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Old 07-24-2012, 03:44 AM   #1
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Criterion The Eclipse Series

The Eclipse Series Collection


I thought it would be great to have one thread for all Eclipse box sets Criterion release each month. These are typically important, hard to find films for which suitable HD elements may not exist to bring them to Blu-ray, or simply lesser known films, hence they appear on DVD. The Eclipse Series features films by some of Cinema's greatest directors, such as Ingmar Bergman, Yasjiro Ozu, Roberto Rossellini, and Carlos Saura, among others. The thread will be updated each time Criterion announce a new release.

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Old 07-24-2012, 03:44 AM   #2
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Eclipse Series 1: Early Bergman
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Before The Seventh Seal and Wild Strawberries established him as one of the great masters of cinema, Ingmar Bergman created a series of devastating but less well-known psychological character studies, marked by intricate, layered narratives, gritty environments, and haunting visuals. These early films, which show the stirrings of the genius to come, remain the hidden treasures of a European cinema on the cusp of a golden age.
Eclipse Series 2: The Documentaries of Louis Malle
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Over the course of a nearly forty-year career, Louis Malle forged a reputation as one of the world's most versatile cinematic storytellers, with such widely acclaimed, and wide-ranging, masterpieces as Elevator to the Gallows, My Dinner with Andre, and Au revoir les enfants. At the same time, however, with less fanfare, Malle was creating a parallel, even more personal body of work as a documentary filmmaker. With the discerning eye of a true artist and the investigatory skills of a great journalist, Malle takes us from a street corner in Paris to America's heartland to the expanses of India, in his astonishing epic Phantom India. These are some of the most engaging and fascinating nonfiction films ever made.
Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu
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Master filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu directed fifty-three feature films over the course of his long career. Yet it was in the final decade of his life, his “old master” phase, that he entered his artistic prime. Centered more than ever on the modern sensibilities of the younger generation, these delicate family dramas are marked by an exquisite formal elegance and emotional sensitivity about birth and death, love and marriage, and all the accompanying joys and loneliness. Along with such better-known films as Floating Weeds and An Autumn Afternoon, these five works illustrate the worldly wisdom of one of cinema’s great artists at the height of his powers.
Eclipse Series 4: Raymond Bernard
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One of the greatest and least-known directors of all time, Raymond Bernard helped shape French cinema, at the dawn of the sound era, into a truly formidable industry. Typical of films from this period, Bernard’s dazzling dramas painted intimate melodrama on epic-scale canvases. These two masterpieces—the wrenching World War I tragedy Wooden Crosses and a mammoth, nearly five-hour Les misérables, widely considered the greatest film adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel—exemplify the formal and narrative brilliance of an unjustly overshadowed cinematic trailblazer.
Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller
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His films have been called raw, outrageous, sensational, and daring. In four decades of directing, Samuel Fuller created a legendarily idiosyncratic oeuvre, examining U.S. history and mythmaking in westerns, film noirs, and war epics. And characteristically, it all began with a bang: after printing the legend with the elegant B-pictures I Shot Jesse James and The Baron of Arizona, he got himself into hot water with the FBI on The Steel Helmet, the first American movie to portray the Korean War. These three independent films showed off Fuller’s genre diversity, gutter wit, and subversive force, and pointed the way to a controversial career in studio moviemaking.
Eclipse Series 6: Carlos Saura’s Flamenco Trilogy
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One of Spanish cinema’s great auteurs, Carlos Saura brought international audiences closer to the art of his country’s dance than any other filmmaker, before or since. In his Flamenco Trilogy—Blood Wedding, Carmen, and El amor brujo—Saura merged his passion for music with his exploration of national identity. All starring and choreographed by legendary dancer Antonio Gades, the films feature thrilling physicality and electrifying cinematography and editing—colorful paeans to bodies in motion as well as to cinema itself.
Eclipse Series 7: Postwar Kurosawa
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The most popular Japanese moviemaker of all time, Akira Kurosawa began his career by delving into the state of his nation immediately following World War II, with visual poetry and direct emotion. Amid Japan s economic collapse, moral waywardness, and American occupation, Kurosawa managed to find humor and redemption existing alongside despair and anxiety. In these five films, which range from the whimsically Capraesque to the icily Dostoyevskian, from political epics to courtroom potboilers, Kurosawa established both the artistic range and social acuity that would inform his entire career.
Eclipse Series 8: Lubitsch Musicals
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Renowned as a silent film pioneer and the man who refined Hollywood comedy with such masterpieces as Trouble in Paradise, The Shop Around the Corner, and To Be or Not to Be, Ernst Lubitsch also had another claim to fame: he helped invent the modern movie musical. With the advent of sound and audiences clamoring for “talkies,” Lubitsch combined his love of European operettas and his mastery of film to create this entirely new genre. These elegant, bawdy films, made before strict enforcement of the Hays morality code, feature some of the greatest stars of early Hollywood (Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald, Claudette Colbert, Miriam Hopkins), as well as that elusive style of comedy that would thereafter be known as “the Lubitsch touch.”
