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Old 03-11-2013, 05:50 AM   #1
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Default R.I.P. - Remembering lesser known Hollywood &/or movie related celebrities

In this thread please post obituaries of lesser known Hollywood and other movie related celebrities. Please feel free to post a separate thread for more notable individuals who fall in this category. And for those who have no interest in learning about, remembering or honoring individuals posted here, you don't have to read this thread.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:53 AM   #2
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"Two Lovers" Screenwriter & Director/Actor Richard Menello R.I.P.

In "That Menello Show" - Episode 1 "How Bogie Got Screwed By Warner Brothers Part 1"
"Bogie Bonus"

"Though he wasn't a household name, director/screenwriter Ric Menello, 60 was one of the most influential visionaries behind the emergence of commercial hip-hop in the 1980s.

The co-director of the Beastie Boys' landmark "(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party)" video passed away on Friday of a heart attack, leaving behind a fascinating mix of high/low art that his friends and admirers said perfectly summed up his lifelong aesthetic.

"He was amazing and the kind of insane that we love and the kind of insane that changes the world," said writer Dan Charnas, who spent hours interviewing Menello for his book "The Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip-Hop."

In addition to his co-directing credits on music videos, Menello wrote the 2008 Joaquin Phoenix/Gwyneth Paltrow film "Two Lovers," which, at the time, was referred to by the actor as his big screen retirement. He also wrote another Phoenix film, "Lowlife," which is slated for release this year, as well as Run-DMC's "Tougher Than Leather."

Menello met the Beastie Boys and producer/Def Jam co-founder Rick Rubin when he worked part time as a desk clerk at Rubin's dorm at NYU. "Those guys would hang out at the front desk watching movies with him and as Rick started bands and the label ... Menello was along for the ride," said Charnas, who worked for Rubin at the Def American label. "But more importantly, as all this stuff is starting, Menello helps to form Rick's aesthetic. Rick knows what he likes, but it takes Menello to help Rick understand it."

As Rubin was launching the Beasties, he tapped Menello and his roommate, Adam Dubin, to co-direct "Fight," which helped launch the trio into global superstardom. "Rick loved Abbott and Costello ... and he would make his friends stay up to watch this old timey TV show that he had no business liking," Charnas said of the legendary slapstick duo. "Rick liked the whole lowbrow setup of the thing, but what Menello helped Rick understand was that it was not the slapstick that Rick liked, but the combination of that lowbrow slapstick with a very highbrow sophisticated form."

That high-low mix is what Rubin would pursue at Def Jam, no more so than on "Fight," which mixed the song's grunty, three-chord simplicity with a re-enactment of the beloved 1961 Audrey Hepburn romantic comedy "Breakfast at Tiffany's."
"Menello helped explain to Rick why he liked Abbott and Costello and professional wrestling ... there was nothing more lowbrow, but it was sophisticated with all the theater and costuming ... and Rick took that ethos and changed the world with it," said Charnas.

Menello and Dubin also hooked up for the Beasties' "No Sleep Till Brooklyn" clip, as well as LL Cool J's "Going Back to Cali."

Following the death of Beastie Adam Yauch last May, MTV News spoke to Menello about the shoot for the "Fight" video.

Menello said he had no clue at the time that "Fight" would have the kind of longevity it has. "It was kind of a dumb video, but it was done in a very sophisticated way visually. I often say the style of the video is 'stupidity done in an intelligent way,' " he said, summing up his signature aesthetic.

"If I knew that people were going to be looking at them 26 years later, I would've done better!" he joked. "I wrote the movie 'Tougher Than Leather,' which the Beastie Boys appeared in, then Rick Rubin suggested I would be a good director for 'Fight for Your Right' because I had new ideas and it was better to fail at a new idea than to succeed with a crappy old idea," Menello explained.

Writer Rob Tannenbaum interviewed Menello for several hours for his 2011 book, "I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution," and said he got the sense that Menello had a photographic memory when it came to film.

"He could talk about a specific film in such detail that it almost seemed as if he'd watched it that morning," he said. "The word that kept coming up to describe his knowledge was 'encyclopedic' ... The reason why he told me he initially said no to directing [the 'Fight' video] was that directing was sacred to him."

Asked if Menello's contribution to the early careers of the Beastie Boys and LL Cool J was an integral part of their success, Tannenbaum said without a doubt.

"There are no more than a handful of music videos that have done more for a band's career and more vividly described their image than 'Fight For Your Right To Party,' did for the Beastie Boys," he said. "He was one of the great characters I've met in the music business and he was an original."

A memorial service is scheduled for Tuesday."http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/170...-menello.jhtml
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:11 AM   #3
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Anime and voice actor for actors like John Wayne, etc., Goro Naya, R.I.P.


Pink Jacket Poop/Goro Naya Zenigata Tribute

"Goro Naya, the original voice actor for Inspector Zenigata in the long-running Lupin III anime franchise, passed away on March 5 at 3:00 a.m. due to chronic respiratory failure. He was 83. He leaves behind his wife, voice actress Kachiko Hino.

Naya's management, Theatre Echo, made the announcement of his passing on Monday. Naya was born in Hokkaido, and he dropped out of Ritsumeikan University to enter the Tōdō acting troupe. He made his debut as an actor in 1950s, and after joining Theatre Echo, he became a popular dubbing actor for overseas films.

He was the Japanese dub voice for such actors as Rick Jason (Hanley in Combat!), Clark Gable, Charlton Heston, and John Wayne. Thanks to his deep voice, Naya not only became famous for Zenigata, but also Captain Jūzō Okita in Space Battleship Yamato (Captain Avatar in Star Blazers), Yupa in Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, and the Shocker leader in various Kamen Rider series.

