Best Blu-ray Movie Deals


Best Blu-ray Movie Deals, See All the Deals »
Top deals | New deals  
 All countries United States United Kingdom Canada Germany France Spain Italy Australia Netherlands Japan Mexico
Columbia Classics Collection: Volume 1 4K (Blu-ray)
$101.63
 
Crash (Blu-ray)
$29.49
23 hrs ago
Mad Max 4K (Blu-ray)
$26.49
 
Little Monsters (Blu-ray)
$9.99
10 hrs ago
Universal Classic Monsters: The Essential Collection (Blu-ray)
$29.99
 
Rick and Morty: Season 4 (Blu-ray)
$27.99
10 hrs ago
Total Recall 4K (Blu-ray)
$17.99
 
Judy (Blu-ray)
$9.99
 
Amores Perros (Blu-ray)
$29.49
 
Whiplash 4K (Blu-ray)
$19.96
 
Batman Beyond: The Complete Series (Blu-ray)
$38.48
18 hrs ago
Pitch Perfect Trilogy (Blu-ray)
$14.99
 
What's your next favorite movie?
Join our movie community to find out


Image from: Life of Pi (2012)
Old 08-16-2019, 02:53 PM   #1
UpsetSmiley UpsetSmiley is offline
Power Member
 
UpsetSmiley's Avatar
 
Oct 2013
UK
5
Default How do studios print disc labels?

Something I've been thinking about is how do factories transfer images onto discs? At home I only know of printing onto a disc using ink, but studio pressed discs are done much differently. Anyone know about the process involved here?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 03:22 PM   #2
Wendell R. Breland Wendell R. Breland is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Wendell R. Breland's Avatar
 
Sep 2006
North Carolina
46
613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsetSmiley View Post
Something I've been thinking about is how do factories transfer images onto discs? At home I only know of printing onto a disc using ink, but studio pressed discs are done much differently. Anyone know about the process involved here?
Just a guess but I would say offset printing, some info here.
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
UpsetSmiley (08-16-2019)
Old 08-16-2019, 04:12 PM   #3
UpsetSmiley UpsetSmiley is offline
Power Member
 
UpsetSmiley's Avatar
 
Oct 2013
UK
5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post
Just a guess but I would say offset printing, some info here.
Thank you, I'm surprised there isn't more info out there about the process involved in making DVDs/Blu-rays.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 05:08 PM   #4
alchav21 alchav21 is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
alchav21's Avatar
 
Apr 2009
ST George, Utah
1
2
2
49
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsetSmiley View Post
Thank you, I'm surprised there isn't more info out there about the process involved in making DVDs/Blu-rays.
The Studios really don't want you to make your own Discs. When I Backed-up my DVD's and Blu-rays I printed the picture on the paper sleeve for DVD's and printed an insert on thin plastic case for Blu-rays. Just used a marker to label the Disc, because putting a sticker on the Disc throws the balance of the spinning Disc.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2019, 05:25 PM   #5
UpsetSmiley UpsetSmiley is offline
Power Member
 
UpsetSmiley's Avatar
 
Oct 2013
UK
5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alchav21 View Post
The Studios really don't want you to make your own Discs. When I Backed-up my DVD's and Blu-rays I printed the picture on the paper sleeve for DVD's and printed an insert on thin plastic case for Blu-rays. Just used a marker to label the Disc, because putting a sticker on the Disc throws the balance of the spinning Disc.
I design my own cover art and disc labels for home videos and wanted it to have as much of a realistic feel as possible. The method shown in the link above is completely out of the question for anyone who doesn't have access to sophisticated machinery. Inkjet printing is great but I'm always looking to one up myself.
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
alchav21 (08-16-2019)
Old 08-18-2019, 04:42 PM   #6
Anthony P Anthony P is offline
Blu-ray Baron
 
Jul 2007
Montreal, Canada
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsetSmiley View Post
I design my own cover art and disc labels for home videos and wanted it to have as much of a realistic feel as possible. The method shown in the link above is completely out of the question for anyone who doesn't have access to sophisticated machinery. Inkjet printing is great but I'm always looking to one up myself.
there is also silkscreen and inkjet printing
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2019, 07:23 PM   #7
Wendell R. Breland Wendell R. Breland is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Wendell R. Breland's Avatar
 
Sep 2006
North Carolina
46
613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsetSmiley View Post
I design my own cover art and disc labels for home videos and wanted it to have as much of a realistic feel as possible. The method shown in the link above is completely out of the question for anyone who doesn't have access to sophisticated machinery. Inkjet printing is great but I'm always looking to one up myself.
Me too, been designing and printing my color labels for many years. And don't worry about disc balance, any reputable label (Avery, Neato) should not cause you any problems.

In some cases toner type color printing can exceed the quality of inkjet printing. Dye Sublimation type printers can print nice images.

Have you ever tried printing direct to disc? I know Epson (here) makes printers that can do this, there may be others. Most of the blank disc that I purchase is ready for direct printing but never owned a capable printer.

As usual, just how much do want to spend!
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
UpsetSmiley (08-18-2019)
Old 08-18-2019, 08:06 PM   #8
UpsetSmiley UpsetSmiley is offline
Power Member
 
UpsetSmiley's Avatar
 
Oct 2013
UK
5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post
Me too, been designing and printing my color labels for many years. And don't worry about disc balance, any reputable label (Avery, Neato) should not cause you any problems.

In some cases toner type color printing can exceed the quality of inkjet printing. Dye Sublimation type printers can print nice images.

Have you ever tried printing direct to disc? I know Epson (here) makes printers that can do this, there may be others. Most of the blank disc that I purchase is ready for direct printing but never owned a capable printer.