Eclipse Series 9: The Delirious Fictions of William Klein
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William Klein’s explosive New York street photography made him one of the most heralded artists of the sixties. An American expatriate in Paris, Klein has also been making challenging cinema for more than forty years, yet with the exception of his acclaimed documentary Muhammad Ali, the Greatest, his film work is barely known in the United States. In his three fiction features—Who Are You, Polly Maggoo?, Mr. Freedom, and The Model Couple—he skewers the fashion industry, American empire, and governmental mind control with hilarious, cutting aplomb. Today Klein’s politically galvanizing social critiques seem even more acute than the works of the better-known New Wavers. These are colorful, surreal antidotes to all forms of social oppression.
Eclipse Series 10: Silent Ozu - Three Family Comedies
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In the late twenties and early thirties, Yasujiro Ozu was working steadily for Shochiku studios, honing his craft on dozens of silent films in various genres, from romantic melodramas to college comedies to gangster pictures—and, of course, movies about families. In these three droll domestic films—Tokyo Chorus, I Was Born, But . . . , and Passing Fancy, presented here with all-new scores by renowned silent-film composer Donald Sosin—Ozu movingly and humorously depicts middle-class struggles and the resentments between children and parents, establishing the emotional and aesthetic delicacy with which he would transform the landscape of cinema.
Eclipse Series 11: Larisa Shepitko
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The career of Larisa Shepitko, an icon of sixties and seventies Soviet cinema, was tragically cut short when she was killed in a car crash at age forty, just as she was emerging on the international scene. The body of work she left behind, though small, is masterful, and her genius for visually evoking characters’ interior worlds is never more striking than in her two greatest works: Wings, an intimate yet exhilarating portrait of a female fighter pilot turned provincial headmistress, and The Ascent, a gripping, tragic wartime parable of betrayal and martyrdom. A true artist who had deftly used the Soviet film industry to make statements both personal and universal, Shepitko remains one of the greatest unsung filmmakers of all time.
Eclipse Series 12: Aki Kaurismaki's Proletariat Trilogy
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The poignant, deadpan films of Aki Kaurismäki are pitched somewhere in the wintry nether lands between comedy and tragedy. And rarely in his body of work has the line separating those genres seemed thinner than in what is often identified as his “Proletariat Trilogy,” Shadows in Paradise, Ariel, and The Match Factory Girl. In these three films, something like social-realist farces, Kaurismäki surveys the working-class outcasts of his native Finland with detached yet disarming amusement. Featuring commanding, off-key visual compositions and delightfully dour performances, the films in this triptych exemplify the talents of a unique and highly influential film artist.
Eclipse Series 13: Kenji Mizoguchi's Fallen Women
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Over the course of a three-decade, more than eighty film career, master cineaste Kenji Mizoguchi (Ugetsu, Sansho the Bailiff) would return again and again to one abiding theme: the plight of women in Japanese society. In these four lacerating works of social consciousness—two prewar (Osaka Elegy, Sisters of the Gion), two postwar (Women of the Night, Street of Shame)—Mizoguchi introduces an array of compelling female protagonists, crushed or resilient, who are forced by their conditions and culture into compromising positions. With Mizoguchi’s visual daring and eloquence, these films are as cinematically thrilling as they are politically rousing.
Eclipse Series 14: Rossellini's History Films: Renaissance And Enlightenment
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In the final phase of his career, Italian master Roberto Rossellini embarked on a dramatic, daunting project: a series of television films about knowledge and history, made in an effort to teach, where contemporary media were failing. Looking at the Western world’s major figures and moments, yet focusing on the small details of daily life, Rossellini was determined not to recount history but to relive it, as it might have been, unadorned but full of the drama of the everyday. This selection of Rossellini’s history films presents The Age of the Medici, Cartesius, and Blaise Pascal—works that don’t just enliven the past but illuminate the ideas that brought us to where we are today.
Eclipse Series 15: Travels with Hiroshi Shimizu
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Of all the directors who made names for themselves during the Japanese studio golden age of the 1930s, Hiroshi Shimizu was one of the most respected—and, today, one of the least well-known. A curious, compassionate storyteller who was fascinated by characters on the outskirts of society, Shimizu used his trademark graceful traveling shot to peek around the corners of contemporary Japan. In these four lyrical, beautifully filmed tales, concerning geisha, bus drivers, and masseurs, Shimizu journeys far and wide to find the makings of a modern nation.
Eclipse Series 16: Alexander Korda's Private Lives
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Though born to modest means in Hungary, Alexander Korda would go on to become one of the most important filmmakers in the history of British cinema. A producer, writer, and director who navigated toward subjects of major historical significance and mythical distinction, Korda made a name for his production company, London Films, with the Oscar-winning The Private Life of Henry VIII. He then continued his populist investigation behind the scenes and in the bedrooms of such figures as Catherine the Great, Don Juan, and Rembrandt. Mixing stately period drama with surprising satire, these films are exemplars of grand 1930s moviemaking.
