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Old 04-03-2013, 01:52 AM   #21
rkolinski rkolinski is offline
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"Oasis of the Zombies"/"Dracula, Prisoner of Frankenstein" Director Jesus Franco R.I.P.


from "Vampyros Lesbos"
from "Count Dracula"

"A legendary figure in international genre cinema is gone. Jesus Franco, a Spanish writer and director who made close to two hundred films in a career that spanned seven decades, died in Malaga, Spain on Tuesday at the age of 82, due to complications from a stroke.

Franco's twin specialties were horror and eroticism, and he often mixed the two in cult favorites like "Succubus," "She Killed In Ecstasy," "A Virgin Among The Living Dead," "Vampyros Lesbos," and "Daughter of Dracula."

Franco was born Jesus Franco Manera in Madrid in 1930. Franco's first love was music, and he studied piano at the Real Conservatorio de Madrid, but he later developed a passion for cinema and was a student at the Instituto de Investigaciones y Experiencias Cinematograicas in Spain as well as the L'Institut des Hautes Etudes Cinematographiques in France. As he made his way into the Spanish film industry, Franco was an assistant to Orson Welles for the production of the unreleased "Don Quixote" in the late 1950s and early '60s (Franco would later help assemble Welles' footage into a feature released in 1992), and went on to direct his first feature in 1959, "Tenemos 18 Anos" (aka "We Are 18 Years Old").

Franco enjoyed his first international success in 1962 with "Gritos en la Noche," released in America as "The Awful Dr. Orlof." The story of a mad surgeon who uses the flesh of kidnapped women to restore the beauty of his disfigured daughter, it was the first of several films that Franco would make focusing on the Orlof character, and its success not only launched Franco's prolific directorial career but helped make Spain a hub for European horror filmmaking in the 1960s and '70s. Franco's early career was an uphill battle, due to strict government censorship of sex and violence, but the success of Franco's films helped ease local restrictions on content, and fans of European genre fare soon developed a taste for Franco's glossy mixture of blood and sex.

Franco had a reputation for being able to work fast on a modest budget, and he could knock out films at an impressive rate - he released eight features in 1970, nine in 1972, and twelve in 1973. He also used a variety of names for his work, including Jesus Franco, Jess Franco, Clifford Brown, Chuck Evans, David Khune, and Pablo Villa. But despite the relentless pace, his films had a polished visual style and he knew how to deliver soft-core eroticism with a kinky touch in "Venus In Furs," "Marquis de Sade's Justine," and "Eugenie, The Story of Her Journey into Perversion" as well as more traditional horror fare such as "Count Dracula" (starring Christopher Lee and Klaus Kinski) and "Dracula vs. Frankenstein" and the women-in-prison picture "99 Women."

By the mid-1970s, interest in Franco's horror films began to wane, and he devoted more of his time to sex pictures, many starring his muse (and later spouse) Lina Romay. By the 1980s, Franco was also directing hard-core porn, but as a new generation was rediscovering classic European horror, Franco returned to the genre with 1988's "Faceless," starring Helmut Berger and Telly Savalas. Through the rest of his career, Franco moved back and forth between sex and horror films, an remained active into his last months, having recently completed "Al Pereira vs. The Alligator Ladies.""http://movies.yahoo.com/blogs/movie-...222342685.html
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Old 04-04-2013, 10:17 PM   #22
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Oscar-winning screenwriter of "A Room with a View"/"Howards End," Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, R.I.P.


"The Remains of the Day" Trailer

"Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, the German-born screenwriter and novelist who, as the writing member of the Merchant Ivory filmmaking team, won two Academy Awards for adaptations of genteel, class-conscious E. M. Forster novels, died on Wednesday at her home in Manhattan. She was 85.

James Ivory, the director with whom she collaborated, said the cause was complications of a pulmonary condition.

