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Old 04-01-2019, 07:26 AM   #21
Thomas Irwin Thomas Irwin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octagon View Post
Is it true that toasters don't last thirty years anymore. Yeah, probably. Is that a reflection of the pace of society? Probably not.
Yeah, but in the good ol' days, you could probably open a new bank account and get one for free, if you were too cheap or lazy to enter a department store. Nowadays, you're lucky if they have more than a couple of live tellers on duty and you're likely to pick one up at a Wally World (Walmart) in an eyesore strip mall.
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Old 04-04-2019, 07:25 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Akibiyori View Post
It’s not like everyone in the world had massive collections of books and music and movies back in the 1990s. Most people, the vast majority, just rented movies and only had a small selection of favorites on VHS, a small collection of music, and at best a few mass market paperbacks of super duper ultra popular writers like Stephen King.
That's not accurate about either book or music collections. It was accurate about VHS movies to a certain extent because initially they cost as much as $90 to own but once prices came down, they actually began to sell quite well, especially kids titles because those had high repeat playability.

Between 1990 and 1999, 9.2 billion(!) albums were sold in North America alone on LP, CD, cassette and 8-track. Most people actually had massive collections by the time that decade was over. A lot of it was people replacing their LP or tape collections with CD's, but it was still massive, especially impressive considering that one could argue that the music of the 90's was inferior to prior decades.

And in the '90's, the number of bookstores in the U.S. was still growing, the first "superstores" opened - massive bookstores that also sold music and video, you could still buy paperbacks at drug stores and newsstands and you still saw people on public transportation systems and airplanes reading newspapers, magazines and printed books. It's not like today when practically everyone on the subway is looking at their phone and when you get close to them, you find that 10% are watching a movie or TV show, 30% are on social media or texting and most of the rest are playing a free game. It's quite rare to see someone with a printed book or newspaper - I'm usually the only one with print copy of the Times.
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Old 04-04-2019, 04:12 PM   #23
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Recent article about Microsoft's ebook store closure really says it all about digital "ownership";

Microsoft's eBook store: When this closes, your books disappear too - BBC News

Quote:
There’s bad news for users of Microsoft’s eBook store: the company is closing it down, and, with it, any books bought through the service will no longer be readable.

To soften the blow, the company has promised to refund any customers who bought books through the store (a clue that there may not have been that many of them, hence the closure. Microsoft did not offer further comment).

But just think about that for a moment. Isn’t it strange? If you’re a Microsoft customer, you paid for those books. They’re yours.

Except, I’m afraid, they’re not, and they never were - when you hand over money for your “book”, what you’re really paying for is access to the book. That access, per the terms and conditions of every major eBook store, can be taken away at any moment.

...
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Old 04-04-2019, 04:32 PM   #24
Matthew.H Matthew.H is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveSimonH View Post
Recent article about Microsoft's ebook store closure really says it all about digital "ownership";

Microsoft's eBook store: When this closes, your books disappear too - BBC News
Nearly all digital "purchases" should be treated as a rental as ultimately that's what they are.
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Old 04-04-2019, 04:53 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by DaveSimonH View Post
Recent article about Microsoft's ebook store closure really says it all about digital "ownership";

Microsoft's eBook store: When this closes, your books disappear too - BBC News
Yet they want to force us to go all digital. The hell with that.
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Old 04-24-2019, 09:22 PM   #26
PS-RagE PS-RagE is offline
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Frankly, I'm done with physical copies of anything. Hell, I've purchased Star Wars five times now (VHS, VHS again, DVD, Blu-ray and now iTunes). I have boxes and boxes of CDs and DVDs in storage and a office full of paperbacks. I was upgrading my movies to HD but I've stopped buying Blu-rays now in favor of iTunes. My music comes from Bandcamp and my books are all Kindle.
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Old 06-30-2019, 12:27 AM   #27
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Honestly I think it's more about their not really being much of a value in having a collection of physical movies anymore. Let's be honest how many times do we buy a film and maybe watch it one time and then it sits on the shelf to collect dust? I stopped buying dvds and blu rays a long time ago for this very reason.

If there are movies that I know I will watch many times in a year then I will hit up the local second hand stores and pawn shops. Other then that my digital vudu collection does me just fine.