Eclipse Series 17: Nikkatsu Noir
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From the late 1950s through the sixties, wild, idiosyncratic crime movies were the brutal and boisterous business of Nikkatsu, the oldest film studio in Japan. In an effort to attract youthful audiences growing increasingly accustomed to American and French big-screen imports, Nikkatsu began producing action potboilers (mukokuseki akushun, or “borderless action”) that incorporated elements of the western, comedy, gangster, and teen-rebel genres. This bruised and bloody collection represents a standout cross section of what Nikkatsu had to offer, from such prominent, stylistically daring directors as Seijun Suzuki, Toshio Masuda, and Takashi Nomura.
Eclipse Series 18: Dusan Makavejev- Free Radical
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There’s never been another filmmaker quite like Dušan Makavejev. Even in the 1960s, when all of cinema’s rules seemed to be breaking down and artists such as Godard, Cassavetes, and Marker were dissolving the boundary between fiction and documentary, Yugoslavia’s Makavejev stood alone. His films about political and sexual liberation were revolutionary, raucous, and ribald. Across these, his wild, collagelike first three films, Makavejev investigates—with a tonic mix of earnestness and whimsy—love, death, and work; the legacy of war and the absurdity of daily life in a Communist state; criminology and hypnosis; strudels and strongmen.
Eclipse Series 19: Chantal Akerman in the Seventies
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Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world.
Eclipse Series 20: George Bernard Shaw on Film
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The hugely influential, Nobel Prize–winning critic and playwright George Bernard Shaw was notoriously reluctant to allow his writing to be adapted for the cinema. Yet thanks to the persistence of Hungarian producer Gabriel Pascal, Shaw finally agreed to collaborate on a series of screen versions of his witty, socially minded plays, starting with the Oscar-winning Pygmalion. The three other films that resulted from this famed alliance, Major Barbara, Caesar and Cleopatra, and Androcles and the Lion, long overshadowed by the sensation of Pygmalion, are gathered here for the first time on DVD. These clever, handsomely mounted entertainments star such luminaries of the big screen as Vivien Leigh, Claude Rains, Wendy Hiller, and Rex Harrison.
Eclipse Series 21: Oshima's Outlaw Sixties
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Often called the Godard of the East, Japanese director Nagisa Oshima was one of the most provocative film artists of the twentieth century, and his works challenged and shocked the cinematic world for decades. Following his rise to prominence at Shochiku, Oshima struck out to form his own production company, Sozo-sha, in the early sixties. That move ushered in the prolific period of his career that gave birth to the five films collected here. Unsurprisingly, this studio renegade was fascinated by stories of outsiders—serial killers, rabid hedonists, and stowaway misfits are just some of the social castoffs you’ll meet in these audacious, cerebral entries in the New Wave surge that made Japan a hub of truly daredevil moviemaking.
Eclipse Series 22: Presenting Sacha Guitry
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Sacha Guitry was once a household name. Something of a Gallic Noël Coward, this disarming, multitalented artist served up some of 1930s French cinema’s tastiest dishes. The son of a beloved theater actor, Guitry was devoted to the footlights, first turning to the silver screen only as a way of bringing his plays to a wider audience. His films were anything but stage-bound, however: often the director, writer, and star of his popular movies, Guitry brought a witty inventiveness to the cinema and deployed radical techniques with such aplomb and control that he’s considered one of the medium’s first complete auteurs. With these four films, American audiences can finally sample Guitry’s creative, comic confections.
Eclipse Series 23: The First Films of Akira Kurosawa
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Years before Akira Kurosawa changed the face of cinema with such iconic works as Rashomon, Seven Samurai, and Yojimbo, he made his start in the Japanese film industry with four popular and exceptional works, created while World War II was raging. All gripping dramas, those rare early films—Sanshiro Sugata; The Most Beautiful; Sanshiro Sugata, Part Two; and The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail—are collected here, including a two-part martial arts saga, a portrait of female volunteers helping the war effort, and a kabuki-derived tale of deception. These captivating films are a glorious introduction to a peerless career.
Eclipse Series 24: The Actuality Dramas of Allan King
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Canadian director Allan King is one of cinema’s best-kept secrets. Over the course of fifty years, he shuttled between features and shorts, big-screen cinema and episodic television, comedy and drama, fiction and nonfiction. It was with his cinema-verité-style documentaries, though—his “actuality dramas,” as he called them—that King left his greatest mark on film history. These startlingly intimate studies of people whose lives are in flux—damaged children, warring spouses, the terminally ill— always done without narration or interviews, are riveting and at times emotionally overwhelming. Humane, cathartic, and important, Allan King’s spontaneous portraits of the everyday demand to be seen.
Eclipse Series 25: Basil Dearden's London Underground
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After mastering the mix of comedy, suspense, and horror that helped define the golden age of British cinema, Basil Dearden (along with his producing partner Michael Relph) left the legendary Ealing Studios and struck out on his own. In the late fifties and early sixties, he created a series of gripping, groundbreaking, even controversial films that dealt with racism, homophobia, and the lingering effects of World War II, noir-tinged dramas that burrowed into corners of London rarely seen on-screen. This set of elegantly crafted films brings this quintessential figure of British cinema out of the shadows.