Mrs. Jhabvala (pronounced JOB-vahla) was already well established as an author when she began her screenwriting career with the producer Ismail Merchant and Mr. Ivory. Her 1975 novel, “Heat and Dust,” about an Englishwoman exploring a family scandal in India, received the Man Booker Prize, Britain’s highest literary honor. She wrote the screenplay for the Merchant Ivory version in 1983 as well.

Over four decades, beginning in 1963, Mrs. Jhabvala made 22 films with Mr. Merchant and Mr. Ivory, all examining culture in one way or another, often one that has vanished. Their first film to attract wide attention was “The Europeans” (1979), based on a Henry James novel set in mid-19th-century New England. Their successful “Room With a View” (1986), based on Forster’s novel about a sheltered young Englishwoman who has a life-changing experience on holiday in Italy, brought Mrs. Jhabvala the Oscar for best adapted screenplay.

History repeated itself when she won the same award for Merchant Ivory’s “Howards End” (1992), from a Forster book in which shifting Edwardian social classes cross paths with sometimes cruel results. The team’s collaborations — lush and literate, often adapted from classic novels — became something of a brand. Visually, a Merchant Ivory film promised “period-perfect costumes and settings” (as The Los Angeles Times wrote); “rich production values and an exquisite attention to detail” (The Minneapolis Star Tribune); or simply “taste” (The Chicago Tribune).

The casts were top-shelf and largely British, laden with stars like Maggie Smith, Anthony Hopkins, Emma Thompson, Daniel Day-Lewis, Helena Bonham Carter and Vanessa Redgrave. For “Mr. & Mrs. Bridge” (1990), based on the Evan S. Connell novels, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, spouses in real life, were recruited for the title roles.

But Mrs. Jhabvala’s writing was essential. She contributed sophisticated dialogue and a sharp eye for the nuances of class and ethnicity, Stephen Holden wrote in The New York Times. He also echoed a frequent complaint about Merchant Ivory productions, however, finding in them an “antique-shop sensibility and Anglo-European snob appeal.”

Mr. Merchant, who died in 2005, was Indian, and Mr. Ivory is American, but Mrs. Jhabvala brought a combination of cultural backgrounds to their film collaborations, which also included “The Remains of the Day” (1993), based on Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel, and adaptations of two more Henry James novels, “The Golden Bowl” (2000) and “The Bostonians” (1984).

Ruth Prawer was born on May 7, 1927, in Cologne, Germany, the daughter of Marcus Prawer, a Jewish lawyer who had immigrated there from Poland, and the former Eleanora Cohn. The family fled Hitler in 1939, when Ruth was 12. Unable to acquire visas for the United States, they settled in London instead. In 1948 Marcus Prawer committed suicide, having established that the entire family he had left behind in Poland had died in Nazi camps.

Ruth studied English literature at Queen Mary College, University of London, and received her degree in 1951. That year she married Cyrus Jhabvala, an Indian architect, and moved with him to Delhi, where she spent the next quarter-century as a privileged, somewhat reclusive housewife raising three daughters and writing novels about the new culture in which she found herself. Many readers assumed she was Indian.

After she wrote her first book, about a young Indian woman from a good family who falls in love with the wrong man, she sent the manuscript to her mother, who circulated it to British publishers. It was published there in 1955 as “To Whom She Will” and in the United States the next year as “Amrita.” It was followed by “The Nature of Passion” (1956) and “Esmond in India” (1957).

Once Mrs. Jhabvala had an American agent, her short stories began appearing in The New Yorker. Critics praised her satiric voice and compared her to Jane Austen, among others.

She continued to write fiction long after her film career had made her famous, shifting her focus gradually to the immigrant experience and European exiles in America. Her 12th and most recent novel, “My Nine Lives” (2004), posited several alternative paths her life might have taken, in New York, London, Delhi and elsewhere.

Her last short-story collection, “A Lovesong for India,” was published in 2012, and her last story for The New Yorker appeared in its March 25 issue. The story, “The Judge’s Will,” tells of a long-married woman in Delhi dealing with the news, and presence, of her husband’s longtime mistress.

