), Soul Sacrifice does so much so well that its action bears a good deal of repeating. Whether you're playing for minutes or hours at a time, it's an addictive and rewarding experience.


Gamesradar- 3.5/5
[Show spoiler]Any time there’s mention of “high fantasy” these days, someone’s bound to roll their eyes and scoff. Tolkein’s core of orcs, elves, and magic has been so thoroughly tapped by the last 70 years of pop culture as to lose any connection to its imaginative roots. So when something comes along that portrays goblins as melting rat-demons, it tends to stand out. Soul Sacrifice comes from a supergroup of Japanese video game veterans and brings with it one of the strangest and most creatively rich worlds yet seen in this thematic realm--making it all the more frustrating that the game lacks a compelling story and fails to realize its full potential.

Soul Sacrifice opens in first-person perspective, placing you in the body of a nameless, faceless prisoner in a grisly cage of skulls and bones. After witnessing the brutal sacrifice of another similarly imprisoned fellow, the silent protagonist finds a living book, named Librom. He serves as your companion, guiding you through his pages, teaching you the ways of sorcery and combat so that you can become powerful enough to escape your infernal prison. Standing as one of the stranger video game introductions, it establishes a dark tone for this very adult real-time RPG.


"...one of the strangest and most creatively rich worlds yet seen in this thematic realm."
When thumbing Librom’s pages, you’ll have the opportunity to relive memories of the book’s author. These take the form of Phantom Quests, most of which revolve around finding and killing monsters in a given area. Upon death, enemies can either be saved or sacrificed, which will help boost defensive stats and offensive stats respectively. Over time, these choices will have more significant effects, and influence the kinds of magic and bonuses you can use.

The moral themes on display here are largely superficial, but the Save/Sacrifice mechanic leads to some pretty interesting gameplay situations. Sacrificing other party members, for example, will trigger an incredibly powerful spell that can turn the tide in any one of the game’s many difficult boss battles. Conversely, saving someone mid-battle will cost half your health, but give you a kind of insurance policy should you need reviving yourself.

If you surround yourself with more evil party members, they're much more likely to sacrifice your fallen body to fuel their own powerful magic. Battles can be won or lost simply by carefully managing these dynamics, and it’s quite possibly one of the few moral choice systems in games that bring out some excellent gameplay without contributing to the plot in any meaningful way.


"In fact, Soul Sacrifice’s entire narrative is dull and lackluster."
In fact, Soul Sacrifice’s entire narrative is dull and lackluster. There are few, if any, real characters and very little that would resemble traditional storytelling arcs. Flipping through Librom’s pages, all you’ll hear is a grating, monotone voice-over as wiggly letters scrawl across the screen. Occasionally you’ll be treated to some pretty art, but the lion’s share of the exposition consists of listening to a mediocre voice actor work his way through an excruciatingly overwritten mess.

For many, that’s going to be a deal-breaker. If you do choose to stick around for the full 30+ hours, you’ll find one of the most visually inspired games in recent memory. Richly detailed environments, inventive art direction, and disturbing monster design, all feel like they are pulled from the more twisted nightmares of Tim Burton. The semi-mythological creatures you’ll face are truly some of the more bizarre things you’ll ever see, and they represent one of the few unique interpretations of mythological fiends. Levels are equally gorgeous, and have enough variety that combat won’t get old for some time.

That’s great too, because combat is where you’ll be spending a fair chunk of time. Once again, breaking with its genre conventions, you’ll be fighting nightmarish beasts in real time. As a sorcerer, you’ll have six slots to equip “offerings," or items whose power you tap to cast spells. Basic offerings can be boosted and fused permitting more uses and different effects, which adds a lot of diversity. There are ranged attacks, healing techniques, and plenty of moves that can open enemies up to additional attacks. Chaining techniques with those of either your AI or player companions will help you distract, stun, and ultimately kill any hellions that may cross your path. These combat mechanics can be elegantly subtle and remarkably satisfying, especially when other players enter the mix. The effect is to create a consistently engaging system that doesn’t get stale after only a few rounds.