Eclipse Series 26: Silent Naruse
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Mikio Naruse is one of the most popular directors in the history of Japanese cinema, a crafter of heartrending melodramas often compared with the work of Yasujiro Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi. From the outset of his career, with his silent films of the early thirties, Naruse focused on characters, mostly women—geisha, housewives, waitresses—carrying on despite the compromises and disappointments of confined daily lives, a subject that would continue to fascinate him for the next three decades. Though he made two dozen silent films, only five are known to exist today; these works—poignant, brilliantly photographed and edited dramas all—are collected here, on DVD for the first time and featuring new scores by noted musicians Robin Holcomb and Wayne Horvitz.
Eclipse Series 27: Raffaello Matarazzo's Runaway Melodramas
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In the late 1940s and early 1950s, film critics, international festivalgoers, and other studious viewers were swept up by the tide of Italian neorealism. Meanwhile, mainstream Italian audiences were indulging in a different kind of cinema experience: the sensational, extravagant melodramas of director Raffaello Matarazzo. Though turning to neorealism for character types and settings, these haywire hits about splintered love affairs and broken homes, all starring mustachioed matinee idol Amedeo Nazzari and icon of feminine purity Yvonne Sanson, luxuriate in delirious plot twists and overheated religious symbolism. Four of them are collected here, chronicles of men and women on long and serpentine roads to redemption, each less restrained and more wildly fun than the last.
Eclipse Series 28: The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kurahara
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Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios. The five films collected here hail from that era of the Japanese New Wave, and encompass breathless teen escapades, cruel crime stories, a Yukio Mishima adaptation, and even a Hollywood-inspired romantic comedy.
Eclipse Series 29: Aki Kaurismaki's Leningrad Cowboys
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In the late eighties, Aki Kaurismäki, a master of the deadpan, fashioned a waggish fish-out-of-water tale about a U.S. tour by “the worst rock-and-roll band in the world.” Leningrad Cowboys Go America’s posse of fur-coated, outrageously pompadoured hipsters struck such a chord with international audiences that the fictional band became a genuine attraction, touring the world. Later, Kaurismäki created a sequel, Leningrad Cowboys Meet Moses, and filmed a gigantic outdoor concert that the band put on in Helsinki, for the rollicking documentary Total Balalaika Show. With this Eclipse series, we present all three crackpot musical and comic odysseys, along with five Leningrad Cowboys music videos also directed by Kaurismaki.
Eclipse Series 30: Sabu!
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In the thirties and forties, the young Indian actor known as Sabu (born Selar Shaik) captured the hearts of moviegoers in Britain and the United States as a completely new kind of big-screen icon. Sabu was a maharaja’s elephant driver when he was cast in Elephant Boy, a Rudyard Kipling adaptation directed by documentary trailblazer Robert Flaherty and Zoltán Korda that would prove to be enormously popular. Sabu went on to headline a series of fantasies and adventures for the British film titans the Korda brothers, transcending the exoticism projected onto him by commanding the screen with effortless grace and humor. This series collects three of those lavish productions (which also included the classic The Thief of Bagdad_):_Elephant Boy, the colonialist adventure The Drum, and the timeless Jungle Book.
Eclipse Series 31: Three Popular Films by Jean-Pierre Gorin
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Jean-Pierre Gorin, widely known for his collaborations with Jean-Luc Godard in the Dziga Vertov Group (including Tout va bien), established his personal voice with this trio of fascinating, nontraditional documentaries. Made in Southern California after the filmmaker relocated there in the midseventies, Poto and Cabengo, Routine Pleasures, and My Crasy Life illuminate hidden corners of our culture. With these films, Gorin revealed himself as a major chronicler of American life at its most hauntingly enigmatic.
Eclipse Series 32: Pearls of the Czech New Wave
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Of all the cinematic New Waves that broke over the world in the 1960s, the one in Czechoslovakia was among the most fruitful, fascinating, and radical. With a wicked sense of humor and a healthy streak of surrealism, a group of fearless directors—including eventual Oscar winners Miloš Forman and Ján Kadár—began to use film to speak out about the hypocrisy and absurdity of the Communist state. A defining work was the 1966 omnibus film Pearls of the Deep, which introduced five of the movement’s essential voices: Věra Chytilová, Jaromil Jireš, Jiří Menzel, Jan Němec, and Evald Schorm. This series presents that title, along with five other crucial works that followed close on its heels, one from each of those filmmakers—some dazzlingly experimental, some arrestingly realistic, all singular expressions from a remarkable time and place.
Eclipse Series 33: Up All Night with Robert Downey Sr.
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Rarely do landmark works of cinema seem so . . . wrong. Robert Downey Sr. emerged as one of the most irreverent filmmakers of the New York underground of the sixties, taking no prisoners in his rough-and-tumble treatises on politics, race, and consumer culture. In his midnight-movie mainstay Putney Swope, an advertising agency is turned on its head when a militant black man takes over. like Swope, Downey held nothing sacred. Presented here are five of his most raucous and outlandish films, dating from 1964 to 1975, each a unique mix of the hilariously crude and the fiercely experimental.