Naya played Zenigata as recently as last year, when the veteran cast reunited for the "Lupin Ikka Seizoroi" (Lupin Family Lineup) short. The Lupin III: Chi no Kokuin Eien no Mermaid television special and the Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine television series introduced Kouichi Yamadera as the second-generation voice of Zenigata."http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news...ya-passes-away
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:15 AM   #4
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Richard Burton's first wife & actress, Sybil Williams, R.I.P.


here's Richard Burton singing in "Women of Dolwyn" (aka "The Last Days of Dolwyn"), his first movie role in 1949

"Sybil Christopher, a co-founder of Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theatre, has died, according to a notice posted Saturday on the Bay Street website. She was 83.

Bay Street did not provide a cause of death or date.

Ms. Christopher, born Sybil Williams, founded Bay Street Theater with Emma Walton and Stephen Hamilton in 1991 and served as its artistic director for nearly 22 years before stepping down in 2012 to become a consultant for the 299-seat theater.

She had been married to actor Richard Burton for 15 years before they divorced in 1963, and was married to Jordan Christopher for 33 years until his death in 1996. [From IMDb: Met husband Richard Burton on the set of his first film Women of Dolwyn (1949). They had two children, Kate and Jessica. Jessica suffered from severe autism and was institutionalized by the age of six.]


A former actress, she also was the founder of the New Theatre on 54th Street in New York City.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced."http://www.27east.com/news/article.c...eatre-Has-Died
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:43 AM   #5
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"A Bullet for the General"/"Amityville II: The Possession" Director Damiano Damiani R.I.P.


"Amityville II" Trailer
"A Bullet for the General" Trailer

"Damiano Damiani, who has died aged 90, was a director of Italian popular films and television. He was best known for La Piovra (The Octopus, 1984), an internationally successful TV series about the mafia, and made several mafia-themed films and TV movies, but his range was much wider.

Born in Pordenone, north-east Italy, he began his career in the 1940s, working in the art department and directing documentaries. As popular Italian cinema boomed in the 1960s, he began to make personal pictures, westerns, comedies, political thrillers and horror films. If you have only seen Amityville II: The Possession (1982), his one American movie, you have seen Damiani at his least inspired. In that film, the camera followed potential victims around a haunted house in a style made tedious four years earlier by John Carpenter's Halloween. According to the New York Times review, Damiani managed "to make sensation, blood, sex and suspense become a monotonous way of life".

Making sensation- and suspense-filled genre pictures was Damiani's way of life. When the scripts were bad, the resulting films could indeed be monotonous. But when they were good, the films could be extraordinary – as in the case of A Bullet for the General (known as Quien Sabe? in Italy and Spain), his first western. It was made in 1966 at the beginning of the golden age of Italian westerns: Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Sergio Corbucci's Django and Sergio Sollima's The Big Gundown were all shot that year.

A Bullet for the General is the story of a mysterious American, seemingly adrift in revolutionary Mexico, who falls in love with a social bandit, El Chuncho. The screenplay was co-authored by Franco Solinas (The Battle of Algiers). Like many Italian film-makers of the time, Solinas was a leftist and believed that film – not just art film, but popular, commercial cinema – demanded storytelling which would radicalise the viewer, and encourage social change. Damiani clearly agreed, and together the two men created a subgenre: the tortilla western, set south of the border, where revolutionary Mexicans form uneasy alliances with interventionist gringos against their respective governments.

In A Bullet for the General, Bill Tate, the mysterious American, turns out to be a paid assassin, hired by the authorities to murder a revolutionary general. There are many twists and turns to the narrative, all vividly realised by Damiani. At one point a trainload of government soldiers is trapped in a canyon, unable to proceed, because one of the officers has been kidnapped and crucified on the tracks up ahead. Ennio Morricone provided a thrilling score, and the art direction seems particularly authentic – down to the wicker coffins of dead children in a Native American village. Did Sam Peckinpah see Damiani's film before he made The Wild Bunch (1969)? It shares location, theme (love and betrayal among men) and visual aspect. Solinas wrote similar scripts for Corbucci (A Professional Gun, 1968), Giulio Petroni (Tepepa, 1969) and Giulio Pontecorvo (Queimada, aka Burn!, 1969).

These were but a few of the tortillas that flourished in the wake of Damiani's western. However, he seems to have resisted invitations to return to the dusty trail – at least until 1975, when he was contacted by Leone who, stung by the unfavourable reaction to his own tortilla western, Duck, You Sucker (1971), had retired from directing. Instead, he was "producing" – which involved hiring a former assistant as the director, and then turning up on set. This had worked well on My Name Is Nobody (1973), his visually stunning collaboration with Tonino Valerii, who had worked as assistant director on most of Leone's films and knew exactly what his producer wanted. But the chemistry was less successful when Leone invited Damiani to direct a quasi-sequel to that film.

This was a treatment mysteriously titled A Genius, Two Friends and an Idiot, written by Ernesto Gastaldi and Fulvio Morsella. Damiani worked with both men on the script, and shared the writing credit. Despite being a vehicle for the comic actor Terence Hill, the project seemed to have plenty going for it. The supporting cast included Patrick McGoohan, Miou-Miou and Klaus Kinski. Large portions were shot in Monument Valley, and on sets built for Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West (1968). Yet the film dragged in the cinema and floundered at the box office – so badly that Leone claimed he had nothing to do with it, and had never visited the set. Press photographs of Damiani and Leone, standing on the railroad tracks in Monument Valley, revealed otherwise.

