Best Blu-ray Movie Deals


Best Blu-ray Movie Deals, See All the Deals »
Top deals | New deals  
 All countries United States United Kingdom Canada Germany France Spain Italy Australia Netherlands Japan Mexico
Children of the Corn 4K (Blu-ray)
$34.99
4 hrs ago
High Sierra (Blu-ray)
$27.99
1 hr ago
Indiana Jones: 4-Movie Collection 4K (Blu-ray)
$63.50
 
Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins 4K (Blu-ray)
$27.99
 
Small Soldiers (Blu-ray)
$6.96
16 hrs ago
The Incredible Shrinking Man (Blu-ray)
$27.99
1 day ago
Back to the Future: The Ultimate Trilogy 4K (Blu-ray)
$29.99
 
The Phantasm Sphere Collection (Blu-ray)
$99.99
 
Perfect Blue (Blu-ray)
$21.99
 
The Haunting: 2-Series Collection (Blu-ray)
$39.95
1 day ago
Cold War Creatures: Four Films from Sam Katzman (Blu-ray)
$79.99
2 hrs ago
Onibaba (Blu-ray)
$27.99
17 hrs ago
What's your next favorite movie?
Join our movie community to find out


Image from: Life of Pi (2012)

Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Audio > Speakers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-31-2009, 10:36 AM   #81
V0RB!5 V0RB!5 is offline
New Member
 
May 2009
Default

yeah whats funny is on the whole thing of people saying oh look it has 1000watts of power they dont know what they are talking about bcoz proof is my 100 watt amp puts out better louder sound then my 800watt one
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2009, 10:37 AM   #82
V0RB!5 V0RB!5 is offline
New Member
 
May 2009
Default

r
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2009, 06:07 PM   #83
jomari jomari is offline
Moderator
 
jomari's Avatar
 
Nov 2007
18
2
2
Default

lemme take a crack at this krazey...

Quote:
Originally Posted by krazeyeyez View Post
ok i think i understand as much as i can and ever will regarding ohms, let me just ask.... since a receiver that can power a 4 ohm speaker can also power a 6 or an 8, why would it not have all those options available?
the reason is because most receivers components arent built to handle such resistance when it comes to reaching 4 ohms. you'd find a number of receivers that can handle 6 or 8 because they are relatively 'safe' in regards to handling it, but not as hard as 4 ohms.

Quote:
And if this is not a set in stone number and a klipsch speaker that says 8 ohms can dip as low as 2 (taken from another thread), does this means at times your receiver is easy going and at times its stressing regardless of volume or is this in response to volume?
What we're dealing with here is a matter of different variables. the most obvious ones would be
- how loud the speakers playing
- how much resistance is occuring between the speaker and the reciever and
- how long its being played.

If all speakers are to play 'just a pink/white noise' at a constant level, without 'bangs or booms' or even a very impressive pipe organ hitting 13hz, then we wouldnt have to worry too much about it.

The dynamics of certain tracks can be easy to handle on certain AVR's or separates, but cant do on another. This is why clipping occurs, and/or it hits the protection mode.

Like a machine, if you push it too hard, you wouldnt get the best results you want at certain stress points, as you would get with it in a 'regular' mode. There isnt a overdrive button we can push to make it perform better. Thats why we have more expensive gear out there that can handle 4ohms, and work from there.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2009, 09:40 PM   #84
browndk26 browndk26 is offline
Senior Member
 
browndk26's Avatar
 
Dec 2008
Louisville, KY
10
Default

So sensitivity isn't really important. Not a deal breaker between 2 speakers.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2009, 09:49 PM   #85
Johnny Vinyl Johnny Vinyl is offline
Moderator
 
Johnny Vinyl's Avatar
 
Jul 2007
At the crossroad of Analogue Dr & 2CH Ave
19
205
7
3
8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by browndk26 View Post
So sensitivity isn't really important. Not a deal breaker between 2 speakers.
It's not important, to a point, and it shouldn't deter you from buying what you want. All you need to remember is that with a speaker like mine, for instance, who's sensitivity is rated at 87db (which is low) you will need more power to drive them to an equal level of sound as compared to a high sensitivity rated speaker.

