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Old 11-14-2020, 02:04 AM   #1
chriscreep23 chriscreep23 is offline
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Default Does frequent playback deteriorate a blu ray disc?

I have read in the following article in the" Enviromental Conditons" section that
blu-rays "are also more susceptible to data loss due to their more refined method of data recording and playback from use over time. Due to this fact, they have a slightly smaller life expectancy compared to DVDs but not by a significant margin, perhaps 5% less than the 5-25 range typically given".

Is this true? Does the number of times I watch a blu-ray movie results to data loss? Is the DVD really better than the blu-ray in that department?

https://www.cdrom2go.com/blog/longev...-blu-ray-discs
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Old 11-14-2020, 03:15 AM   #2
Reignman35 Reignman35 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
I have read in the following article in the" Enviromental Conditons" section that
blu-rays "are also more susceptible to data loss due to their more refined method of data recording and playback from use over time. Due to this fact, they have a slightly smaller life expectancy compared to DVDs but not by a significant margin, perhaps 5% less than the 5-25 range typically given".

Is this true? Does the number of times I watch a blu-ray movie results to data loss? Is the DVD really better than the blu-ray in that department?

https://www.cdrom2go.com/blog/longev...-blu-ray-discs
I, for one, would NEVER buy a DVD over a Blu Ray of the same movie just because it might theoretically last longer. I want the best picture quality and the best sound possible. Buy what you like, enjoy them, watch them every day if you like, and if they go bad there's a great chance you can buy it again unless it's a rare one or out of print.

Plenty of other things to worry about than the lifespan of a particular disk or if you're somehow watching it "too much", which is honestly nearly impossible to quantify.
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Old 11-14-2020, 06:30 AM   #3
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I don't think frequent playback effects the discs because nothing actually physically to touches the discs. It's only a laser that reads the discs it shouldn't degrade the discs.
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Old 08-06-2022, 02:56 AM   #4
chriscreep23 chriscreep23 is offline
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I have read that some blu-ray discs from 2007 and 2008 have stopped playing in any blu-ray players and the odd thing is that the discs are in perfect condition. No damage or disc rot whatsover. I have the German blu-ray steelbook of Fight Club from 2008 that has stopped playing in any of my blu-ray or 4K players. Why is this happening? Do I have to worry about my longevity of my blu-ray discs or not?
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Old 08-06-2022, 05:36 AM   #5
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I know this is a little different but it is still a optical disc, I have Top Gun the CD since about 8, I'm 38 now it still plays the same today as it did 30 years ago.
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Old 08-06-2022, 10:46 AM   #6
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No
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Old 08-06-2022, 11:37 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada View Post
I don't think frequent playback effects the discs because nothing actually physically to touches the discs. It's only a laser that reads the discs it shouldn't degrade the discs.
Nope unless the disc itself goes bad due to either unknown factors or you scratch it pretty bad I do have about 15 odd bad discs in my collection which suddenly became unplayable. No amount of cleaning helped.
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Old 08-06-2022, 12:01 PM   #8
PenguinInfinity PenguinInfinity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
I have read in the following article in the" Enviromental Conditons" section that
blu-rays "are also more susceptible to data loss due to their more refined method of data recording and playback from use over time. Due to this fact, they have a slightly smaller life expectancy compared to DVDs but not by a significant margin, perhaps 5% less than the 5-25 range typically given".

Is this true? Does the number of times I watch a blu-ray movie results to data loss? Is the DVD really better than the blu-ray in that department?

https://www.cdrom2go.com/blog/longev...-blu-ray-discs
The article you quoted is talking about burned Blu-ray Discs (BD-Rs). 99.99% of studio releases are pressed Blu-ray discs; those will last much longer.
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Old 08-06-2022, 01:32 PM   #9
chriscreep23 chriscreep23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PenguinInfinity View Post
The article you quoted is talking about burned Blu-ray Discs (BD-Rs). 99.99% of studio releases are pressed Blu-ray discs; those will last much longer.
Yes I know. Do you have any blu-ray discs from 2006, 2007 or 2008 that play all the way through without a problem? I am not asking about DVD's because I also have DVD's from 1997 that play without a problem. I am asking specifically about blu-ray's because someone in the forum said that two discs from 2007 and 2008 can't play in any of his players even though the discs are in excellent condition. My 2008 Fight Club steelbook blu-ray disc from Germany doesn't play in any of my players even though it is in perfect condition. My blu-ray and 4K players can't even read the disc!
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Old 08-06-2022, 02:07 PM   #10
PenguinInfinity PenguinInfinity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
Yes I know. Do you have any blu-ray discs from 2006, 2007 or 2008 that play all the way through without a problem? I am not asking about DVD's because I also have DVD's from 1997 that play without a problem.
My response didn't mention DVDs at all. The article you quoted is talking about this type of disc:



Those are the discs that people can burn themselves. They are much less reliable than pressed discs and studios rarely use them.

