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Old 08-29-2017, 09:33 PM   #161
zrdb zrdb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vilya View Post
Not everyone has an audiophile's critical listening skills. Personally, 320kps MP3s sound good to me and my listening equipment is not "crap", but I admit that my age and my former career on the railroad has not helped my hearing.

It seems that the last time I downloaded a one-hit wonder of a song from Amazon that it was offered as a 256kps (approximately) MP3. I imagine Amazon sells quite a few such downloads, therefore the quality must be satisfactory to most of their customers.
I've trained myself so that I can tell the difference between mp3shit and lossless formats. Mp3 shit was good for when storage space went for a premium price but in the last couple of years storage is dirt cheap so it no longer applies.
Flac is pretty much the de facto standard these days, there's just no excuse for using an outdated codec anymore.
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Old 08-29-2017, 10:09 PM   #162
Lord_Bigglesworth Lord_Bigglesworth is offline
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Yes, I'm real sure all the a/v corporations and movie studios of the world will just all collectively decide "Hey, I think we've all made enough money, let's stop developing new technologies and just sit on what we've got."
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Old 09-26-2017, 12:25 AM   #163
Ed Gauthier Ed Gauthier is offline
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Originally Posted by danny24 View Post
...those saying 4k UHD will be the last home video format, no it won't, it would be either 8k or 10k UHD Blu-ray. As with everything in life technology evolves and I don't know what can be better than 10k resolution, that would be the limit...
Fine, but apparently 6k got skipped over somewhere along the line, so instead of dwelling on 8k maybe they'll likewise skip it and go straight to 10k. But Japan is already into 8k? So what? Japan is crazy, anyway.

Meanwhile, that guy making the earlier posts in this thread is right - the extent of human eyeball power washes out around 40% tops and would only barely appreciate the 4k to 8k difference when seated ridiculously close to a ridiculously large home screen. Consumerism's goals do not cancel out human physics.

Sure, let future versions go to 10k... why not 40k or 400k? But mankind's vision will still be locked back where it is now, just barely noting a tiny diff between 4k and 8k. The rest, as they used to say, is all making bucks from the ballyhoo.
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Old 09-28-2017, 10:15 AM   #164
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8 is the next logical step up from 4. It's another factor of 400% increase.

But I think at this point you run into diminishing returns from the source material available. (Not to mention streaming, ick)

HFR needs to be the next logical step, and improved display technology rather than marketing gimmicks.

Unless you have a huge set, the current leap is from HDR and improved compression. Not resolution IMO.
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Old 07-07-2018, 10:11 AM   #165
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If 4k is already here, you can rest assured 8k (or beyond) will arrive in the future.

It does sound hard to believe (it's hard to believe something you've never seen), but it's true.

Companies aren't going to suddenly stop raising resolutions forever and end with 4k. That would be absurd.

The TV of the future will probably be beyond 8k, and be 3D as well. I doubt the screen will even be physical, most likely it'll be a hologram or something similar.

With all the brands competing in the TV, phone, computer, etc, arena, you can rest assured they will keep releasing better technologies to keep customers coming back to them.
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Old 07-07-2018, 11:32 AM   #166
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How would 8K even be beneficial as a home media format? I barely see much of a difference in 4K compared to regular Blu-ray other than the HDR. It makes sense to master in 4K or above, but I think 4K is more than enough for a home video format. I thought even post filming, most Hollywood movies are not even mastered in resolutions above 2K or 4K most of the time anyway.
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Old 07-07-2018, 11:37 AM   #167
stonesfan129 stonesfan129 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zrdb View Post
I've trained myself so that I can tell the difference between mp3shit and lossless formats. Mp3 shit was good for when storage space went for a premium price but in the last couple of years storage is dirt cheap so it no longer applies.
Flac is pretty much the de facto standard these days, there's just no excuse for using an outdated codec anymore.
I call BS. Unless the bitrate is low (like under 192kbps), the difference between a track in WAV/AIFF/FLAC/ALAC and MP3 encoded with a decent encoder like LAME is very difficult to tell without top notch equipment and golden ears. It gets even harder when you use a newer, more efficient codec like iTunes AAC or Opus.
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Old 10-24-2018, 06:58 PM   #168
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The TVís have arrived here:

https://www.richersounds.com/sams-qe...ent=2018-10-24
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Old 11-08-2018, 09:11 PM   #169
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If there is money to made and there is an audience, someone will try.