If your AVR has a really low power rating per channel, then choosing a speaker with a high sensitivity rating makes good sense. In such a scenario the introduction of a seperate power amplifier would make sense as its power is usually true to stated specs (unlike AVR's).

John
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2009, 10:25 PM   #86
solarrdadd solarrdadd is offline
Blu-ray Prince
 
solarrdadd's Avatar
 
Jul 2008
Virginia
255
185
1314
4
42
316
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John72953 View Post
It's not important, to a point, and it shouldn't deter you from buying what you want. All you need to remember is that with a speaker like mine, for instance, who's sensitivity is rated at 87db (which is low) you will need more power to drive them to an equal level of sound as compared to a high sensitivity rated speaker.

If your AVR has a really low power rating per channel, then choosing a speaker with a high sensitivity rating makes good sense. In such a scenario the introduction of a seperate power amplifier would make sense as its power is usually true to stated specs (unlike AVR's).

John
John, you hit that joint on the head, you a wild hammer!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2010, 02:55 PM   #87
dancel dancel is offline
Active Member
 
dancel's Avatar
 
Oct 2009
Toronto
27
548
5
1
1
Send a message via Skype™ to dancel
Default

I just recently bought a super tweeter (Pioneer PT-R4) i was wondering if my speaker is 95db and the tweeter is 90db are they a good match?

Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2010, 10:55 PM   #88
Big Daddy Big Daddy is offline
Blu-ray Champion
 
Big Daddy's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Southern California
79
122
1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dancel View Post
I just recently bought a super tweeter (Pioneer PT-R4) i was wondering if my speaker is 95db and the tweeter is 90db are they a good match?

Thanks
I also use two different sets of super tweeters. For pictures and more information, go to https://forum.blu-ray.com/speakers/1...upgrading.html and check posts #2 and #116.

Because the super tweeters and the other drivers have different sensitivities, it is possible that one may sound louder than the other one. You may want to use an L-Pad.

http://www.amazon.com/s?url=search-a...keywords=L-pad

http://www.parts-express.com/wizards...chFilter=L-pad

http://www.madisound.com/catalog/adv...1&inc_subcat=1

http://www.solen.ca/pub/cms_nf_catal...lvbj01JmZ0PW5m


Follow these wiring diagrams:


  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2010, 12:52 AM   #89
dancel dancel is offline
Active Member
 
dancel's Avatar
 
Oct 2009
Toronto
27
548
5
1
1
Send a message via Skype™ to dancel
Default

The super tweeter has a built in High Pass filter that goes from 20khz to 30khz, also the rest of my speakers are 8ohm and the tweeter is 6ohm, my receiver can switch from 6ohm to 8ohm, which one should i use Big Daddy?
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2010, 01:55 AM   #90
Big Daddy Big Daddy is offline
Blu-ray Champion
 
Big Daddy's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Southern California
79
122
1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dancel View Post
The super tweeter has a built in High Pass filter that goes from 20khz to 30khz, also the rest of my speakers are 8ohm and the tweeter is 6ohm, my receiver can switch from 6ohm to 8ohm, which one should i use Big Daddy?
It is good that your super tweeters have crossovers. In the absence of crossovers, you would have to use capacitors to block the low frequency sound from the super tweeters. Remember that an L-Pad deals with volume and not crossover.

When you connect two speakers (main speaker & super tweeter) in parallel, you will drop the combined impedance. Most receivers cannot handle very low impedance speakers such as 4 ohm or 2 ohm. Some receivers can handle 6 ohm speakers and some have a switch to set the receiver to 6 ohm or 8 ohm. The problem is that when you set the receiver to 6 ohm, it may significantly affect its performance. Try the 8 ohm and check the receiver periodically. If the receiver gets abnormally hot, set it to 6 ohm.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2010, 02:31 AM   #91
dancel dancel is offline
Active Member
 
dancel's Avatar
 
Oct 2009
Toronto
27
548
5
1
1
Send a message via Skype™ to dancel
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
It is good that your super tweeters have crossovers. In the absence of crossovers, you would have to use capacitors to block the low frequency sound from the super tweeters. Remember that an L-Pad deals with volume and not crossover.