Highly regarded as the director of one of the best Italian westerns of all time and simultaneously blamed for one of the worst of them, Damiani took it all in his stride. He remained a working director – mainly in Italian films and television – for three decades. As the actor Franco Nero said: "A producer could count on him. If a film was supposed to be shot in nine weeks, he could do it in eight. As an actor, you felt safe with him." Damiani shot his last film, a comedy about hitmen on holiday, at the age of 80.

• Damiano Damiani, film director and screenwriter, born 23 July 1922; died 7 March 2013"http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/...amiano-damiani
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Old 03-16-2013, 08:21 PM   #6
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"The Monkees"/"Welcome Back, Kotter" writer, Peter Meyerson, R.I.P.




"Peter Meyerson, who co-wrote the first episode of the wacky NBC series The Monkees and then developed for television the ABC comedy Welcome Back, Kotter, died March 11 of natural causes at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, Calif. He was 82.

With Robert Schlitt, Meyerson penned the initial installment of The Monkees that aired Sept. 12, 1966. He wrote on his own the memorable 1968 episode in which Monkees bandmember Michael Nesmith switches places with iconoclastic rocker Frank Zappa.

Meyerson wrote or co-wrote eight of the 58 episodes of the series — third-most of any scribe — which starred Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork and Nesmith as members of a Beatles-like band. The show, from Screen Gems, lasted two seasons.

Kotter, which ran on ABC from 1975-79, starred Gabe Kotter as a high school teacher who returns to his alma mater in Brooklyn to preside over a bunch or remedial high school students. Those obnoxious teens, nicknamed The Sweathogs, were played by John Travolta, Ron Palillo, Robert Hegyes, Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs and others.

“I came up with the idea of Epstein, a Puerto Rican Jew (the character played by Hegyes),” Meyerson told The Wall Street Journal in 1999. “I came up with that phrase, ‘Sweathogs.’ ”

Meyerson received 5 percent of the profits from the show after it wrapped, he told the newspaper, and years later attempted to sell his share of future profits in an online auction.

A native of the Bronx, Meyerson was credited as a writer with Kaplan and Alan Sacks on the Kotter pilot, one of the 24 episodes he penned for the show from Wolper Productions and The Komack Co. He also served as a supervising producer on nearly 30 episodes. (Kotter and Sacks are credited as the creators of Kotter.)

Meyerson’s other TV work included a regular gig writing for Captain Nice, a 1967 superhero show created by Buck Henry that starred William Daniels. He also penned episodes of That Girl, Accidental Family, The Partridge Family and The Bob Newhart Show.

Survivors include his sons Lucas, Jason and Benjamin."http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...-kotter-428737
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Old 03-16-2013, 08:24 PM   #7
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Classic TV SciFi character actor, Malachi Throne, R.I.P.


Malachi Throne's original voice performance as the Talosian Magistrate in the Star Trek pilot "The Cage"
In "Ark II" as Warlord Brack
In "Batman" episode "True or False Face" as False Face/Armored Truck Guard #2

"Malachi Throne, the veteran TV actor who played Robert Wagner's boss on It Takes a Thief and the enigmatic evildoer False-Face on Batman, died Wednesday in Los Angeles of lung cancer. He was 84.

Justified actor Jim Beaver reported Throne's death Thursday on his Facebook page. “My good friend Malachi Throne died last night. One of the finest actors and finest people I've been fortunate enough to know,” the entry said.

Throne provided the voice of the Talosian leader The Keeper for "The Cage," the pilot episode of Star Trek, and in 1966 played Commodore José Mendez in the only two-parter of the original series.

Earlier, he rejected Gene Roddenberry's offer to play Dr. Leonard McCoy on the series after Throne lobbied for the role of Spock. "There's an old saying among actors: 'Never be the third man through the door,' and I felt I would always be the third man in that role," he once said.

Throne also worked on Star-Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek New Voyages: Phase II. And with his distinctive deep voice, he narrated the original trailer for Star Wars (1977).

The action-adventure It Takes a Thief, inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief (1955), starring Cary Grant, ran on ABC from January 1968 to March 1970. It starred Wagner as sophisticated thief Alexander Mundy, who is freed from jail so he can steal for the U.S. government.

Throne's Noah Bain worked for the Secret Intelligence Agency and frequently threatened to return Mundy to prison if he didn't do what he was told.

Throne exited It Takes a Thief in the third season and was replaced by Edward Binns, reportedly upset when the series was to film in Italy and he was being asked to stay behind and give Wagner's character orders over the phone.

On ABC's Batman, Throne's face was never seen as he strapped on a bizarre plastic mask when he wasn't posing as Chief O'Hara, Commissioner Gordon and others as False-Face in 1966. In the series' traditional two-part format, he is mysteriously credited as "?" in the first part (but as Thone in the second).

"Everyone wanted to know who played False-Face. It was a two-part episode, so after the first week the papers were abuzz," he once said. "Eventually, I cooled down and let them put my name at the end of the second episode. It was the best press I ever got in my life."

Born Dec. 1, 1928, in New York City, Throne played Huckleberry Finn at age 10 in the New York Parks Department's production of Tom Sawyer. He worked in off-Broadway and Broadway productions before guest-starring on scores of TV shows, including Naked City, The Untouchables, 77 Sunset Strip, Ben Casey, The Defenders, The Fugitive, I Spy, The Big Valley, The Time Tunnel, Hogan's Heroes, Hawaii Five-O, What's Happening!, Babylon 5, Melrose Place and Avatar: The Last Airbender.