"...at the end of the day, you’re still just chasing down evil things and looting their bodies."
Some of the larger foes will require a lot of work, great timing, and a fair amount of skill to bring down. At times, the difficulty curve can get pretty unforgiving, telling you that it’s time to either grind easier mobs or change up your strategy. Unfortunately, the linear nature of the game means that if you’re not strong enough to progress, you can’t really do anything but grind levels and gear. During the last third of the game, you’ll be stopping every other battle or so to backtrack and level.

Those frustrations aside, felling truly mighty leviathans never ceases to make you feel awesome. It can be frustrating to lose time and time again, especially when some battles run upwards of 15 minutes--but when you do finally get everything to click into place, you’ll see the fruits of your labor.

Soul Sacrifice is probably best described as an M-rated Monster Hunter; even with all of its nifty mechanics and unique art direction, at the end of the day, you’re still just chasing down evil things and looting their bodies. There’s a strong element of cooperative play with an excellent twist that will surely be the death of many a friendships, and plenty of character customization to build up your own magic-wielding badass. The game’s got plenty of great content, especially if you can convince a few others to take that step with you, but if you’re holding your breath for a great story, you’re almost certainly going to be disappointed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 03:18 PM   #26
RaijinUT RaijinUT is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
RaijinUT's Avatar
 
Mar 2010
Salt Lake City
140
Send a message via AIM to RaijinUT
Default

CVG- 8.5/10
[Show spoiler]Soul Sacrifice starts as it means to go on - by letting you launch a firework display of various magical spells at a boss the size of a small island.

Oh, and by being so bastard-hard that, should you even be victorious, your character will still most certainly be burnt to a crisp.


The clue is in the title; the back-of-the-box selling point for this hardcore action RPGs is that you'll need to make personal sacrifices if you want to unleash your full potential - and we don't just mean chocolate, ceremonial goats or your social life (though the latter make come under strain if you plan on mastering Soul Sacrifice).
The true sacrifices you'll make in this title are limbs, skin, maybe even an eye or two. Send one of those appendages to the virtual slaughter house and your sorcerer will unleash a screen-filling blast of combustible win that will eat a massive wad of health from even the hardiest of foes. These powers are called Black Rites, and they're a perfect example of the delicate risk / reward balancing act at the core of Soul Sacrifice's battle system.

Performing Black Rites burdens you with a permanent handicap (halving your defence, say) that can only be reversed by spending copious amounts of 'lacrima' - the game's magic currency. Considering you'll also need reserves of lacrima to maintain your arsenal of offensive and defensive spells, deciding when to deploy a Black Rite is of huge tactical importance.

It's an excellent system, made more risky by the deliberately vague indications of your enemies' remaining health (they simply glow either green, yellow or red meaning you can never be /quite/ sure whether your last-ditch attempt at victory will be successful).
But this won't be your only conundrum; levelling-up your sorcerer is also a moral dilemma in miniature. Sparing defeated enemies will boost your defence stats and hit points, yet sacrificing them will strengthen offensive abilities. It's a novel approach to character building; forgoing the 'skill tree' model of most RPGs in favour of a more immediate system of character-by-character conundrums. It's also a brilliantly flexible approach; encouraging experimentation and allowing you to try separate strategies without having to build an entirely new character.

So what to do when you've built a worthy sorcerer? You take them online into Soul Sacrifice's excellent four-player co-op, that's what. Here is where specialised magic users really come up trumps, where co-ordinated gangs of fireball-flinging mates can team up and take down some splendidly designed monstrosities. The best bit? You can sacrifice friends too.

Online provides the perfect chance to experiment with different spell combinations and test for enemy weaknesses while other players can cover for you if everything goes south. Of course, they could choose to sacrifice you if you prove to be more use as a fleshy projectile than as a sorcerer.