When you connect two speakers (main speaker & super tweeter) in parallel, you will drop the combined impedance. Most receivers cannot handle very low impedance speakers such as 4 ohm or 2 ohm. Some receivers can handle 6 ohm speakers and some have a switch to set the receiver to 6 ohm or 8 ohm. The problem is that when you set the receiver to 6 ohm, it may significantly affect its performance. Try the 8 ohm and check the receiver periodically. If the receiver gets abnormally hot, set it to 6 ohm.

Thanks Big Daddy for the responses really appreciate it!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2010, 06:28 AM   #92
datukung2@ datukung2@ is offline
New Member
 
Jul 2010
Default New home theater with older speakers

Wow! This forum is awesome. Thanks for all your efforts. I am not much into technical stuff and I would appreciate very much if someone could help me out with this. I am planning of buying Sony BDV-E370 and the rating for the speakers is 3 ohms. I have a set of existing speakers (I believe they are SS-V813ED) together with sub woofer that came with my older receiver Sony STR-DB940 (fried by lightning) which I would like to use. Will this combination do any harm to both the speaker and the blu-ray amp? The other thing is, my rear speakers cable are about 45 feet long, will this harm the amp? Thanks in advance.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2010, 05:10 PM   #93
Big Daddy Big Daddy is offline
Blu-ray Champion
 
Big Daddy's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Southern California
79
122
1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by datukung2@ View Post
Wow! This forum is awesome. Thanks for all your efforts. I am not much into technical stuff and I would appreciate very much if someone could help me out with this. I am planning of buying Sony BDV-E370 and the rating for the speakers is 3 ohms. I have a set of existing speakers (I believe they are SS-V813ED) together with sub woofer that came with my older receiver Sony STR-DB940 (fried by lightning) which I would like to use. Will this combination do any harm to both the speaker and the blu-ray amp? The other thing is, my rear speakers cable are about 45 feet long, will this harm the amp? Thanks in advance.
  1. Do you plan to use the old and the new speakers at the same time and running them together? I am not sure most HTIB systems allow that.
  2. What are the impedance ratings of the old speakers?
  3. If you connect the speakers in parallel as in the following diagram, the impedance will drop to dangerously low levels and the amplifier may not be able to handle it. It may overheat and fail.




    This connection would give a final impedance of 2 ohms.

  4. If you connect the speakers in series as in the following diagram, the net impedance will rise. Most receivers and external amplifiers can handle the rise in impedance up to a certain point. I am not sure about the amplifiers that are inside the system you are planning to buy. I would encourage you to call Sony and ask them. My recommendation is not to connect two set of speakers to the same speaker outputs of the Sony BDV-E370.




    This connection would give a final impedance of 8 ohms.

  5. The general rule is that the longer the length of the speaker wires and the lower the impedance rating of the speakers, the thicker the speaker wires you should use. Buy 12 gauge wires. If you use very thin wires, the sound quality may be affected. It will not hurt the amplifier.

Last edited by Big Daddy; 07-22-2010 at 05:15 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2010, 04:53 AM   #94
datukung2@ datukung2@ is offline
New Member
 
Jul 2010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
  1. Do you plan to use the old and the new speakers at the same time and running them together? I am not sure most HTIB systems allow that.
  2. What are the impedance ratings of the old speakers?
  3. If you connect the speakers in parallel as in the following diagram, the impedance will drop to dangerously low levels and the amplifier may not be able to handle it. It may overheat and fail.




    This connection would give a final impedance of 2 ohms.

  4. If you connect the speakers in series as in the following diagram, the net impedance will rise. Most receivers and external amplifiers can handle the rise in impedance up to a certain point. I am not sure about the amplifiers that are inside the system you are planning to buy. I would encourage you to call Sony and ask them. My recommendation is not to connect two set of speakers to the same speaker outputs of the Sony BDV-E370.




    This connection would give a final impedance of 8 ohms.