It was her fiction that had brought Mr. Merchant and Mr. Ivory to her door. In the early 1960s, when the two men had made only a handful of films together, they approached Mrs. Jhabvala to write a screenplay based on her novel “The Householder,” about the trials of a young Indian husband. The film, made in India in black and white, was released in the United States in 1963. She shared writing credit with Mr. Ivory for a few of the team’s early films, including “Shakespeare Wallah” (1965), “The Guru” (1969) and “Bombay Talkie” (1970).

In the 1970s Mrs. Jhabvala moved to New York, where, as she wrote in her 1979 essay “Disinheritance,” she felt a connection to her early years.

“I met the people I went to school with in Cologne, with exactly the same background as my own, same heritage, same parentage,” she wrote. “Now here they were living in New York, as Americans, in old West Side apartments.”

Her marriage endured, with Mrs. Jhabvala spending several months a year in India and her husband paying her long visits in New York until he retired and they were able to reunite full time.

The last film the three Merchant Ivory principals made together was “Le Divorce” (2003), a contemporary story about Americans in Paris based on Diane Johnson’s novel. After Mr. Merchant’s death, Mrs. Jhabvala and Mr. Ivory worked together on “The City of Your Final Destination” (2009), another literary adaptation, of the Peter Cameron novel, set on an estate in Uruguay inhabited by Europeans, played by Laura Linney and Mr. Hopkins.

Holding dual British and American citizenship, she was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire, for her service to literature, in 1998.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by her daughters, Renana Jhabvala, Firoza Jhabvala and Ava Jhabvala Wood; and six grandchildren.

In the end, Mrs. Jhabvala lived in New York longer than in any other place, but that didn’t mean she saw the city as home.

“Once a refugee, always a refugee,” she told The Guardian in 2005. “I can’t ever remember not being all right wherever I was, but you don’t give your whole allegiance to a place or want to be entirely identified with the society you’re living in.”

Daniel E. Slotnik contributed reporting.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: April 3, 2013

An earlier version of this article incorrectly credited Ruth Prawer Jhabvala as a screenwriter on “Maurice”; Kit Heskit-Harvey collaborated with the director James Ivory as screenwriters for that 1987 film, which was adapted from the E. M. Forster novel. It also referred incorrectly to school where she studied English literature. It is Queen Mary College, University of London, not St. Mary College."http://www-nc.nytimes.com/2013/04/04...nted=all&_r=6&
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Old 04-05-2013, 12:35 PM   #23
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87-year old Besedka Johnson dies after fulfilling her dream of acting in her first and only film - R.I.P.


"Starlet" Trailer

"Besedka Johnson, who co-starred in Sean Baker’s Starlet in her first and only film role, died today in Los Angeles. She was 87. Johnson spent most of her life in LA as an aspiring actress but nabbed her first feature role as Starlet‘s Sadie at the age of 85 after being spotted by producer Shih-Ching Tsou at the YWCA in West Hollywood. “She texted me, ‘I think we found our Sadie,’” Baker told Movablefest.com. Johnson received a special jury prize at SXSW for the role and also received the Robert Altman Award for Best Ensemble Cast at the 2013 Independent Spirit Awards. “Besedka Johnson was one of the most inspirational, life-affirming and kind-hearted people I’ve ever met, said Baker in a statement. “She celebrated life on a daily basis and we are so lucky to have spent time and celebrated with her. My only wish is that she was discovered years ago and we would have decades of film and television that had captured her incredible talent. Besedka will be missed”."http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/r-i-p-besedka-johnson/
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Old 04-08-2013, 04:38 AM   #24
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Award-winning American documentary filmmkaker Les Blank, R.I.P.


"Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe"
"Burden of Dreams" Trailer

"Filmmaker Les Blank, whose documentaries about blues and jazz musicians and music of the South were widely acclaimed, died April 7 at his home in Berkeley, Calif. He was 77; the cause of death was bladder cancer.

