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Old 09-13-2022, 05:05 PM   #1
andjar01 andjar01 is offline
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Default 1TB optical disc by Folio Photonics

Future 8 to 16 layers high capacity low cost disc.
These would be fantastic for TV series collecting or for those big Criterion sets.

https://www.techradar.com/news/this-...b-optical-disc
https://www.whathifi.com/news/is-blu...physical-media
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Old 09-13-2022, 05:22 PM   #2
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Will not happen. It's a write once archival disc system.

For the industry to take on a new disc as complicated as this one is the question would be why? Disc sales are dropping on an average of 18% a year. You don't introduce new technology in that kind of a market.
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Old 09-13-2022, 08:54 PM   #3
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You're probably right. But still...if the players won't be extremely expensive i can see some collector dedicated blu ray labels releasing some nice bundles on this format.
Sure...it will be very niche ....like the "laserdisc" of the future.

The home theatre market is getting bigger and more and more home theatre enthusiasts are starting to collect physical media.

Being able to let's say buy something like the whole 4K Hitchcock universal filmography or the whole Star Wars saga, the complete Game Of Thrones on a single disc/small package might attract more people than we think.

Last but not least a potential 8k phisical format?
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Old 09-13-2022, 11:18 PM   #4
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andjar01 View Post
You're probably right. But still...if the players won't be extremely expensive i can see some collector dedicated blu ray labels releasing some nice bundles on this format.
Sure...it will be very niche ....like the "laserdisc" of the future.
The players would be expensive. It's a new technology which is always expensive. You do realize this is a small startup company right. If the announcement came from Sony that might be different,

Quote:
The home theatre market is getting bigger and more and more home theatre enthusiasts are starting to collect physical media.
You're not paying attention. The physical disc market is shrinking at a rate of 18% a year. That wouldn't happen if new collectors entered the market. It would be growing instead.

Quote:
Being able to let's say buy something like the whole 4K Hitchcock universal filmography or the whole Star Wars saga, the complete Game Of Thrones on a single disc/small package might attract more people than we think.
It's a moot point because it just isn't going to happen. This disc format is for archival purposes. Move data off of disc drives that isn't being used on a regular basis and put it on an optical disc. Why they want to do that when we are using magnetic tape for that purpose and have been for over 40 years - they claim a savings in the media. Most people who control IT departments don't seek out new technology. If it isn't broken - don't fix it.

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Last but not least a potential 8k phisical format?
Sorry - no 8K physical format. 4K UHD-BD is the last physical format - enjoy it.
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Old 09-17-2022, 05:51 PM   #5
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andjar01 View Post
You're probably right. But still...if the players won't be extremely expensive i can see some collector dedicated blu ray labels releasing some nice bundles on this format.
Sure...it will be very niche ....like the "laserdisc" of the future.
there is a reason they are talking about archiving and not distribution media. A 1TB disk for 5$ that needs 0 electricity and is way more robust is interesting for storing one or two copies of large amounts of data that is seldom used. But a replicated BD costs pennies in plastic and seconds to make while this will end up costing thousands of time more.

the only way something like this can go anywhere is if the method can be applied to replicating.

as for 8k physical media distribution I think we will see them but at this point I don't think they will be based on this tech.
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Old 09-18-2022, 01:41 AM   #6
unberechenbar unberechenbar is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony P View Post
as for 8k physical media distribution I think we will see them but at this point I don't think they will be based on this tech.
So you don't think it will be disc-based?
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Old 09-18-2022, 10:54 AM   #7
lgans316 lgans316 is offline
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I would buy this if we have players that can playback files from this disc. For instance, we can have about 15-20 full flat 4K MKV rips on one disc. This disc wojld not only give us long shelf life as opposed to HDDs but also less shelf space and the ability to carry anywhere and bulk watch.

Would be interesting to see if this hits the market.
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Old 09-18-2022, 11:19 AM   #8
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Making Data Archives Active

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Folio Photonics is reenergizing storage media innovation with the first-ever enterprise-scale, immutable active archive solution that delivers breakthrough cost, security, and sustainability benefits.
https://foliophotonics.com/

Sorry guys - no movies or TV shows.
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Old 09-18-2022, 06:34 PM   #9
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unberechenbar View Post
So you don't think it will be disc-based?
I did not say that. Folio (if we take it at face value) managed to make a big disk that is write once. I am saying a write once disk can't be used for movie distribution. I don't know where the replication tech is today but my guess it is between 2-5 seconds to make a disk using replication (going with 5 that was back at the begining and the highest number) that means one line can make 12 copies a minute, 720 an hour and 17,280 a day. On the other hand if it is duplication, you need something like
this with multiple bays and even then, something like this with
10 bays will take ~15 minutes for 10 copies 40 copies an hour, 960 a day and I am guessing something like this (a lot more data to write) won't be anywhere near as fast