As usual, just how much do want to spend!
Thanks! I print directly on disc, it can be a hassle at first trying to print within the boundaries so there's no over spill but it's worth it and I recommend them. They're very affordable nowadays as well. I bought an Epson inkjet printer in 2017 for 50, roughly $60.

I'd love to be able to replicate the look of a professionally produced disc, especially the translucent effect on some of them. I know this example is bland as there's no artwork in particular but I still like the simplicity of the design.

  Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2019, 08:36 PM   #9
slimdude slimdude is online now
Blu-ray Champion
 
slimdude's Avatar
 
Apr 2009
-
-
-
8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsetSmiley View Post
Something I've been thinking about is how do factories transfer images onto discs? At home I only know of printing onto a disc using ink, but studio pressed discs are done much differently. Anyone know about the process involved here?
The general public doesn't really know how movie studios print their DVD and Blu-ray discs, unless they are an employee at the facility, and they probably had to sign a confidentiality form, promising not to reveal any of the company's production procedures and supliers to the public, prior being hired. I'm assuming they use professional automated disc printing equipment made exclusively for that purpose, that may not be available for home use. I use to work at a corrugated box plant for many years, and we use multiple rotary printing, and die cutting machines, with the customer's name and logos that are pre-mounted onto a heavy duty plastic sheets. The sheets were aligned and stapled on the machine, then loaded various colors of ink into their designated compartments for the initial setup. The corrugated was manually fed into the machine to be cut, printed, fold and glued. The setup is performed the same repeatedly for each and every customer, to produce the amount of boxes as requested by the customer. The printing process of discs could be similar, but not exact.

Last edited by slimdude; 08-18-2019 at 08:50 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
UpsetSmiley (08-18-2019)
Old 08-18-2019, 10:15 PM   #10
Wendell R. Breland Wendell R. Breland is offline
Blu-ray Guru
 
Wendell R. Breland's Avatar
 
Sep 2006
North Carolina
46
613
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by slimdude View Post
The printing process of discs could be similar, but not exact.
The following was in the reference in my first post. For high volume, offset printing makes the most sense.

  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
gkolb (08-19-2019), UpsetSmiley (08-19-2019)
Old 08-18-2019, 10:54 PM   #11
slimdude slimdude is online now
Blu-ray Champion
 
slimdude's Avatar
 
Apr 2009
-
-
-
8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post
The following was in the reference in my first post. For high volume, offset printing makes the most sense.
I don't know if it's the exact process that movie studios use, but I've figured that a high tech, automated machineries are used to print and label thousands of units efficiently, a process that only a manufacturer can incorporate in their facility. An average consumer couldn't even afford anything like that for home use, that would cost millions of dollars to install, and a technician to setup and adjust all of the controls accordingly to specifications of the disc.

Last edited by slimdude; 08-18-2019 at 11:32 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2019, 12:33 AM   #12
jvonl jvonl is online now
Expert Member
 
Jan 2011
Upstate New York
132
1024
Default

I worked for the NYS Archives for some years. When they started putting copies of historical documents on dvd's instead of paper copies for customers, they bought a machine that printed the labels on the discs. All I know is that it didn't cost millions. It was designed solely to print the Archive logo onto cd's and dvd's. I'm guessing that it was an ink jet process. You could email the Archives and someone could probably provide more details.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2019, 01:21 AM   #13
slimdude slimdude is online now
Blu-ray Champion
 
slimdude's Avatar
 
Apr 2009
-
-
-
8
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jvonl View Post
I worked for the NYS Archives for some years. When they started putting copies of historical documents on dvd's instead of paper copies for customers, they bought a machine that printed the labels on the discs. All I know is that it didn't cost millions. It was designed solely to print the Archive logo onto cd's and dvd's. I'm guessing that it was an ink jet process. You could email the Archives and someone could probably provide more details.
I bet that machine wasn't anything near as sophisticated, and high tech like the one in the video.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2019, 01:22 AM   #14
gkolb gkolb is online now
Blu-ray Samurai
 
gkolb's Avatar
 
Feb 2012
Bakersfield, CA
374
859
114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post
The following was in the reference in my first post. For high volume, offset printing makes the most sense.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ElD...ature=youtu.be
Wendell, very nice find.
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
Wendell R. Breland (08-19-2019)
Old 08-19-2019, 01:43 AM   #15
jvonl jvonl is online now
Expert Member
 
Jan 2011
Upstate New York
132
1024
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by slimdude View Post
I bet that machine wasn't anything near as sophisticated, and high tech like the one in the video.
Well, of course not. Didn't imply that it was. However, it would certainly work for folks who want to make their own discs.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2019, 02:55 AM   #16
Phillip c. Niethe Phillip c. Niethe is offline
Special Member
 
Phillip c. Niethe's Avatar
 
Jul 2015
Flat earth, upper Left hand Corner:)
166
166
1
4
Default

Genetically modified human monkey hybrids with colored sharpies on redbull and Pez.
  Reply With Quote
Thanks given by:
gkolb (08-19-2019)
Old 11-29-2019, 02:13 PM   #17
Phillip c. Niethe Phillip c. Niethe is offline
Special Member
 
Phillip c. Niethe's Avatar
 
Jul 2015
Flat earth, upper Left hand Corner:)
166
166
1
4
Default

I'm assuming since no one has posted an answer after mine then the G.M.H.M. theory has been accepted
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2019, 10:44 PM   #18
Lee A Stewart Lee A Stewart is offline
Blu-ray Samurai
 
Lee A Stewart's Avatar
 
Jan 2019
Albuquerque, NM
Default



https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/dvd2.htm
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back   Blu-ray Forum > Blu-ray > Blu-ray Technology and Future Technology


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:49 PM.