Beginning in 1965 with a short film on Dizzy Gillespie, Blank set a new standard for creating intimate and revealing portraits of musicians and music-based cultures. He made "The Blues According to Lightnin' Hopkins" in 1968, "Hot Pepper" about zydeco legend Clifton Chenier in 1973 and "Sprout Wings and Fly" about the the Appalachian fiddler Tommy Jarrell in 1983.

"J'ai été au bal" ventured into Cajun country and "Chulas Fronteras" traveled back and forth across the Texas-Mexico border with norteno musicians; he also made a 31-minute film with Huey Lewis and the News on the making of their video for "Stuck With You." "In Heaven There is No Beer," which won a special jury prize at the 1985 Sundance Film festival, he explored the world of polka.

Besides music, Blank also focused on food and drink in films such as “Garlic is as Good as 10 Mothers,” "All in This Tea" and "Yum Yum Yum!," a half-hour film about Cajun and Creole food.

Blank received lifetime achievement awards from the American Film Institute and the International Documentary Association and given the honorary Maverick Award at the Woodstock Film Festival in 2000.

Blank Jr. was born Nov. 27, 1935, in Tampa, Fla., and he attended Tulane University in New Orleans, where he majored in English. After seeing Ingmar Bergman's "The Seventh Seal," he began to study acting and playwriting before going to film school at the University of Southern California. His on-the-job training was in industrial and educational films and he opened a production company, Flower Films, in 1967.

Blank is survived by his sons Harrod and Beau, a daughter, Ferris Robinson, and three grandchildren."http://www.billboard.com/biz/article...ian-dead-at-77
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Old 04-08-2013, 04:26 PM   #25
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"Vera Cruz"/"Ave Maria" and Spanish actress Sara Montiel, R.I.P.



Sara Montiel and Mario Lanza in "Ave Maria" (1956)
Opening credits of "Vera Cruz"

"Sara Montiel, the first Spanish actress to make it in Hollywood and best known for her roles in international blockbusters such as “Vera Cruz”, died at home in Madrid on Monday aged 85, her family said.

One of Spain’s most loved actresses, Montiel made her on-screen debut in her mid-teens after winning a beauty contest whose prize was a film role in “Te quiero para mi”. This lead to a three-decade long movie career where she featured in nearly 50 films.

Born to a farmer and a beautician as Maria Antonia Abad Fernandez in the central Spanish village of Campo de Criptana in 1928, Montiel was known for her great natural beauty and starred in more than 14 films between 1950 and 1954.

She rose to international fame after starring alongside Gary Cooper and Burt Lancaster in the 1954 western “Vera Cruz”, and enjoyed a near mega-star status in both her homeland and Europe after her part in the “El ultimo cuple” in 1957.

In an interview with Spanish radio Onda Cero in March, she talked about her life, reminiscing about the many Hollywood encounters her career had blessed her with, including that with Marlon Brando in 1951.

“I was an idiot. I didn’t pay attention to him. He was filming ‘Guys and Dolls’ with Frank Sinatra and I spent an afternoon chatting with him.

“I didn’t get to know Frank Sinatra that day because he wasn’t working,” she said, adding she did however get to know Sinatra at a later stage.

She also recounted the time when, one morning, she stumbled upon Greta Garbo in her garden.

“She was in my home. I had woken up around noon, because I was still living my life like a Spaniard” and rising late, she said.

“I went out into the garden. My husband was there playing tennis with a woman. They were just finishing playing and came over to me. My husband said to me: ‘Antonia, look, I want you to meet Greta Garbo.’ I almost fainted.”

Montiel was married four times in her life, including to the late Spanish industrial magnate Pepe Tous, with whom she adopted two children, Thais and Zeus. Tous died in 1992.