The thing is (and I know some people will debate this), we are pretty much getting master copies of films on 4K UHD. Unless we are talking about a 70mm print, you're just not going to get anymore detail out of a movie. After countless formats, we've finally peaked and are getting pretty much an identical experience at home that we would in theaters.

Rather than 8k, I think you're going to see more of a focus on increased frame rates, brighter screens, high color depth, etc.
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Old 11-08-2018, 09:58 PM   #170
AdubW1982 AdubW1982 is offline
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Awesome! Wish it wasn't so expensive.
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:05 PM   #171
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8K at home is so silly. Keep in mind that 4K DCP, which is only slightly larger than consumer 4K, is considered good enough for 40 foot wide movie theater screens. But yeah, I’m sure our 65” screens are going to benefit from 4x that resolution.
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Old 11-19-2018, 05:11 PM   #172
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8K streaming content will happen for sure. 8K physical media, can't see it happening without a new format that no-one in their right mind is gonna pay millions to develop while existing replication facilities are closing down all over the place. 8K TV broadcasts, probably never outside of the Far East.
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Old 11-19-2018, 05:58 PM   #173
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The thing with 8K displays is that the uptick in resolution won't be the most interesting aspect of them, with 4K it's HDR and a wider colour gamut. We can expect that and ultra high luminace, so we'll see displays hitting 4,000 to 10,000 nits.

But as a physical format, I don't see it happening.
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Old 11-19-2018, 06:27 PM   #174
Geoff D Geoff D is offline
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The thing with HDR is that 10K nits is a fundamental part of the PQ-derived HDR spec already so that aspect won't change on a technical level at source, it's the day-to-day mastering and display of such content that will follow in due time whether 8K rez is a thing or not. Though I doubt that 10K-nit consumer displays will become a reality due to the amount of eco-warrior-baiting power that they'll draw, 4K nits I can see happening though.

What UHD Phase 2 is really concentrating on is higher frame rates because when you have an image that's practically groaning under the weight of its own pixels then the motion resolution of conventional 24fps shot with a 180-degree shutter just isn't enough any more, and with brighter displays already exacerbating 24p motion judder (owing to the way that brighter images enhance the perceptual sharpness of the images which makes their lack of motion resolution stand out more) then this could become a problem with 8K HDR going forward. People noted the same thing with the 8K-rez 10K-nit prototypes on show at CES at the start of the year, amazing images but motion handling was awful.
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Old Yesterday, 03:42 AM   #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff D View Post
The thing with HDR is that 10K nits is a fundamental part of the PQ-derived HDR spec already so that aspect won't change on a technical level at source, it's the day-to-day mastering and display of such content that will follow in due time whether 8K rez is a thing or not. Though I doubt that 10K-nit consumer displays will become a reality due to the amount of eco-warrior-baiting power that they'll draw, 4K nits I can see happening though.

What UHD Phase 2 is really concentrating on is higher frame rates because when you have an image that's practically groaning under the weight of its own pixels then the motion resolution of conventional 24fps shot with a 180-degree shutter just isn't enough any more, and with brighter displays already exacerbating 24p motion judder (owing to the way that brighter images enhance the perceptual sharpness of the images which makes their lack of motion resolution stand out more) then this could become a problem with 8K HDR going forward. People noted the same thing with the 8K-rez 10K-nit prototypes on show at CES at the start of the year, amazing images but motion handling was awful.
Speaking of eco-warrior-baiting power, consider the necessary GPU power to keep that many pixels in motion at a high FPS. A lot of us are quite familiar with VR environments, one developer found they had to limit the maximum FPS and reduce the res from 8K to 5K to make the environment practical given current performance GPU's. As you you know a Dell 8K computer display use a pair of high performance graphic cards to drive it. Hows that going to be size and energy viable anytime soon for a home media format?
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