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Phantasm I & II (Blu-ray)
$22.99
23 hrs ago
Black Widow 4K (Blu-ray)
$29.99
 
V for Vendetta 4K (Blu-ray)
$24.99
 
Beetlejuice 4K Gift Set (Blu-ray)
$27.99
 
Neon Genesis Evangelion: Complete Series (Blu-ray)
$37.99
 
Mad Max: The Road Warrior 4K (Blu-ray)
$25.99
1 day ago
Zack Snyder's Justice League Trilogy 4K (Blu-ray)
$69.99
 
Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!: The Complete Series (Blu-ray)
$37.99
 
The Protege 4K (Blu-ray)
$30.99
23 hrs ago
Steel Dawn (Blu-ray)
$12.69
1 day ago
Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome 4K (Blu-ray)
$25.99
1 day ago
Leprechaun: The Complete Movie Collection (Blu-ray)
$9.96
 
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Old Yesterday, 11:38 PM   #41
DVD Phreak DVD Phreak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PenguinInfinity View Post
Resolution is way more noticeable to most people than bitrate. It's also far easier to advertise. Streaming services will likely eventually offer 8K or even 16K because they can advertise those (and charge more for them). But high bitrate 1080p and 4K is drastically more expensive for them to provide with very little benefit.

The streaming services will use more efficient codecs so they can provide better quality without any extra bandwidth but they aren't going to up their spending by a factor of 10 just so they can advertise that they have high bitrates. Netflix actually lowered their bitrates last year but they're subscriber numbers continue to increase. Their customers clearly don't care about high bitrates so it would be ridiculous for them to spend more money then they have to.

https://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.ph...&id=1602743673
Netflix cut bitrates precisely because Internet speed still isn't enough. Would they cut bitrates for 1080p or 480p videos? That's because most users have Internet speed that is already adequate for those. 10 years from now, when most people (I hope) have 300+ Mbps Internet speed, new tech WILL be made, whatever that will be, to take advantage of that speed. To your point about the industry not spending more money than it has to, sometimes you spend money to save money -- such as not having to make Blu-rays when streaming videos equal or exceed their quality (which will happen, I assure you). To your point about the public only cares about resolution, the public DOESN'T have to like any new tech for a tech to thrive. Did the public clamor for candy-bar phones when iPhone came out, when most people still loved their flip phones and Blackberrys? When it comes to potentially transformational technology, the public is quite passive, I'm afraid. Did the public "ask" for the Internet, DVDs, Blu-rays? When a breakthrough occurs, it changes everyone's thinking. Prisoner-of-the-moment thinking sometimes fails us all.
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Old Today, 12:03 AM   #42
David McMinn David McMinn is offline
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It seems to me I've heard this before. Like LP (records) going the way of the doo doo (sp?). It seems to me records are strong and have made a comeback of sorts. I just purchased 3 cd's this month from Screen Archives Entertainment. What bothers me is what happens me when my iPod dies. I here the iPod is non existent even though you can purchase used one on eBay are Amazon market place. If they stop making the players that play them, then we have a problem.
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Old Today, 01:27 AM   #43
PenguinInfinity PenguinInfinity is offline
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Originally Posted by DVD Phreak View Post
To your point about the industry not spending more money than it has to, sometimes you spend money to save money -- such as not having to make Blu-rays when streaming videos equal or exceed their quality (which will happen, I assure you).
If better picture quality was the only reason that people bought physical media then DVDs wouldn't continue to be the best selling form of physical media. Regardless of how good streaming looks there will always be a market for physical media. Increasing spending on bandwidth absolutely will not save money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DVD Phreak View Post
To your point about the public only cares about resolution, the public DOESN'T have to like any new tech for a tech to thrive. Did the public clamor for candy-bar phones when iPhone came out, when most people still loved their flip phones and Blackberrys? When it comes to potentially transformational technology, the public is quite passive, I'm afraid. Did the public "ask" for the Internet, DVDs, Blu-rays? When a breakthrough occurs, it changes everyone's thinking. Prisoner-of-the-moment thinking sometimes fails us all.
All of those things are new technologies that companies could charge high amounts for. No streaming companies have ever charged extra for access to higher bitrates (without increasing resolution). If they increased bitrates they'd be spending drastically more money on bandwidth without making any more income from their customers. It doesn't make any business sense for them to do that.