Also a talented singer, Montiel, who once described herself as “very calm, very modest”, dedicated herself to her music career after retiring from the film industry in 1975."http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/04/0...-montiel-dies/
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Old 04-09-2013, 04:54 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkolinski View Post
BritishtTrumpeter who played on every James Bond Soundtrack, Derek Watkins, R.I.P.


"Skyfall" interview
007: SKYFALL - ÂM NHáº*C TRONG PHIM - YouTube

"The musician, who has played with The Beatles, Elton John, Frank Sinatra and Eric Clapton, died on Friday at home in Claygate, near Esher, Surrey, following a lengthy illness.

Watkins was "widely considered to be the foremost British Big Band trumpet player ever to grace the stage", said Philip Biggs, the editor of the Brass Herald.

As well as playing on the soundtrack for every 007 film from Dr No to Skyfall, he also performed with the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

He was described by the great Dizzy Gillespie as "Mr Lead", said Mr Biggs.

Mr Biggs described him as "a fun loving musician who couldn't get enough of life, who loved his family" and had "no ego".

Watkins is survived by his wife Wendy and their children, Sean, Ellie and Sarah.

He was born into a brass band family and taught to play the cornet at the age of four by his father.

He then played in the band his father conducted – the Spring Gardens Brass Band in Reading, of which is grandfather was also conductor and a founder member.

Before turning professional he also played with his father's dance band.

His musical career also saw him perform with the BBC Big Band and prominent jazz musicians Johnny Dankworth, Maynard Ferguson and Benny Goodman." http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/9949927/James-Bond-trumpet-player-Derek-Watkins-dies.html
he was also on this LP!
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:49 PM   #27
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RIP Richard Brooker, the first actor to wear the hockey mask as Jason.

He was only 58.

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Old 04-09-2013, 06:11 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Watson View Post
RIP Richard Brooker, the first actor to wear the hockey mask as Jason.

He was only 58.

You beat me to it and thanks for posting!

"Friday the 13th Part III" Actor and "Deathstalker" Stuntman Richard Brooker, R.I.P.



"Extremely sad news has hit the internet regarding one of the finest actors to ever play the horror mega-icon Jason Voorhees. It's with a heavy heart that we have to say goodbye to Friday the 13th Part 3's Richard Brooker.

The news started spreading like wildfire across Facebook moments ago, and we have confirmed with Brooker's management that it is indeed true. Richard was born in 1954 and was taken from us at an all too young age.

Aside from being the very first actor to ever officially don the infamous hockey mask as Jason, Brooker also appeared in James Sbardellati's sword and sandal flick Deathstalker and many horror documentaries such as Never Sleep Again, His Name Was Jason, and the upcoming Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th.

Richard was also a staple on the convention scene and, as anyone who has met him can easily attest, one hell of a nice guy. He will be severely missed by fans and his many friends the world over.

Thanks for the memories, sir. Godspeed."http://www.dreadcentral.com/news/654...ichard-brooker

Last edited by rkolinski; 04-11-2013 at 12:34 PM. Reason: correct url
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Old 04-11-2013, 12:33 PM   #29
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"300"/"The Day After Tomorrow" actor, director, author, and magician Greg Kramer, R.I.P.



"Canadian playwright Greg Kramer has died. The 51-year-old renaissance man (he was an actor, director, songwriter, and magician, according to the Globe and Mail) passed away on Monday, the day before his most high-profile play yet was set to start rehearsals.

Kramer was reportedly discovered at his apartment in Montreal after he failed to show up to rehearsals for "Sherlock Holmes," starring local actor Jay Baruchel in the titular role. Kramer was set to play Inspector Lestrade and rehearsals were shut down the day he was found.

"RIP Greg Kramer," tweeted Baruchel on Tuesday. "You will be missed and I will do my best to pay tribute to your words and the wonderful characters you put on the page."

Montreal police have reportedly ruled out foul play -- Kramer was HIV positive, had already fought cancer twice and had had one lung removed. He worked until the very end.