I think for many people this is the case. It's just more cost effective to store movies in a digital locker like vudu than buying physical discs.. Many digital codes can be bought online for as low as $1. It's no wonder why digital is getting more popular. Not to mention being able to download and store on a sd card on your phone to be able to watch your movies anywhere.

I will always support physical media in some capacity(renting,etc). I don't ever wanna live in a world where there is no physical media.
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Old 01-13-2020, 12:13 AM   #28
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I enjoy digital media. It's nice being able to carry my entire music collection as lossless files on a small, portable hard drive. The lossless files are the same exact sound quality as on the CDs. For movies, I think the quality of discs is better for the equivalent quality - DVD/SD, BD/HD, 4K/UHD. This will obviously improve as peoples' network connections get faster. I guess the thing I don't like about "digital" is DRM. The idea that you don't really own/control it. It's yours but it's not really yours. One thing I think should change is the laws around DRM. I think that they only exist so that the movie/film industry can make you buy something again that you already paid for rather than allowing you to fairly use it.
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Old 02-05-2020, 10:30 AM   #29
bhampton bhampton is online now
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I got interested in Digital because as I collected Blu Rays I always redeemed all my digital copies and shared my UV library with friends. (Much better then lending them discs they would forget to return.)

Now Family Sharing with iTunes means my kids have my collection automagically and can take it anywhere.

So, Digital and Physical both have a place in my strategy but my key to streaming stuff is I don't pay for any of it.

I buy only physical now and the codes I consider free and because I no longer pay for them (at all) I don't care when they disappear on occasion or change from one format to another. I simply don't care because it's free.

I have some neighbors that share HBO Go, Hulu, Netflix and we have Prime mostly because we buy often with Amazon.

I don't mind digital but I would rather watch physical when I'm home. The quality is always better. (with exception of stuff that only gets 4K in Digital.)

I like collecting movies and you can't do that with digital.

-Brian

p.s. Speaking of culture, my kids mostly watch tic Tok videos now. They are used to 10 second movies and they see that as normal...

Last edited by bhampton; 02-05-2020 at 01:35 PM.
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Old 02-12-2020, 11:26 AM   #30
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Digital - to me - just feels like legalized piracy. It's like paying for a copy that you can usually find for free with little effort and seeing as I never gave any value to owning copies, it feels like a waste of money.

I still buy physical and always will. If it disappears then I'll buy nothing. I'll live.
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Old 02-12-2020, 11:36 AM   #31
bhampton bhampton is online now
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I agree buying streaming makes zero sense.

You don't own it so don't buy it.

Took me a while to realize this though.

If you ever have a problem with iTunes content (like I did many times including when my 4 Danial Craig James Bond movies downgraded from 4K to HD for about 5 weeks) they will tell you the content owners can do whatever. And by content owners they are NOT referring to you.
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Old 02-14-2020, 03:23 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Yellow View Post
I still buy physical and always will. If it disappears then I'll buy nothing. I'll live.
My stance in a nutshell.
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Old 02-14-2020, 04:15 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by bhampton View Post
I agree buying streaming makes zero sense.

You don't own it so don't buy it.

Took me a while to realize this though.

If you ever have a problem with iTunes content (like I did many times including when my 4 Danial Craig James Bond movies downgraded from 4K to HD for about 5 weeks) they will tell you the content owners can do whatever. And by content owners they are NOT referring to you.
It was approx 2 weeks that movies were downgraded from 4K to 1080p. The temp downgrade was while they were adding Dolby Vision. So you got an upgrade after 2 weeks.
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Old 02-14-2020, 09:59 AM   #34
bhampton bhampton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Admiral View Post
It was approx 2 weeks that movies were downgraded from 4K to 1080p. The temp downgrade was while they were adding Dolby Vision. So you got an upgrade after 2 weeks.
If my movies need a week to be changed from one version to another then that's un-acceptable. Should be one working day if anyone is paying attention. Maybe less with today's technologies.

There's other things flakey about iTunes too like some of my movies are still offered on the store but my version isn't the latest version so unless I go to find it in my library Siri will suggest I buy it again if I do a voice search for it. Also Siri often suggests I sign up for a steaming service like HBO GO to watch a movie it doesn't realise I already own in 4K in iTunes.

Other movies just aren't on the store at all like Amelie but I can thankfully still find a version in my library.