If you happen to be sacrificed by so-called friends, then there is a chance to get involved. While hovering around in 'ghost mode' you can use PS Vita's touch screen to lower enemy defences or boost your party's attack power.
Soul Sacrifice's combat is so balanced, so deep and packed with graphical flair that any time outside of boss fights feels a little pedestrian, and sadly there's plenty of narrative padding, particularly in single player mode.

Each mission is preceded by a lengthy bout of histrionic waffle presented by a talking book who also acts as your in-game guide. He's called Librom and is bursting at the seams with optional lore (and sometimes useful info on enemy weak spots). Sadly, Librom's priority seems to be bending your ear every five minutes. The text-based exposition feels lazy in comparison to the vividly realised characters, monsters and spells. But it's a testament to the quality of Soul Sacrifice that its over-theatrical story is its only real flaw. The PS Vita finally has an RPG you can get your number-crunching teeth into; a game that offers both strategic depth with seemingly endless customisation of spells and battle load outs, while simultaneously feeding you a smooth, responsive battle system that is at once tactile and visually spectacular.

Considering it was partly conceived by former Capcom star developer Keiji Inafune, it is perhaps expected that Soul Sacrifice is unapologetically hardcore and initially hard to penetrate. You'll die lots at first, but stick with it and you'll find Soul Sacrifice is a shining example of the handheld action RPG.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 12:24 AM   #27
Trogdor2010 Trogdor2010 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Trogdor2010's Avatar
 
Mar 2009
45
266
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icemage View Post
PlayStation Twitter finally got an answer on bonuses:

https://twitter.com/playstation/stat...60198188728320
Neato! There is a slight discount on the digital version as well. ($35.99)

I'm a little peeved that a big Playstation sale happens on the day this game comes out. I'll make up my mind when I'm at home.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 03:49 AM   #28
ngkf7 ngkf7 is offline
Special Member
 
ngkf7's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Baltimore, MD
4
161
104
1
54
Default

I really really wanted to like this demo. And I do enjoy it. But is the whole game quick missions with repetitive monster fights? I haven't even finished the demo...
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2013, 04:31 PM   #29
Icemage Icemage is offline
Blu-ray Ninja
 
Jul 2007
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ngkf7 View Post
I really really wanted to like this demo. And I do enjoy it. But is the whole game quick missions with repetitive monster fights? I haven't even finished the demo...
The gameplay is pretty much a boss rush mode aside from the occasional exploration or extermination mission. It's a portable game, designed to be played in small bite sized chunks.

The game revolves around resource management and deciding how to develop your powers. You can only go into battle with 6 spells equipped, and all spells have a limited number of uses before they break, so choosing and upgrading the right abilities to suit your play style and mission parameters is critical to passing the higher missions.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2013, 01:38 AM   #30
Grim Reaper Grim Reaper is offline
Blu-ray Duke
 
Grim Reaper's Avatar
 
Jun 2006
Let Me In!
365
1791
12
Default

Did anybody else have an issue with the online pass not downloading? It shows in the store that it was used. But, it does not give me the option to download it. It's not even in my download list. The game is new. I got it in the buy 2 get 1 free deal that target has going this week.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2013, 03:00 PM   #31
nremdn nremdn is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
nremdn's Avatar
 
Jun 2009
Middle TN
225
4
Send a message via AIM to nremdn
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grim Reaper View Post
Did anybody else have an issue with the online pass not downloading? It shows in the store that it was used. But, it does not give me the option to download it. It's not even in my download list. The game is new. I got it in the buy 2 get 1 free deal that target has going this week.
Hmm that's strange, I know RaijinUT and I didn't have any issues. I would keep trying from both Vita and PS3 and if you still have no luck give Sony a call. It's good fun online when you link up with a good group.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2013, 03:03 PM   #32
Grim Reaper Grim Reaper is offline
Blu-ray Duke
 
Grim Reaper's Avatar
 
Jun 2006
Let Me In!
365
1791
12
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nremdn View Post
Hmm that's strange, I know RaijinUT and I didn't have any issues. I would keep trying from both Vita and PS3 and if you still have no luck give Sony a call. It's good fun online when you link up with a good group.
i havent checked my ps3 yet. since i didnt use it for a few days.