"The day he passed away, he e-mailed us a revised draft of the script,” said Paul Flicker, artistic producer at Montreal's Segal Centre for Performing Arts, where Kramer had directed before.

Baruchel and the play's director, Andrew Shraver, reportedly resumed rehearsals on Tuesday, though the role of Lestrade has yet to be recast. “I don’t want to sound trite, but I think at this point the best thing we can do for him is to do the best we can with his show,” Flicker told the Globe.

A self-described "Canadian by choice," Kramer moved to Vancouver in 1981 from the U.K., where he was born. “[Funding for] the [Incubus Theatre] company I was with got axed completely after being in existence for 13 years, so I went to Vancouver,” he told the Montreal Gazette last year.

He moved to Toronto seven years later, then finally settled in Montreal in 1999 (though his website claims he was recently based in Ottawa as well) all the while juggling his careers in acting, directing and writing. He wrote three novels as well as a collection of short stories, "Hogtown Bonbons," based on a column he had in Xtra.

An actor with 29 roles under his belt, Kramer's last role was as "Mississippi Gene" in "On the Road" opposite Kristen Stewart. Prior to that, he was the voice of Nemo in the "Arthur" cartoons from 1999 to 2010 and also starred in the series "John Woo's Once a Thief" (as cleaner Mr. Murphy) and Screed in "Forever Knight." He also had small roles in "I'm Not There," "300" and "The Day After Tomorrow."

In 2008, Kramer won a Best Director MECCA award (Montreal English Critics Circle Awards) for directing "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." Two years later he worked as a sleight of hand consultant on the Stratford Festival production of "The Tempest," starring Christopher Plummer.

“Plummer is incredible – an unbelievable professional,” Kramer said last year, adding, “But it wasn’t intimidating working with him, he was really friendly and very open. Given his age and how well he has kept himself, he is an inspiration.”

The same can be said for Kramer himself."http://ca.omg.yahoo.com/blogs/north-...163340686.html
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:31 PM   #30
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American Prima ballerina who appeared in "Million Dollar Mermaid," Maria Tallchief, R.I.P.


performing 'The Dying Swan' in the 1952 "Million Dollar Mermaid"

"Maria Tallchief, a daughter of an Oklahoma oil family who grew up on an Indian reservation, found her way to New York and became one of the most brilliant American ballerinas of the 20th century, died on Thursday in Chicago. She was 88.

Her daughter, the poet Elise Paschen, confirmed the death. Ms. Tallchief lived in Chicago.

A former wife and muse of the choreographer George Balanchine, Ms. Tallchief achieved renown with Balanchine’s New York City Ballet, dazzling audiences with her speed, energy and fire. Indeed, the part that catapulted her to acclaim, in 1949, was the title role in the company’s version of Stravinsky’s “Firebird,” one of many that Balanchine created for her.

The choreographer Jacques d’Amboise, who was a 15-year-old corps dancer in Balanchine’s “Firebird” before becoming one of City Ballet’s stars, compared Ms. Tallchief to two of the century’s greatest ballerinas: Galina Ulanova of the Soviet Union and Margot Fonteyn of Britain.

“When you thought of Russian ballet, it was Ulanova,” he said an interview on Friday. “With English ballet, it was Fonteyn. For American ballet, it was Tallchief. She was grand in the grandest way.”

A daughter of an Osage Indian father and a Scottish-Irish mother, Ms. Tallchief left Oklahoma at an early age, but she was long associated with the state nevertheless. She was one of five dancers of Indian heritage, all born at roughly the same time, who came to be called the Oklahoma Indian ballerinas: the others included her younger sister, Marjorie Tallchief, as well as Rosella Hightower, Moscelyne Larkin and Yvonne Chouteau.

Growing up at a time when many American dancers adopted Russian stage names, Ms. Tallchief, proud of her Indian heritage, refused to do so, even though friends told her that it would be easy to transform Tallchief into Tallchieva.