I'm glad for anyone who is still loving iTunes and I suppose that includes me as I still have 1026 movies and 6 complete TV series in iTunes and I still share my whole collection and Apple Music with my kids.

I am still very active with sharing my iTunes and I still redeem all my codes. I just won't buy iTunes with money because you don't OWN iTunes content at all.

-Brian

Last edited by bhampton; 02-14-2020 at 10:06 AM.
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Old 02-14-2020, 04:42 PM   #35
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Aside from the disappearing content on the whims of the studios. These are the things that are keeping me buying physical even though it has been less.

1. Physical disks still have better audio/video experience
2. I use Vudu and Movies Anywhere. The fact some stuff shows up in one and not the other and some studios are just missing shows the headache it can be to find where to find what you want to watch. This will get worse as everything will migrate as exclusives under studio's own streaming service. Physical I can find it all on my shelf.
3. Data caps. I will be getting a 4k TV this year and I cringe at how much data it will be stream 4k movies on a regular basis.
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Old 02-15-2020, 04:16 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhampton View Post
If my movies need a week to be changed from one version to another then that's un-acceptable. Should be one working day if anyone is paying attention. Maybe less with today's technologies.
I agree it's not ideal and hopefully this process will improve. My point is, the temporary downgrade in quality from 4K to 1080p for a couple of weeks is a relatively minor inconvenience (in my opinion), if the end result is a free Dolby Vision upgrade.
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Old 02-27-2020, 10:09 PM   #37
JEArgumedo JEArgumedo is online now
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I used to be very much in the physical camp, and then I moved out of my parents house and went to college. Lack of space was and still is a real issue even in my current apartment. Basically, I don't bother buying physical anymore unless I absolutely need to have it in the best quality (which is quickly becoming a non-factor too).

Last year I started ripping my DVD/Blu/4K collection to a media server and stream everything losslessly to my AppleTV 4K so now I'm even considering ridding myself of a player and just ripping the discs and put the discs in storage somewhere where they won't take up any room. Even the question of longevity is becoming moot. I have lost more titles on disc due to fire, water damage, or just a small scratch than titles being recalled by the studio from my digital collection.

I still have a soft spot for physical media, but I can see myself in a few years just not bothering anymore. My digital purchases already outpace my physical ones and the physical ones come with digital copies more often than not so it's already a losing battle for physical.

As for others:
Music - Went digital before I left for college. If I have to get my hands on an album, it gets ripped immediately

Games - Started going digital and then stopped buying them and playing them. So... I might be done with that for the time being. I have so much in my backlog anyways that it isn't worthwhile to play anything new.
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Old 03-13-2020, 08:19 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by harpolini View Post
Everyone says rights can be pulled whenever but a house fire or disaster could also destroy your entire collection and you're left with nothing.
I don't buy the "what if your collection ignites in a fiery ball of flame?" fear. With physical distribution there are other copies out in the world - the content itself is not lost forever.

In a strictly digital world, once a title is pulled from circulation - it's gone, no one will (legally) have it.
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Old 03-24-2020, 04:27 PM   #39
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I like physical media but I'm not opposed to streaming. Haven't bought a digital movie so far but I use Prime video, mostly for series I wouldn't buy anyway. I might consider buying a digital movie that isn't available in HD anywhere else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZoetMB View Post
Between 1990 and 1999, 9.2 billion(!) albums were sold in North America alone on LP, CD, cassette and 8-track. Most people actually had massive collections by the time that decade was over. A lot of it was people replacing their LP or tape collections with CD's, but it was still massive, especially impressive considering that one could argue that the music of the 90's was inferior to prior decades.
Kinda late to the party here but the population of North America was around 300 million in 1995, meaning: on average, everyone bought about 31 albums over a decade. Or about 3 albums a year. Doesn't sound nearly enough for most people having massive collections. Some most definitely did but that's always been a minority. Just like most people don't own massive collections of physical movies.
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Old 04-02-2020, 02:16 AM   #40
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I never buy streaming copies except if it comes in a Blu-ray I bought or if I do VUDU Disc+Digital. I don't think the cost is worth it for the quality you're getting. If the streams were downloadable and at Blu-ray/4K bitrates with lossless audio, that would be a different story.
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