Last edited by pro-bassoonist; 07-24-2012 at 04:49 AM.
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:44 AM   #3
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Eclipse Series 34: Jean Grémillon During the Occupation
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Though little known outside of France, Jean Grémillon was a consummate filmmaker from his country’s golden age. A classical violinist who turned to directing, he went on to make almost fifty films—from documentaries to avant-garde works to melodramas with major stars—in a thirty-year career. Three of his richest came during a dire period in French history: Remorques, starring Jean Gabin, was begun in 1939 but finished and released after Germany invaded France, and Lumičre d’été and Le ciel est ŕ vous were produced during the occupation. These character-driven dramas, the first two cowritten by legendary screenwriter Jacques Prévert, are humane, entertaining, and technically brilliant, and prove Grémillon to be one of cinema’s true hidden masters.
Eclipse Series 35: Maidstone and Other Films by Norman Mailer
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Norman Mailer is remembered for many things— his novels, his essays, his articles, his activism, his ego. one largely forgotten chapter of his life, however, is his late-sixties kamikaze-style plunge into making experimental films. These rough-hewn, self-financed, largely improvised metafictions are works of madness and bravado, all starring Mailer himself and with technical assistance from cinema verité trailblazers D. A. Pennebaker and Richard Leacock. The most fully realized of his directorial efforts is the blustering, brawling Maidstone, a shocking sign of the political times, in which Mailer plays a filmmaker and presidential candidate who may be the target of an assassination attempt. Along with Mailer’s other films of the period—Wild 90 and Beyond the Law—it shows an uncompromising artist in thrall to both himself and a new medium.
Eclipse Series 36: Three Wicked Melodramas from Gainsborough Pictures
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During the 1940s, realism reigned in British cinema—but not at Gainsborough Pictures. The studio, which had been around since the ’20s, found new success with a series of pleasurably preposterous costume melodramas. Audiences ate up these overheated films, which featured a stable of charismatic stars, including James Mason, Margaret Lockwood, Stewart Granger, and Phyllis Calvert. Though its films were immensely profitable in wartime and immediately after, Gainsborough did not outlive the decade. This set brings together a trio of Gainsborough’s most popular films—florid, visceral tales of secret identities, multiple personalities, and romantic betrayals.
Eclipse Series 37: When Horror Came to Shochiku
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Following years of a certain radioactive rubber beast’s domination of the box office, many Japanese studios tried to replicate the formula with their own brands of monster movies. One of the most fascinating dives into that fiendish deep end was the short-lived one from Shochiku, a studio better known for its elegant dramas by the likes of Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujiro Ozu. In 1967 and 1968, the company created four certifiably batty, low-budget fantasies, tales haunted by watery ghosts, plagued by angry insects, and stalked by aliens—including one in the form of a giant chicken-lizard. Shochiku’s outrageous and oozy horror period shows a studio leaping into the unknown, even if only for one brief, bloody moment.
Eclipse Series 38: Masaki Kobayashi Against the System