Throne was an active member of the Theatre West company in Los Angeles. He was scheduled to appear in The Fantasticks there this past fall but had to withdraw because of his fading health, publicist Philip Sokoloff said. His wife said Throne was cremated and there will be no services.

"Theatre West says goodbye to our friend and colleague Malachi Throne," said a message on the theater's home page."http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...k-thief-429009
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:02 AM   #8
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"Are You Being Served?" British Actor Frank Thornton, R.I.P.


"Are You Being Served?" episode "German Week," Season 3, Episode 6

"As a floorwalker in the faded department store Grace Brothers, Thornton’s Capt Peacock patrolled his beat with a quiet and courteous authority. As he surveyed his domain of menswear and ladies’ fashions with a sometimes hard-pressed hauteur, he appeared a beacon of fastidiousness in a vanishing, old-fashioned world.

The imperious Peacock countered with dignity and moral distance the whims and wheezes of his underlings, notably the mincing Mr (“I’m free!”) Humphries (John Inman), the minxy Miss Brahms (Wendy Richard) and the purple-rinsed Mrs Slocombe (Molly Sugden) endlessly fretting about her “*****”. In the face of insolence from insubordinates, Thornton could issue a gesture or a look — shooting his cuffs, holding his head more erectly, casting a withering glare or just lifting a censorious eyebrow — to betoken multiple nuances of well-mannered disapproval.

If, under the pressure of some departmental crisis, Peacock allowed his self-control to yield to temper, Thornton would simply look to the heavens as if hoping for divine intervention, jerk his head in disgust, and bestow on the disintegrating scene a simmering threat of unleashed wrath .

Thornton’s was a lonely kind of comedy, proceeding from character rather than situation, and thriving on restraint — another long-running television role was as the retired police officer Herbert “Truly” Truelove in Last of the Summer Wine (1997-2010). Yet neither this, nor his portrayal of Capt Peacock — a figure he revived on television in the 1990s in the less successful series, Grace and Favour, a rural spin-off with the same ensemble cast — suggested that Thornton was one of the stage’s most soundly-trained Shakespeareans with a career spanning more than half a century.

He was born Frank Thornton Ball at Dulwich on January 15 1921. Educated at Alleyn’s School, he worked as an insurance clerk before his love of theatre put paid to any notions of an orthodox career.

In 1940, on leaving Rada, he made his professional debut, aged 19, in Ireland at the Confraternity Hall at Thurles in Co Tipperary. He played the hearty, florid Brian Curtis in Terence Rattigan’s French Without Tears before touring plays round small towns and village halls in the Irish “fit-up” tradition.

A year later, back in London, he joined Donald Wolfit’s Shakespearean company during its first West End wartime season, playing Fenton and Bardolph in The Merry Wives of Windsor (Strand) and touring as Dewhurst in The Scarlet Pimpernel. As London endured the Blitz, his West End roles included Laertes in Hamlet and Lysander in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Strand). After his Mosca to Wolfit’s Volpone had been well received at the St James’s, John Gielgud engaged him for two small parts in his revival of Macbeth (Piccadilly, 1942); and he took over as Cpl Jones in the West End run of Rattigan’s Flare Path (Apollo, also 1942).

Enlisting in the RAF that November, Thornton trained as a navigator in Canada, returning in January 1945 to complete his operational training; but the war finished before he could join a squadron. In the summer of 1945 he joined the RAF Entertainment Unit and was discharged in 1947 in the rank of flying officer and joined Southsea rep.

He toured as Franzel in Ivor Novello’s romantic musical The Dancing Years in 1947-48, and as the hapless Gregory Throstle in Vernon Sylvaine’s farce One Wild Oat . After two short-lived West End musicals, he appeared as the Caliph in Hassan at the Dublin Theatre Festival and as Ludovico Nota in Pirandello’s Naked (Oxford Playhouse).

Back in London in the mid-1960s, he appeared in Charles Wood’s Meals on Wheels (Royal Court); a tour of The Little Hut; a spell as a QC in the Savoy whodunnit Alibi for a Judge; and in the musical The Young Visitors (Piccadilly, 1968) . In 1970 he gave a typically stolid cameo as Councillor Parker in JB Priestley’s Yorkshire comedy When We Are Married (Strand).

For two seasons running he was perfectly cast as the long-faced Eeyore in AA Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh (Phoenix, 1971 and 1972). In between his television work on Are You Being Served? he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company as Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night and as Duncan to Nicol Williamson’s Macbeth, first at Stratford-on-Avon and then the Aldwych (1974-75).

Thornton re-created the role of Capt Peacock on stage in Are You Being Served? for the Blackpool summer season of 1976. The film of the same name, released a year later, in which the staff of Grace Brothers decamped on holiday to the Costa Plonka, was every bit as dire as the plot.

After touring as Sir Justin Holbrook (opposite Donald Sinden) in the farce Shut Your Eyes and Think of England, Thornton continued in the role for a run at the Apollo, and in 1979 appeared in Alan Ayckbourn’s Bedroom Farce at Windsor and in Tom Stoppard’s Jumpers at Leatherhead.

In 1980 he turned to the French avant-garde in Ionesco’s The Chairs (Royal Exchange, Manchester) before an Australian tour of Alan Bennett’s Habeas Corpus, and as Malvolio in Twelfth Night at Newbury. One of his longest runs was as Sir John Tremayne in Me and My Girl, first at Leicester, then in London at the Adelphi (1984-86).