  5. The general rule is that the longer the length of the speaker wires and the lower the impedance rating of the speakers, the thicker the speaker wires you should use. Buy 12 gauge wires. If you use very thin wires, the sound quality may be affected. It will not hurt the amplifier.
Thanks Big Daddy for your prompt reply, appreciate it very much.
Answering your questions:
1. I just want to use my old sets of speakers.
2. I am not very sure of the impedance rating of my old speakers (I have to check it out) but I think they are 6 ohms. I remember I set the speakers selection to 6 ohms on the amp as recommended in the manual.
3. I don't really understand or the benefit of wiring then in series or parallel apart from what you explained above. I will just wire them up as instructed in the manual.
4. Can I assume it to be alright, if my old speakers are not lower then 3 ohms, since the new speakers rating is 3 ohms.
5. The wires of my speakers are of 12 gauge and I am planning to use the S-AIR Wireless apaptor for the rear speakers. What do you think?
Thanks again. Hope to hear from you soon.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2010, 10:29 AM   #95
Big Daddy Big Daddy is offline
Blu-ray Champion
 
Big Daddy's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Southern California
79
122
1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by datukung2@ View Post
Thanks Big Daddy for your prompt reply, appreciate it very much.
Answering your questions:
1. I just want to use my old sets of speakers.
2. I am not very sure of the impedance rating of my old speakers (I have to check it out) but I think they are 6 ohms. I remember I set the speakers selection to 6 ohms on the amp as recommended in the manual.
3. I don't really understand or the benefit of wiring then in series or parallel apart from what you explained above. I will just wire them up as instructed in the manual.
4. Can I assume it to be alright, if my old speakers are not lower then 3 ohms, since the new speakers rating is 3 ohms.
5. The wires of my speakers are of 12 gauge and I am planning to use the S-AIR Wireless apaptor for the rear speakers. What do you think?
Thanks again. Hope to hear from you soon.
In general, receivers and amplifiers have a much easier time handling higher impedances than lower. My guess is that your amp should be able to handle the 6 ohm speakers. However, check the manual carefully and make sure there are no warnings against higher impedance speakers.

The wiring instructions I mentioned above are for people who want to connect two sets of speakers to the amplifier for different rooms. In your case, it is better to avoid it. If you had a more powerful external amplifier, I would say you could do it.

Thicker speaker wires are always better for longer distances. Wireless can work as long as you do not live next to a power station or a radio station. In such cases, interference can be a problem.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 12:17 AM   #96
datukung2@ datukung2@ is offline
New Member
 
Jul 2010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
In general, receivers and amplifiers have a much easier time handling higher impedances than lower. My guess is that your amp should be able to handle the 6 ohm speakers. However, check the manual carefully and make sure there are no warnings against higher impedance speakers.

The wiring instructions I mentioned above are for people who want to connect two sets of speakers to the amplifier for different rooms. In your case, it is better to avoid it. If you had a more powerful external amplifier, I would say you could do it.

Thicker speaker wires are always better for longer distances. Wireless can work as long as you do not live next to a power station or a radio station. In such cases, interference can be a problem.
Thank you Big Daddy. It is always good to know that, there are people like you out there who are willing to share their knowledge and helping others. Keep it up and God Bless.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 08:14 AM   #97
garyrc garyrc is offline
Senior Member
 
Apr 2009
1
Default

In an earlier post (more than a year ago!) someone said that speakers were rated for sensitivity at 1K. According to a Klipsch engineer I talked to, AES recommends measuring speaker sensitivity with pink noise with 6 dB peaks, over the rated bandwidth of the speaker, rather than at the single frequency of 1K. It seems to me that a given speaker could have a peak or dip at 1K, so SPL at 1K may not be at all representative of the speakers overall performance . In the past, some manufacturers rated sensitivity over a range of something like 200 to 4k Hz, but many manufacturers (including Klipsch, I gather) do use the entire advertised bandwidth of the speaker with a pink noise source. Manufacturers may modify the sensitivity figures to make them reflect the actual sensitivity the speaker would have in the manufacturers recommended room placement (distance from walls, etc.), or publish two figures, one anechoic, and one with "room gain" (like Paradigm).
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 01:29 AM   #98
datukung2@ datukung2@ is offline
New Member
 
Jul 2010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Daddy View Post
In general, receivers and amplifiers have a much easier time handling higher impedances than lower. My guess is that your amp should be able to handle the 6 ohm speakers. However, check the manual carefully and make sure there are no warnings against higher impedance speakers.

The wiring instructions I mentioned above are for people who want to connect two sets of speakers to the amplifier for different rooms. In your case, it is better to avoid it. If you had a more powerful external amplifier, I would say you could do it.