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One of the most important filmmakers to emerge from Japan’s cinematic golden age, Masaki Kobayashi is best remembered today for his 1959 epic The Human Condition, but that is just one of the blistering films he made in a career dedicated to criticizing his country’s rigid social and political orders. He first found his voice—rebellious, angry, engaged—in the fifties, following his life-altering experiences as a soldier in World War II; the four films collected here, made in the same period as The Human Condition, reflect Kobayashi’s coming into his own as an artist. He fought to get these powerful dramas made at a studio more oriented at the time toward quiet family melodramas; they are unforgettable pictures of a postwar Japan troubled by identity crises and moral corruption on scales both intimate and institutional.
Pro-B

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Old 07-24-2012, 05:24 AM   #4
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Very nice, Pro-B. Thanks for doing this. As a blu-ray convert who is reluctant to buy DVDs anymore, I don't hesitate about the Eclipse sets. Some of the best, most emotionally powerful and thought provoking films in the Criterion Collection - or any collection, for that matter - are in these sets. Movie fans owe it to themselves to try some of these, especially if you like Japanese cinema. And many of the individual movies in these sets are available for streaming on hulu plus, which is a great way to see some of these to determine if a particular set is something you might want to buy.

Among my personal favorites:

Larisa Shepitko
Kenji Mizoguchi's Fallen Women
Oshima's Outlaw Sixties
The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kurahara
The First Films of Samuel Fuller
Aki Kaurismaki's Proletariat Trilogy
Travels with Hiroshi Shimizu
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:56 AM   #5
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You are welcome, oildude. This thread is just for quick reference for members who are looking for info on some of these box sets - perhaps during sales times.

We continue to support Blu-ray

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Old 07-27-2012, 07:02 PM   #6
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Rights for Carlos Saura's films in the trilogy have reverted back to Studio Canal. If interested in the box set, it is probably a good idea to look for some copies left behind now.



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Old 08-06-2012, 07:53 PM   #7
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Thanks for this thread . I've been meaning to get the Ingmar Bergman set, but I'm still waiting for my first payment from my job, despite starting work 7 weeks ago. So I'm a bit behind on my purchases .
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:07 AM   #8
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You are very welcome, alehel

But if you could play Region-B discs, please consider this boxset first, it is fantastic:



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Old 08-07-2012, 09:16 AM   #9
P@t_Mtl P@t_Mtl is offline
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It's too bad these sets are over look by so many because they are DVD, some amazing movies in these sets
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Old 08-08-2012, 01:33 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pro-bassoonist View Post



Pro-B
I just got reimbursed $400 of my money that I spent through work, so I just might pick this up this week. Nice to see some Bergman on Region - B .
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:09 PM   #11
Xtempo Xtempo is offline
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What's the deal with the packaging? the slipcover to hold the multiple dvd cases imo kinda is terrible compared to the box used for there was a father and the only son. I think if they had the other one it be nicer and easier to keep.
I do like slipcovers but only if its over one case not like this.