If people want expensive high bitrate downloads that option already exists: Kaleidescape. But it is way less popular because most people don't care about high bitrates. High bitrate streaming and downloads will always be a niche just like 4K Blu-ray is.

Last edited by PenguinInfinity; Today at 01:48 AM.
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Old Today, 03:21 AM   #44
DVD Phreak DVD Phreak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PenguinInfinity View Post
If better picture quality was the only reason that people bought physical media then DVDs wouldn't continue to be the best selling form of physical media. Regardless of how good streaming looks there will always be a market for physical media. Increasing spending on bandwidth absolutely will not save money.



All of those things are new technologies that companies could charge high amounts for. No streaming companies have ever charged extra for access to higher bitrates (without increasing resolution). If they increased bitrates they'd be spending drastically more money on bandwidth without making any more income from their customers. It doesn't make any business sense for them to do that.

If people want expensive high bitrate downloads that option already exists: Kaleidescape. But it is way less popular because most people don't care about high bitrates. High bitrate streaming and downloads will always be a niche just like 4K Blu-ray is.
The whole physical media industry has been in decline compared to streaming so it doesn't matter how "well" DVDs sell. DVDs outsell other types of discs (a debatable point) the same way Juliet outlives Romeo. A tech doesn't have to completely disappear to become "essentially obsolete." Vinyls are outselling CDs too, by the way.

Again, Netflix wouldn't be spending much on high bandwidth if bandwidth weren't expensive in the first place. When we had dial-up, ISDN was expensive. When we had DSL, cable was expensive. And on and on.

To your point about companies always charging a lot for new tech, it's not so much what they charge, but whether the market is ready for the tech or not. If the tech ends up taking over the industry, it won't matter what it will cost. What we pay for it will become moot because we will all be using it! It's a pretty good bet that when streaming speed finally reaches the 30Mbps range, Blu-ray's days will be numbered.

Movie download services don't work because they are too inconvenient for users. Besides quality, users want convenience of content delivery the most. Another reason why high Internet speed = streaming speed approaching Blu-ray's = Blu-ray becoming obsolete. This example is not really about the public rejecting high bitrates.
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Old Today, 03:28 AM   #45
slimjean slimjean is offline
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CDs have become highly impractical, so it's not really surprising they are almost all but gone as a format.

We're talking about a disc that holds roughly ~700 MB of data, which is a pretty measly amount of storage. They take up a fair amount of space (granted way less then Vinyl) unless you are putting them in special carrying cases. Reality is most can easily store their entire music library (or at least their favorites) on a smartphone these days. They serve no real utility other then "good feels".


Movies/TV shows are a little different though...

1. Movies (especially in high quality) take up a lot of space. Until we reach Petabytes of cheap storage or compression becomes astoundingly simple and efficient - discs will remain sensible as storage. They are also relatively inexpensive.

The biggest downside of discs is their read speed, but for video playback it's generally fine anyways. I kind of doubt we'll see a transition of media to flash drives or an equivalent, but you never know.


2. License rights are always changing. If you want to watch a particular something it may not be readily available, even on the internet. This is hands down the biggest reason to purchase home media. Sadly a lot of people today errantly believe everything will just be available always, easily, and cheaply. Streaming will eventually become more expensive then cable ever was (sort of is). Possibly more obnoxious too.

The deciding factor in the future will really be the ease of acquiring digital copies, keeping them, and whether additional content (extras) are provided to make them more then glorified rentals.


3. Streaming is far from perfect. It's almost never been my experience to watch a movie at 100% perfect resolution start to finish. Also a lot of people can't stream 4K and won't be able to. 5G in theory is cool, but it has a real distance problem. That limitation my be overcome sometime, but likely only in larger metros. Also Gbps connections still aren't common. And even with all the bandwidth in the world, interruptions will remain a thing.

So while a disc is "archaic" it's also very reliable (usually if made for and cared for well). Tapes and HDDs will remain a storage medium for this very reason. Most don't know that SSDs have a much more finite lifespan of use (~20 years).


Movie collecting really has always been a niche though. Most folks really only bought movies and shows in the day (90s-00s), cause they couldn't rent them or didn't know they could rent them. Or it was more convenient to own then to try and rent a copy as needed.


Blu-ray will die and become wholly irrelevant and obsolete someday, but it is not this day!
Whatever. I burn my music to bluray with great artwork. Do complete catalogs on one disc in chrono order. Play all day with seamless uncompressed goodness.

Same as in my car bluray player.
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