Thornton’s other television appearances included the comedy series It’s A Square World, The World of Beachcomber and HMS Paradise. He made more than 50 films, among them Crooks and Coronets (1968); Spike Milligan’s The Bed-Sitting Room (1969); No Sex Please We’re British (1973); The Three Musketeers (1973); Steptoe and Son (1974); The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones (1975); and Gosford Park (2001). On television he appeared in The Taming of the Shrew (1981), Great Expectations (1991), The Old Curiosity Shop (1995) and as the clerk of the court in All Rise For Julian Clary (1996).

His interests included music, photography and wildlife conservation.

Frank Thornton married, in 1945, the actress Beryl Evans, who survives him with their daughter."http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obit...-Thornton.html
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:51 AM   #9
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r.I.P Malachi Throne. very distinctive voice, it was also his work on the re mastered pilot episode of the Cage, The main Talosian "mastermind" well the deeper voice that popped through in the original sound mix

Like to know which episode he participated in for TNG?.

and Frank Thornton, used to love 'Are You Being Served' and 'last of The Summer wine'
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:27 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L-Rouge View Post
r.I.P Malachi Throne. very distinctive voice, it was also his work on the re mastered pilot episode of the Cage, The main Talosian "mastermind" well the deeper voice that popped through in the original sound mix

Like to know which episode he participated in for TNG?.

and Frank Thornton, used to love 'Are You Being Served' and 'last of The Summer wine'
He appeared in "Unification I & II" during the 5th Season.
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:02 PM   #11
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Henry Bromell, executive producer of ‘Homeland,’ dies at 65
Bromell's other TV credits included 'Northern Exposure,' 'Chicago Hope,' 'Rubicon' and 'Brotherhood.'


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...#ixzz2O7V9A3yu
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:31 PM   #12
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"Deadly Eyes"/"Fluke" & Horror writer James Herbert R.I.P.



"Rats" (aka "Deadly Eyes") (1982) Trailer
"Fluke" Trailer

"James Herbert, one of the UK's most popular novelists and writer of bestselling horror books including The Rats, The Fog and The Survivor, has died at his home in Sussex aged 69.

His publisher, Pan Macmillan, said Herbert, author of 23 novels published in 34 languages that sold more than 54m copies worldwide, died peacefully in his bed.

Tributes were led by Jeremy Trevathan, his editor for 10 years. He said: "Jim Herbert was one of the keystone authors in a genre that had its heyday in the 1970s and 1980s. It's a true testament to his writing and his enduring creativity that his books continued to be huge bestsellers right up until his death. He has the rare distinction that his novels were considered classics of the genre within his lifetime. His death marks the passing of one of the giants of popular fiction in the 20th century."

Novelist James Smythe, who writes about horror fiction for the Guardian, said: "James Herbert was one of the first adult writers – in both senses of the term – that I ever read. When I stopped reading my gateway teenage books and moved on to my dad's horror novels, he was one of the big three: him, Stephen King and Dean Koontz.

"He was the weirdest, the nastiest. The Fog and The Rats terrified me; Creed was spoken about in my school in almost mythological ways, being both horrifying and introducing us to sexual concepts we'd never contemplated before that point; and The Magic Cottage, when given to me aged 13 by an amazing English teacher, was one of the books that made me want to become a writer.

"The early books still retain an amazing power over me to this day, showing his skill as one of the greats of the horror fiction genre."

Herbert was born in London in 1943, the youngest son of East End market traders, and got his first work in advertising, becoming art director and head of the agency he joined.

At the age of 28 he began writing his first novel, a terrifying story of London being overrun by mutant, flesh-eating rats. When The Rats was finally published in 1974, the first print run of 100,000 copies sold out in three weeks.

The pattern was to be repeated time and again: he scared the living daylights out of readers with books such as The Dark, The Magic Cottage, Haunted and Creed.

Four of his novels – The Rats, The Survivor, Fluke and Haunted – were made into films while one of his later works, The Secret of Crickley Hall, became a three-part supernatural thriller for the BBC last year.

The paperback of his 23rd novel, Ash, was published last week.

In an interview last year Herbert said: "I hate violence and I didn't plan to write horror; it just poured out of me. The great thing is that you can write humour, romance or political thrillers under that genre."

Herbert, awarded an OBE in 2010, is survived by his wife, Eileen, and their three daughters."http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013...or-author-dies
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:18 AM   #13
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"Rambo"/ reboot pitchman Eli Richbourg R.I.P.

"Rambo reboot pitchman Eli Richbourg, 42, died in Paris of a brain aneurysm on Wednesday night, according to Deadline.

Richbourg was a frequent collaborator of Joel Schumacher’s as well as a writer and producer. His most recent claim to fame was that Millennium had hired him for the Rambo reboot based on an undisclosed pitch he sold to the company.

Deadline, citing a report from Richbourg’s representatives, noted the Vermont native had spent “nearly 20 years working at Schumacher’s side,” adding that he served “in positions varying from Executive Producer to Writer to Second Unit Director on a total of 13 Schumacher films.”

Richbourg got his start in the art department on Batman Forever, but was hired as Schumacher’s assistant shortly thereafter.

Other early credits included second unit director on 8MM and Tigerland, and associate producer on Flawless, Bad Company, Phone Booth, and Veronica Guerin.

Richbourg also executive produced Blood Creek and The Number 23 and in 2009, was hired as vice-president of film development at Ubisoft in an effort to bring games like Assassin’s Creed and Splinter Cell to the big screen.

As for the Rambo reboot, it appeared that Millennium was fully back behind the project thanks to Richbourg.

In a February 2013 report from MovieHole from the Berlin Film Festival, a UK correspondent for the website said the production company had resurrected posters depicting series star Sylvester Stallone in the role with the Rambo V tag printed across the bottom.