*edit*
not in the download list on the ps3...

*edit2*
i cant even download it from the ps3 at all.

*edit3*
i happen to come across this over at the playstation forum.

http://community.us.playstation.com/.../td-p/40315013

Last edited by Grim Reaper; 06-04-2013 at 03:31 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2013, 08:48 PM   #33
Trogdor2010 Trogdor2010 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Trogdor2010's Avatar
 
Mar 2009
45
266
Default

I've got this last night, and so far it's pretty good.

I've noticed though that the textures don't appear as high resolution as I remembered. Not a deal breaker, but I remember the demo looking better.

I am a little peeved that I have to use black rites spells in order to effectively defeat the game's monsters, which from the looks of it, seems that I have limited amount of uses for black rites in the game. I wouldn't mind abusing it if it didn't take too much of that tear drop magic in the game. I haven't tried CO-OP but it looks like it's fun.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2013, 10:05 PM   #34
RaijinUT RaijinUT is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
RaijinUT's Avatar
 
Mar 2010
Salt Lake City
140
Send a message via AIM to RaijinUT
Default

You don't need to the Black Rites to beat guys... but they can be very helpful in doing so.

Also, if anyone is interested in playing co-op, then add nremdn and I. We usually play on Sunday and are lvl 100-85.

We could use some good people to finish off some of the higher quests.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 06:40 AM   #35
Trogdor2010 Trogdor2010 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Trogdor2010's Avatar
 
Mar 2009
45
266
Default

I think I fugured out how to take them out without needing Black Rites. I just needed to change my playstyle and let allies do some of the dirty work.

I think I'm at lvl 8/ lvl 14 if I recall, and I think I mostly tend to play small sessions, so i think It'll be a while before I can reach that high.

I think I'll add you anyways since you're on my steam friends.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 05:07 PM   #36
nremdn nremdn is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
nremdn's Avatar
 
Jun 2009
Middle TN
225
4
Send a message via AIM to nremdn
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor2010 View Post
I think I fugured out how to take them out without needing Black Rites. I just needed to change my playstyle and let allies do some of the dirty work.

I think I'm at lvl 8/ lvl 14 if I recall, and I think I mostly tend to play small sessions, so i think It'll be a while before I can reach that high.

I think I'll add you anyways since you're on my steam friends.
Get back in touch when you get some more power LOL you would be the equivalent of a gnat to the later Avalon Pacts. It really doesn't take that long to level up.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2013, 11:07 PM   #37
Psybits Psybits is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Psybits's Avatar
 
Jul 2009
8
305
2
Default

so I was looking around the PSN store last night and saw that all the DLC except the Japanese Voice overs and 1 other are free...have they always been or are they normally free?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2013, 11:54 PM   #38
PA_Kid PA_Kid is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Jan 2008
Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
Default

Yup - all free. It's been pretty cool post launch support.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2013, 12:20 AM   #39
Psybits Psybits is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Psybits's Avatar
 
Jul 2009
8
305
2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PA_Kid View Post
Yup - all free. It's been pretty cool post launch support.
cool! thanks for the reply
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 09:00 PM   #40
gatchaman2025 gatchaman2025 is offline
Active Member
 
gatchaman2025's Avatar
 
Jul 2009
Ridge, NY
9
446
245
138
134
1
Thumbs up

Also I read that the game will be free for + Members today on the store! saw this on Joystiq today. They also said Odd World: A Strangers Wrath as well.

Last edited by gatchaman2025; 11-05-2013 at 09:07 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Gaming > PlayStation > PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:52 PM.