I have plenty of early Blu-ray discs that still work perfectly. But with any format there will always be some discs that were manufactured poorly and will stop working.
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Old 08-06-2022, 02:26 PM   #11
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Seriously doubt playing alone would make a disc stop working. If it does stop working, most likely there was a manufacturing defect. I got burned cheapo cdrs from the early 2000s that still work, just as they did the day I burned them. Try to keep them in a decent environment. Mainly away from high heat, like in a hot car. Cold could have an effect as well, although less so.

Just to test out once, I left a small stack of burned dvdrs (that was going to throw away anyway) in my freezer for 3 months straight, and when I thawed them out and tried them, I could still access all the data just as good as new.

Left a bdr out in the snow outside (in a ziplock bag) in below zero weather for two days and that still worked perfectly fine.

Far from scientific results, but these discs are tougher than people think. Heat will be worse. May experiment with that next. If people complain about discs going bad (burned or pressed), it was probably because of bad manufacturing to begin with, or a bad burn for burned discs. I'd imagine if you take good care of your discs and keep them in a decent environment, they'll last your lifetime. Probably longer, assuming there was nothing wrong to begin with.
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Old 08-06-2022, 02:50 PM   #12
chriscreep23 chriscreep23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PenguinInfinity View Post
My response didn't mention DVDs at all. The article you quoted is talking about this type of disc:



Those are the discs that people can burn themselves. They are much less reliable than pressed discs and studios rarely use them.

I have plenty of early Blu-ray discs that still work perfectly. But with any format there will always be some discs that were manufactured poorly and will stop working.
I am not talking about BD-Rs. I asked you a different question.
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Old 08-06-2022, 03:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
I am not talking about BD-Rs. I asked you a different question.
In short, just put it this way. Assuming that you take care of your discs and there's no manufacturing errors to begin with (including things you can't see), at least 99% of your discs will probably last your lifetime. Which is all that matters really right? You aren't going to care about disc rot when you yourself are rotting away. In fact I'd trust optical discs for storage over every other form of storage or media, as of now in my experiences. I've had more HDDs fail on me than discs. Havent used SSDs enough yet to judge on that. Most discs fail because of manufacturing fail (even if not noticable right away) or human carelessness. Not from just wear so to speak.
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Old 08-06-2022, 03:59 PM   #14
PenguinInfinity PenguinInfinity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
I am not talking about BD-Rs. I asked you a different question.
But the article you quoted in your original post is talking about BD-Rs.

As far as I can tell you created this topic because you feared that pressed Blu-ray discs wouldn't last as long as pressed DVDs. You then posted a quote from an article that was talking about burned Blu-ray discs and DVDs and therefore didn't apply at all.

As others have stated: pressed discs (both Blu-ray and DVD) will likely outlive you unless there is a manufacturing error.

Last edited by PenguinInfinity; 08-06-2022 at 04:10 PM.
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Old 08-06-2022, 06:46 PM   #15
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscreep23 View Post
Do you have any blu-ray discs from 2006, 2007 or 2008 that play all the way through without a problem?
yes plenty
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Old 08-08-2022, 06:03 PM   #16
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If you play a disc repeatedly yes that does shorten the life of a disc since it adds heat and friction to the disc both of which will shorten a dvd or a blu rays life span. Products stored in optimal temperatures and limited humidity will also last longer. Actually killing a blu ray though playback would probably take 100s of thousands of playbacks at elevated temperatures though and probably millions to 10s of millions under optimal conditions and those are probably low balls of the stress tests they probably put these things under.

Overall blu ray use is a none factor in terms of life span of a blu ray compared to stuff like packaging, temperature, humidity, handling, factory errors and even if you store discs vertically vs horizontally.
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Old 08-28-2022, 08:05 PM   #17
chriscreep23 chriscreep23 is offline
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A guy posted on a facebook group that his 4K disc U.K. edition of Star Trek Beyond has bronzing which means disc rot! I am shocked!!! This was pressed in 2016!!! He also said that his blu-ray disc of the same edition had the same problem!
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