These were slightly tweaked variations that the company had promoted in 2010, but at that time, Stallone had revealed to Ain’t It Cool News he did not plan to revisit the character.

Stallone told AICN that “the folks behind those posters” said if he didn’t do it someone else would. “And [Stallone] seems fine with that,” the report stated.

Considering the obituary notice from Richbourg’s representatives at Principato-Young referred to Richbourg’s take as a reboot, it is unlikely Stallone would have returned. And with Richbourg gone, the uncertainty will likely continue.

Which of Richbourg’s films were your favorite? Would you still like to see Millennium push forward with the Rambo reboot?" http://www.inquisitr.com/583458/rambo-reboot-loses-pitchman-eli-richbourg-dead-at-42/#35wX7M6yCpYX5mDy.99
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Old 03-24-2013, 05:58 PM   #14
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BritishtTrumpeter who played on every James Bond Soundtrack, Derek Watkins, R.I.P.


"Skyfall" interview

"The musician, who has played with The Beatles, Elton John, Frank Sinatra and Eric Clapton, died on Friday at home in Claygate, near Esher, Surrey, following a lengthy illness.

Watkins was "widely considered to be the foremost British Big Band trumpet player ever to grace the stage", said Philip Biggs, the editor of the Brass Herald.

As well as playing on the soundtrack for every 007 film from Dr No to Skyfall, he also performed with the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

He was described by the great Dizzy Gillespie as "Mr Lead", said Mr Biggs.

Mr Biggs described him as "a fun loving musician who couldn't get enough of life, who loved his family" and had "no ego".

Watkins is survived by his wife Wendy and their children, Sean, Ellie and Sarah.

He was born into a brass band family and taught to play the cornet at the age of four by his father.

He then played in the band his father conducted – the Spring Gardens Brass Band in Reading, of which is grandfather was also conductor and a founder member.

Before turning professional he also played with his father's dance band.

His musical career also saw him perform with the BBC Big Band and prominent jazz musicians Johnny Dankworth, Maynard Ferguson and Benny Goodman." http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/9949927/James-Bond-trumpet-player-Derek-Watkins-dies.html
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Old 03-28-2013, 06:18 AM   #15
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Polish and "Schindler's List" actor Jerzy Nowak R.I.P.




"Jerzy Nowak, a great theater and film actor, died March 26 at a hospital in Warsaw - read at the National Old Theatre in Krakow. He was 89 years old.

The last film role Jerzy Nowak was the creation of the "raid" Martin Krzyształowicz. On the stage of the Old Theatre was the last time in the role of Singer Hirsch in the play, "I am a Jew from" The Wedding. "In this role over 20 years he played more than 630 times.

Watched the first performances in community theater founded by his father - in Bohorodczanach governor, a renowned lawyer and theater lover in one person. About his own acting career apparently decided after watching "The Wedding" in Bydgoszcz, the profession of teaching in the courses conducted at the Stary Theatre in Krakow.

He has performed in theaters in Katowice (1949-1955 Wyspiański Theatre), and Krakow (Old - 1955-1974 and T. them. Slovak - since 1974). Appeared on the screen in 1955 in "Podhale in the fire" by Jan Batory. He acted in films Wanda Jakubowska ("Meeting in the dark" - 1960, "The End of our world" - 1963), Witold Lesiewicz (among others. "Deserter" - 1958, "Year One" - 1960, "Unknown" - 1964) and Janusz Morgenstern ("Jowita" - 1967). Series fans remember him for his roles in the TV shows "black clouds" Konica Andrew, "a rate larger than life" (a role tailor Mariana Skowronek) and the "Polish road" Morgenstern. Usually played a secondary expressive, giving him the title of "Grandmaster of episodes."

In 1973, Jerzy Nowak played in Zucker directed by Andrzej Wajda adaptation of "The Promised Land". Year 1979 brought Osuch role in "Amator" Krzysztof Kieslowski and participation in the "chance" directed by Feliks Falk. In 1981 he participated in the implementation of Krzysztof Zanussi's film "from a far country." He also starred in "love stories" by Jerzy Stuhr.

Multilingualism was known actor: he played in German, Russian, English. The School of Theatre taught Jewish dialect. Impressed by Jerzy Nowak on the set of "Schindler's List" by Steven Spielberg, who expanded his role a few scenes.

In 2000, he starred in the Crispus form of "Quo Vadis" and Wesemira Kawalerowicz George in "The Witcher". Then she entrusted him with the role Mietek Agnieszka Holland in the image "Julie Walking Home". In 2002 Andrzej Wajda has not forgotten about him, the recruitment of him in his adaptation of "Revenge" as a bricklayer Michael Kafara. Two years later he played in the Polish-Hungarian production of "The Miracle in Cracow".

Jerzy Nowak has also been controversial hero awakening of the "existence" Martin Koszałka, which explained his decision to donate his body after death for research. It's also a film about the inevitability of impermanence, which at the same time, however, praise life.

In 2008, Smith starred in the "Bobcats" Michael Rosa, and two years later in the "hoax" Jack Koprowicz.

He was also the author of literary works performed on stage and the stage."http://film.onet.pl/wiadomosci/jerzy...ml#BoxSlotIIMT
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Old 03-28-2013, 06:19 AM   #16
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"Teacher's Pet" (1958)/"Friendly Fire" (1979) Writer/second AMPAS President Fay Kanin R.I.P.