Thicker speaker wires are always better for longer distances. Wireless can work as long as you do not live next to a power station or a radio station. In such cases, interference can be a problem.
Hi Bid Daddy,
with reference to the post dated 07/23/2010, these are the specs I managed to get. (My intention was to use my old speakers and sub-woofer with new HTIB Sony BDV-E370.)

Amp section:

Power output (rated) : Front L/R : 108W + 108W (at 3 ohms, 1kHz, 1% THD)

Power output (reference) Front L/R/Center/Surround L/R:
142 W (per channel at 3 ohms, 1 kHz)

Sub-woofer : 140 W (at 3 ohms, 80 Hz)

Speaker section:

Front/Surround : rated impedance 3 ohms.
Center : rated impedance 3 ohms
Sub-woofer : rated impedance 3 ohms.

The followings are of my old speakers.
Front/center/rear speakers : rated impedance 8 0hms
Max input power 140W

Sub-woofer :
Continuous RMS power output 150W (8ohms, 20-150 HZ, 0.8% THD)

Please, let me know if they are compatible, if not what can I do?
The other thing is, which is the negative for the RCA plug?
Thanks in advance.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 12:48 AM   #99
p902 p902 is offline
Junior Member
 
Aug 2010
Default Another question!

Hi guys, I was directed to this thread via google and it has been a really enlightening read.

I have a dilemma: I am in the position to get a very good deal on two polk audio lc-265i speakers (rated at 4ohm). I currently have one KEF Ci200.3QS (rated at 6ohm) and a couple of 8ohm speakers (in ceiling as surrounds)

I plan to use the polks for my front L & R and the KEf for my centre. I also plan to get an onky tx-sr608 receiver (no separate amp though)

My choice of front speakers (polk lc-265i) and receiver (onkyo 608) are driven mainly by the fact that I am able to get a very good deal on them.

Basically I would be using my onkyo to drive 4,6 and 8 ohm speakers simultaneously (and occassionally loudly)

Is this mix a good idea or should I stick to speakers with similar impedance?

Thanks.

Last edited by p902; 08-23-2010 at 12:50 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 01:01 AM   #100
Big Daddy Big Daddy is offline
Blu-ray Champion
 
Big Daddy's Avatar
 
Jan 2008
Southern California
79
122
1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by p902 View Post
Hi guys, I was directed to this thread via google and it has been a really enlightening read.

I have a dilemma: I am in the position to get a very good deal on two polk audio lc-265i speakers (rated at 4ohm). I currently have one KEF Ci200.3QS (rated at 6ohm) and a couple of 8ohm speakers (in ceiling as surrounds)

I plan to use the polks for my front L & R and the KEf for my centre. I also plan to get an onky tx-sr608 receiver (no separate amp though)

My choice of front speakers (polk lc-265i) and receiver (onkyo 608) are driven mainly by the fact that I am able to get a very good deal on them.

Basically I would be using my onkyo to drive 4,6 and 8 ohm speakers simultaneously (and occassionally loudly)

Is this mix a good idea or should I stick to speakers with similar impedance?

Thanks.
I would encourage you to get a cheap receiver that has pre-outs for all its channels and buy a used stereo or multi-channel amplifier to power at least the two 4-ohm speakers. Most lower-end receivers do not have a large enough power supply to handle lower impedance speakers, particularly at loud volumes. They become execessively hot and may fail. Onkyo receivers are known to run hot even with 8-ohm speakers.

If you decide to buy the low-impedance speakers and power them with a receiver, don't turn the volume too high and make sure the receiver is properly ventillated. Check it periodically to make sure it is not overheating.
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Audio > Speakers

Similar Threads
thread Forum Thread Starter Replies Last Post
Speaker sensitivity Speakers browndk26 12 09-28-2009 03:50 AM
Will Bi-Wiring lower the impedance of my speaker? Speakers I Bleed Blu 3 01-29-2009 01:17 AM
Speaker Impedance with Reciever Receivers Snpbond 5 11-24-2008 12:48 PM
Speaker Impedance... Speakers KayaM 7 08-05-2008 03:20 AM


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:33 AM.