Anyway I do hope to get more since this line does have good films like the main line does.

[Show spoiler]
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:41 PM   #12
MifuneFan MifuneFan is online now
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Yeah it is pretty terrible, and fairly pointless I'd say, but I guess it's Criterion trying hard to be "different"
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:34 PM   #13
SimBelm SimBelm is offline
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Yeah they should have a cardboard bottom to stop them falling out. To get around it I only cut the cellophane off the top, so I can get the cases out, leaving the rest of it on to support the bottom.
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Old 08-10-2012, 04:33 PM   #14
MifuneFan MifuneFan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimBelm View Post
Yeah they should have a cardboard bottom to stop them falling out. To get around it I only cut the cellophane off the top, so I can get the cases out, leaving the rest of it on to support the bottom.
hah that's what I did with a few of mine too
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Old 08-16-2012, 03:33 AM   #15
pro-bassoonist pro-bassoonist is offline
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Set to be released on 11/20:



AMAZON PRE-ORDER
http://www.amazon.com/Eclipse-37-Sho...horror+came+to

Quote:
FOUR-DVD BOX SET INCLUDES:
THE X FROM OUTER SPACE
GOKE, BODY SNATCHER FROM HELL
THE LIVING SKELETON
GENOCIDE
Following years of a certain radioactive rubber beast’s domination of the box office,
many Japanese studios tried to replicate the formula with their own brands of monster
movies. One of the most fascinating dives into that fiendish deep end was the shortlived
one from Shochiku, a studio better known for its elegant dramas by the likes of
Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujiro Ozu. In 1967 and 1968, the company created four certifiably
batty, low-budget fantasies, tales haunted by watery ghosts, plagued by angry insects,
and stalked by aliens—including one in the form of a giant chicken-lizard. Shochiku’s
outrageous and oozy horror period shows a studio leaping into the unknown, even if
only for one brief, bloody moment.

Quote:
THE X FROM OUTER SPACE
When a scientist crew returns from Mars with some
space spores that contaminated their ship, they
inadvertently bring about a nightmarish Earth invasion—
after the spores are analyzed in a lab, one escapes,
eventually growing into an enormous, rampaging
beaked beast. An intergalactic monster movie from
longtime Shochiku stable director Kazui Nihonmatsu,
The X from Outer Space was the first in the studio’s
short but memorable cycle of horror pictures.
1967 • 88 MINUTES • COLOR • MONAURAL •
IN JAPANESE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES • 2.35:1 ASPECT RATIO

GOKE, BODY SNATCHER FROM HELL
After an airplane is forced to crash-land in a remote
area, its passengers find themselves face-to-face with
an alien force that wants to possess their bodies and
souls—and perhaps take over the entire human race.
Filled with creatively repulsive effects—including a very
invasive bloblike life-form—Hajime Sato’s Goke, Body
Snatcher from Hell is a pulpy, apocalyptic gross-out.
1968 • 84 MINUTES • COLOR • MONAURAL •
IN JAPANESE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES • 2.35:1 ASPECT RATIO

THE LIVING SKELETON
In this atmospheric tale of revenge from beyond the
watery grave, a pirate-ransacked freighter’s violent
past comes back to haunt a young woman living in
a seaside town. Mixing elements of kaidan (ghost
stories), doppelganger thrillers, and mad-scientist
movies, Hiroshi Matsuno’s The Living Skeleton is
a wild and eerie work, with beautiful widescreen,
black-and-white cinematography.
1968 • 80 MINUTES • BLACK & WHITE • MONAURAL •
IN JAPANESE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES • 2.35:1 ASPECT RATIO


GENOCIDE
The insects are taking over in this nasty piece of
disaster horror directed by Kazui Nihonmatsu. A
group of military personnel transporting a hydrogen
bomb are left to figure out how and why swarms of
killer bugs took down their plane; the answer is more
deliriously nihilistic—and convoluted—than you could
imagine. Also known as War of the Insects, Genocide
enacts a cracked doomsday scenario like no other.
1968 • 84 MINUTES • COLOR • MONAURAL • IN JAPANESE WITH
ENGLISH SUBTITLES • 2.35:1 ASPECT RATIO
Pro-B