"Teacher's Pet" Trailer

"Fay Kanin, an Oscar-nominated screenwriter for the 1958 Clark Gable-Doris Day comedy "Teacher's Pet" and former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Wednesday. She was 95.

In a writing career that spanned more than four decades, Kanin penned screenplays for movies such as the 1954 Elizabeth Taylor romantic drama "Rhapsody" and television specials such as "Tell Me Where It Hurts," for which she won two Emmy Awards in 1974. She won another Emmy in 1979 for producing "Friendly Fire," a critically acclaimed Carol Burnett TV movie based on the true story of an American soldier killed in the Vietnam War.

Kanin served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 1979 to 1983, and was its second female president after actress Bette Davis. Kanin also was a longtime chairperson of the National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress and served on the board of the American Film Institute.

She died of natural causes at her home in Santa Monica, said caretaker Monique West.

The Academy said in a statement that Kanin had been instrumental in expanding the organization's public programming and was committed to its preservation work.

"A tireless mentor and inspiration to countless filmmakers, Fay's passion for film continues to inspire us daily," the Academy said.

As a screenwriter who got her start in the early 1940s, Kanin was a pioneering figure in an industry then dominated by men. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, she and husband Michael Kanin, the late Oscar-winning screenwriter, were placed on a so-called gray list — a less formal and severe version of the anti-Communist Hollywood blacklist. The Kanins, who were friends with Communist Party members, were denied work for about two years in the early 1950s until director Charles Vidor asked them to write "Rhapsody."

In 1986, upon receiving an honor from the Genii Awards, which recognize the achievements of women working in the entertainment business, Kanin said that it was important to "choose projects you believe in, and fight whatever battles are necessary to get them realized.

"You can work with people you respect and forge relationships with people who mean something," she told attendees, according to a 1986 Los Angeles Times article.

Kanin often collaborated on scripts with her husband, who shared the Oscar for best original screenplay with Ring Lardner Jr. in 1942 for "Woman of the Year." The Kanins shared the best original screenplay Oscar nomination for "Teacher's Pet," which centers on an ornery newspaper editor played by Gable who falls for an idealistic journalism instructor played by Day.

Kanin told The Times in a 2001 interview that "Teacher's Pet" was originally written as a serious film, but she and her husband found no takers for the script. Rewritten by the couple as a comedy, the project sold to Paramount Pictures. When actors Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart were unavailable, the film's producers asked the Kanins about Gable.

"We said that happens to be the perfect casting," she said. "Nobody could do this better than Gable."

Born in New York to Bessie and David Mitchell on May 9, 1917, Kanin grew up in Elmira, N.Y., where she won the New York State Spelling Championship as a teenager. She went on to attend Elmira College, and completed her course work at USC after the Mitchell family moved to Los Angeles, according to "Encyclopaedia Judaica."

After graduating from USC in the late 1930s, Kanin decided to pursue a career in Hollywood with the help of an uncle who had contacts in show business. She got a job as a reader in RKO's story department.

While there, Kanin met her future husband, then a writer in the company's B movie unit. The Kanins married in 1940 and had two sons, Joel and Josh. Joel died of lung cancer in 1958 at age 13.

The couple formed half of a formidable Hollywood family. Michael Kanin's younger brother Garson Kanin was a screenwriter and his wife Ruth Gordon won the Oscar for best supporting actress for her turn in "Rosemary's Baby." In 2001, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art put on a two-week film festival called "The Kanins — A Remarkable Family," that honored the work of the foursome.

Kanin's writing credits also include the 1949 Broadway comedy "Goodbye, My Fancy," the 1959 Broadway adaptation of "Rashomon" and other TV movies such as "Heartsounds" and "Hustling."

Kanin's husband died in 1993. She is survived by her son Josh, two grandchildren and two step-grandchildren."http://www.latimes.com/news/obituari...0,874980.story
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:50 PM   #17
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Spanish (Argentina) animation director & cartoonist Manuel Garcia Ferre R.I.P.


from his most famous animated TV series "Hijitus"

"Animation director and cartoonist Manuel García Ferré died today at the age of 83 during a heart surgery, in a Buenos Aires hospital.

Born in Almería, Spain, he lived in Argentina since 1947. In 1964 he created Anteojito, a famous children's magazine.

As director of his own animation studio, García Ferré created numerous animated TV series and films. The most influential of these was Hijitus, aired between 1967 and 1974 on Channel 13.

The first animated television series in Argentina, Hijitus was also aired elsewhere in the region and became the most successful television series of its kind in Latin America.

García Ferré was declared an Illustrious Citizen of Buenos Aires by the City Legislature in 2009.

Calculín, El Profesor Neurus, Manuelita, Larguirucho and Trapito were also famous characters he created throughout his career."http://www.buenosairesherald.com/art...err%C3%A9-dies
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Old 03-29-2013, 09:07 PM   #18
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"The Simpsons"/"Thor" writer Don Payne dies at 48




"Don Payne, an award-winning writer and producer of "The Simpsons" and screenwriter of the 2011 blockbuster "Thor" as well as "My Super Ex-Girlfriend" and "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer," died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles, said his friend and former writing partner John Frink. He was 48 and had bone cancer.

Payne was most recently a consulting producer on "The Simpsons," Fox's long-running animated series. Two episodes he wrote are in production and will air in the fall: "Labor Pains" and the Christmas installment, "White Christmas Blues."

Payne won four Emmys for his work on the series and also received the Writers Guild of America's Paul Selvin Award in 2005 for the "Fraudcast News" episode.

He made the transition to screenwriting with "My Super Ex-Girlfriend," the 2006 comedy starring Uma Thurman and Luke Wilson about a bachelor who discovers his girlfriend is a superhero.