that makes it an impractical solution for anything that is mass market.
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Old 09-18-2022, 11:13 PM   #10
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 49218 View Post
I thought pressed discs were all non-rewritable.
Pressed discs are BD-ROMs. Once write are BD-Rs
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Old 09-18-2022, 11:15 PM   #11
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony P View Post
I did not say that. Folio (if we take it at face value) managed to make a big disk that is write once. I am saying a write once disk can't be used for movie distribution. I don't know where the replication tech is today but my guess it is between 2-5 seconds to make a disk using replication (going with 5 that was back at the begining and the highest number) that means one line can make 12 copies a minute, 720 an hour and 17,280 a day. On the other hand if it is duplication, you need something like
this with multiple bays and even then, something like this with
10 bays will take ~15 minutes for 10 copies 40 copies an hour, 960 a day and I am guessing something like this (a lot more data to write) won't be anywhere near as fast

that makes it an impractical solution for anything that is mass market.
Are you leaving enough time to apply the hard coating on BDs? Doesn't appear you did.
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Old 09-18-2022, 11:24 PM   #12
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The only reason to use 1tb discs for commercial distribution is lossless video. The last time commercial discs didn't use lossy compression techniques was the laserdisc format. Currently, the best lossless codec is FFV1, which reduces uncompressed video to 1/3 filesize. The other advantage of FFV1 is that it doesn't require licensing costs like the MPEG codecs since it is free and open-source.

IMO, if lossy compression is done correctly (especially 35mbps + 2-pass encoding for blu-ray), compression artifacts are difficult to spot unless you're trying to look for it. Both UHD (100mb discs) and Blu-Ray (50gb) offer more than enough maximum disc space for a competent lossy encode. The only publishers I can see producing commercial discs for this format are publishers that already know how to produce a proper encode. I don't see Mill Creek using these anytime soon.

With physical media sales declining every year, combined with inflation, prices for physical media will continue to rise. Offering a superior home video format will help to justify higher prices, but only if consumers can really notice the difference and labels support the format. I don't see that happening anytime soon. The difference between laserdisc and VHS was significant in the 80's and 90's. I don't believe the difference between digital lossless video and a properly encoded blu-ray or UHD is nearly as noticeable.
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Old 09-22-2022, 10:22 PM   #13
stonesfan129 stonesfan129 is offline
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I feel like the discs would run into quality control issues like I am seeing now with BD100 discs for 4K Blu-ray. I have had very few that don't skip or pixelate somewhere even on a clean disc and across different players. Doesn't happen with BD66 discs.
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Old 09-24-2022, 02:03 AM   #14
HDTV1080P HDTV1080P is offline
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Sony, Panasonic, and OPPO 4K players playback BD-100 discs perfectly fine.
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Old 09-24-2022, 02:17 AM   #15
David M David M is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andjar01 View Post
Future 8 to 16 layers high capacity low cost disc.
These would be fantastic for TV series collecting or for those big Criterion sets.

https://www.techradar.com/news/this-...b-optical-disc
https://www.whathifi.com/news/is-blu...physical-media
This happens every couple of years. Someone in the data storage space announces some new high capacity innovation, and tech blogs miss the point and suggest it will be used for consumer home entertainment, ignoring the market reality of the fact that there are formats right now that do the job fine.
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Old 09-24-2022, 03:51 PM   #16
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee A Stewart View Post
Are you leaving enough time to apply the hard coating on BDs? Doesn't appear you did.
yes
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Old 09-24-2022, 05:02 PM   #17
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony P View Post
yes
No you didn't. There are two seperate coatings: One is for protection against scratches, and the other protects against stains and oils. It's made by TDK and called Durabis.
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Old 09-24-2022, 06:12 PM   #18
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee A Stewart View Post
No you didn't. There are two seperate coatings: One is for protection against scratches, and the other protects against stains and oils. It's made by TDK and called Durabis.
when a ROM is created everything that is needed for the disk to work is included in the timing numbers. it does not matter if we are talking BD, DVD or CD and what each of them require.

what i9s not included in the seconds of replicating a disk is packaging which happens at a later stage.
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Old 09-24-2022, 06:26 PM   #19
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony P View Post
when a ROM is created everything that is needed for the disk to work is included in the timing numbers. it does not matter if we are talking BD, DVD or CD and what each of them require.

what i9s not included in the seconds of replicating a disk is packaging which happens at a later stage.
Your claim is making a complere BD-Rom with movie at 5 seconds - ready for packaging. Way too short a time period. Injection molding requires a release - that can take 5 seconds by itself. Then you have the 2 coating applications. First one has to dry before the second is applied.

You guessed too short. Just admit it and move on.
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Old 09-24-2022, 10:37 PM   #20
Wendell R. Breland Wendell R. Breland is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee A Stewart View Post
Your claim is making a complere BD-Rom with movie at 5 seconds - ready for packaging. Way too short a time period. Injection molding requires a release - that can take 5 seconds by itself. Then you have the 2 coating applications. First one has to dry before the second is applied.

You guessed too short. Just admit it and move on.
Searched for a YouTube video that showed the entire process of making a BD but can not find it anymore. Never timed it but it was a short time from mold to silkscreen but I would say 20 to 25 seconds as a guess. The hard coat in that manufactures line was just one coat, a spin process with UV drying.

No matter, there are manufactures sites and they claim to be able to do millions of disc per year.
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