Last edited by pro-bassoonist; 08-16-2012 at 06:39 PM.
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Old 09-10-2012, 02:59 AM   #16
HyperRealist HyperRealist is offline
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Eclipse Series 5: The First Films of Samuel Fuller $10.49

http://www.amazon.com/Eclipse-Samuel...lipse+Series+5
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:24 AM   #17
Scottie Scottie is offline
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I feel like I should order #5
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Old 09-10-2012, 05:14 AM   #18
jrsl76 jrsl76 is offline
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It's a great set, but can they give us a crazy good price on something else I don't have - Dusan Makavejev, Chantal Akerman, etc, etc.
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Old 09-26-2012, 02:59 AM   #19
pro-bassoonist pro-bassoonist is offline
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I took this photo to post in the official Criterion thread we have, but will use it here as well.

Regardless of the fact that these films are available on DVD only, don't hesitate to pick up this set. I guarantee you won't be disappointed. This is brilliant cinema

Eclipse Series 34: Jean Grémillon During the Occupation





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Old 01-16-2013, 08:32 AM   #20
pro-bassoonist pro-bassoonist is offline
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Eclipse Series 38: Masaki Kobayashi Against the System DVD PRE-ORDER



Quote:
ECLIPSE SERIES 38: MASAKI KOBAYASHI AGAINST THE SYSTEM
One of the most important filmmakers to emerge from Japan’s cinematic golden age, Masaki Kobayashi is best remembered today for his 1959 epic The Human Condition, but that is just one of the blistering films he made in a career dedicated to criticizing his country’s rigid social and political orders. He first found his voice—rebellious, angry, engaged—in the fifties, following his life-altering experiences as a soldier in World War II; the four films collected here, made in the same period as The Human Condition, reflect Kobayashi’s coming into his own as an artist. He fought to get these powerful dramas made at a studio more oriented at the time toward quiet family melodramas; they are unforgettable pictures of a postwar Japan troubled by identity crises and moral corruption on scales both intimate and institutional.

FOUR-DVD BOX SET INCLUDES:

The Thick-Walled Room
Even early on in his directing career, Kobayashi didn’t shy away from controversy. Among the first Japanese films to deal directly with the scars of World War II, this drama about a group of rank-and-file Japanese soldiers jailed for crimes against humanity was adapted from the diaries of real prisoners. Because of its potentially inflammatory content, the film was shelved for three years before being released.

1953 • 110 minutes • Black & White • Monaural • In Japanese with English subtitles • 1.33:1 aspect ratio

I Will Buy You
Kobayashi’s pitiless take on Japan’s professional baseball industry is unlike any other sports film ever made. An excoriation of the inhumanity bred by a mercenary, bribery-fueled business, it follows the sharklike maneuvers of a scout dead set on signing a promising athlete to the team the Toyo Flowers.

1956 • 112 minutes • Black & White • Monaural • In Japanese with English subtitles • 1.33:1 aspect ratio

Black River
Perhaps Kobayashi’s most sordid film, Black River is an exposé of the rampant corruption on and around U.S. military bases following World War II. Kobayashi spirals out from the story of a love triangle that develops between a good-natured student, his innocent girlfriend, and a coldhearted petty criminal (The Human Condition’s Tatsuya Nakadai, in his first major role) to diagnose a social disease that had Japan slowly succumbing to lawlessness, devolving into gangsterism, violence, and prostitution.

1957 • 110 minutes • Black & White • Monaural • In Japanese with English subtitles • 1.33:1 aspect ratio

The Inheritance
On his deathbed, a wealthy businessman announces that his fortune is to be split equally among his three illegitimate children, whose whereabouts are unknown to his family and colleagues. A bevy of lawyers and associates then begin machinations to procure the money for themselves, enlisting the aid of impostors and blackmail. Yet all are outwitted by the cunning of the man’s secretary (The Makioka Sisters’ Keiko Kishi), in this entertaining condemnation of unchecked greed.

1962 • 108 minutes • Black & White • Monaural • In Japanese with English subtitles • 2.40:1 aspect ratio

TITLE: Eclipse Series 38: Masaki Kobayashi Against the System
CAT. NO: ECL171
UPC: 7-15515-10311-4
ISBN: 978-1-60465-693-0
SRP: $59.95
STREET: 4/16/13
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