"Much to my wife's chagrin, I am a superhero geek," Payne told The Times that year. "Definitely growing up I was into comics and became a comedy writer as an adult, so I put the two things together."

Born May 5, 1964, in Wilmington, N.C., Payne received his bachelor's degree in film and television and a master's in screenwriting from UCLA. He intended to write movies until he began collaborating with Frink out of college. "I wanted to do films, he wanted to do television," Payne told The Times in the 2006 interview.

They decided to work in whatever medium they first got a job. So they ended up writing for "Hope & Gloria," "The Brian Benben Show" and other sitcoms. The two joined the writing staff of "The Simpsons" in 1998 and became part of the producing team in 2000. Among the nine episodes they wrote together were "Insane Clown Puppy," "The Bart Wants What It Wants" and "Old Yeller-Belly."

Payne is survived by his wife, Julie; their sons, Nathaniel and Joshua; their daughter, Lila; his mother, Barbara Payne; a brother, John Payne, and a sister, Suzanne Fanning.

A memorial service is planned for 1 p.m. Friday at Hillside Memorial Park, 6001 W. Centinela Ave., Los Angeles."http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar...payne-20130328
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Old 03-31-2013, 10:29 PM   #19
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"Class of Nuke 'Em High Part II"/"The Net" actress and 1962 Playmate of the Year Christa Speck Krofft R.I.P.





"Playboy magazine's 1962 'Playmate of the Year,' Christa Speck Krofft, has died of natural causes at the age of 70.

Family spokesman Christoph Buerger said she died on March 22, at home.

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner tweeted, ‘I'm saddened by the death of dear friend 1962 PMOY Christa Speck.’

The dark-haired Speck, a native of Danzig, Germany, was working as a bank secretary at Bank of America when she was discovered by Playboy.

Then, she became what her family calls ‘one of the most celebrated Playmates of her time.’

After Playboy named her ‘Playmate of the Month’ for September 1961, Speck worked as a Playboy Bunny in the Chicago club, ‘lived in Hefner's famed Playboy Mansion, and was featured in all the magazine's Sixties pictorials about life at Hef's place,’ the spokesman said.

Speck was selected by Playboy editors and readers as one of their 10 favorite Playmates from the magazine’s first decade.

Her centerfold is seen in the 1978 comedy classic Animal House, which is set in 1962.

Speck married noted children's television producer Marty Krofft, of H.R. Pufnstuf and Land of the Lost fame, in September 1965.

Other survivors include their daughters Deanna, Kristina and Kendra and their grandchildren Taylor, Karson, Griffin, Georgia and Drake.

‘Mom had an uncanny ability to make everyone smile and touched so many people with her unique sense of humor,' read a statement attributed to the family.

'It's rare to find a human being that holds no judgment and sees the good in everyone. That was our mom. We will miss her terribly.’" http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2301775/Christa-Speck-Krofft-Woman-went-Bank-America-secretary-Playboy-Playmate-Year-dies.html#ixzz2P9rhmauZ
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Old 04-03-2013, 01:51 AM   #20
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Muppets collaborator and wife of Jim Henson, Jane Henson, R.I.P.



"Jane Henson, who with her future husband and fellow puppeteer Jim Henson was instrumental in bringing the Muppets to life in the 1950s on a TV station in Washington, D.C., died Tuesday at her home in Greenwich, Conn., after a long battle with cancer. She was 78.

Jane met Jim in a puppetry class in 1954 when she was a fine arts education major at the University of Maryland. While still an undergraduate, Jim was offered a job on NBC affiliate WRC-TV in Washington, and he asked Jane to join him as a co-performer and creator.

Their television show, the five-minute Sam and Friends, aired before the national news program The Huntley-Brinkley Report and then again before The Tonight Show Starring Steve Allen on the D.C. station. Their characters were forerunners of the Muppets, and the show included a prototype of the Hensons' most famous puppet, Kermit the Frog.

The puppets' first national television guest appearance would come on Allen’s Tonight Show, and soon they were making guest appearances on the top variety shows of the day on their way to eventual international acclaim.

The couple married in May 1959 and legally separated in 1986. Jim died in 1990. Two years later, Jane funded and founded the Jim Henson Legacy to conserve, preserve and present the artistic contribution of her late husband. In 2001, she created the Jane Henson Foundation for philanthropic work.

After the couple split, she continued her association with the Jim Henson Co. and actively participated in the company as it became a global family entertainment organization, collaborating with Jim on projects that included the traveling museum exhibit "The Art of the Muppets" as well as "The Muppet Show on Tour" and "Sesame Street Live" arena shows.

Known for her keen eye for spotting puppeteer talent, Jane also became the point of entry to the company for many top puppeteers.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Jane also served on the board of the Jim Henson Foundation, founded in 1982 to promote and develop the art of puppetry (now headed by their daughter, Cheryl). Each year, the foundation introduces thousands of adults and families to puppetry through grant-making and public awareness efforts. Since its inception, the foundation has awarded more than 675 grants to more than 300 American puppet artists for the creation and development of new work.

During her career, Jane also served as an assistant art teacher at the Mead School for Human Development in Greenwich and co-founded the National Puppetry Conference at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn.

In addition to Cheryl, survivors include daughters Lisa and Heather and sons Brian and John. A memorial mass is planned for next week.

Donations may be sent in memory of Jane Henson to the Center for Puppetry Arts, the Jim Henson Foundation for the support of puppetry or the Puppetry Conference at the Eugene O'Neill Memorial Theater Center."http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...on-dies-432527
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