She was born Elizabeth Marie Tall Chief on Jan. 24, 1925 in a small hospital in Fairfax, Okla. Her father, Alexander Joseph Tall Chief, was a 6-foot-2 full-blooded Osage Indian whom his daughters idolized and women found strikingly handsome, Ms. Tallchief later wrote. (She and her sister joined their surnames when they began dancing professionally.)

Her mother, the former Ruth Porter, met Mr. Tall Chief, a widower, while visiting her sister, who was a cook and housekeeper for Mr. Tall Chief’s mother.

“When Daddy was a boy, oil was discovered on Osage land, and overnight the tribe became rich,” Ms. Tallchief recounted in “Maria Tallchief: America’s Prima Ballerina,” her 1997 autobiography written with Larry Kaplan. “As a young girl growing up on the Osage reservation in Fairfax, Okla., I felt my father owned the town. He had property everywhere. The local movie theater on Main Street, and the pool hall opposite, belonged to him. Our 10-room, terracotta-brick house stood high on a hill overlooking the reservation.”

She had her first ballet lessons in Colorado Springs, where the family had a summer home. She also studied piano and, blessed with perfect pitch, contemplated becoming a concert pianist.

But dance occupied her attention after the family, feeling confined in Oklahoma, moved to Los Angeles when she was 8. The day they arrived, her mother took her daughters into a drugstore for a snack at the soda fountain. While waiting for their order, Mrs. Tall Chief chatted with a druggist and asked him if he knew of a good dancing teacher. He recommended Ernest Belcher.

As Ms. Tallchief recalled in her memoir, “An anonymous man in an unfamiliar town decided our fate with those few words.”

Mr. Belcher, the father of the television and film star Marge Champion, was an excellent teacher, and Ms. Tallchief soon realized that her training in Oklahoma had been potentially ruinous to her limbs. At 12 she started studies with Bronislava Nijinska, a former choreographer for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, who had opened a studio in Los Angeles.

Nijinska, a formidable pedagogue, gave Ms. Tallchief special encouragement. But she also had classes with other distinguished teachers who passed through Los Angeles. One, Tatiana Riabouchinska, became her chaperon on a trip to New York City, which, since the outbreak of World War II, had become the base of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, a leading touring company. She joined the troupe in 1942.

Nijinska, one of its choreographers, cast her in some of her ballets. But Ms. Tallchief also danced in Agnes de Mille’s “Rodeo,"a pioneering example of balletic Americana. It was de Mille who suggested that Elizabeth Marie make Maria Tallchief her professional name. Her sister, who survives her, went on to achieve fame mostly in Europe.

In the summer of 1944, the entire Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo served as the dance ensemble for"Song of Norway,"a Broadway musical based on the life and music of Grieg, with choreography by Balanchine. And Balanchine remained as a resident choreographer for the company, casting Ms. Tallchief in works like “Danses Concertantes,""Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme,""Ballet Imperial” and “Le Baiser de la Fee.”

Balanchine paid increasing attention to Ms. Tallchief, and she became increasingly fond of him, admiring him as a choreographic genius and liking him as a courtly, sophisticated friend. Yet it came as an utter surprise when he asked her to marry him. After careful thought, she agreed, and they were married on Aug. 16, 1946.

It was an unusual marriage. As she wrote in her autobiography: “Passion and romance didn’t play a big part in our married life. We saved our emotions for the classroom.” Yet, she added, “George was a warm, affectionate, loving husband.”

Ms. Tallchief had become a prominent soloist at the Monte Carlo company. But Balanchine wanted a company of his own. In 1946, he and the arts patron Lincoln Kirstein established Ballet Society, which presented a series of subscription performances; it was a direct forerunner of today’s City Ballet.

At the time, Ms. Tallchief was still a member of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, and she remained with it until her contract expired. Then she went to Paris, where Balanchine had agreed to stage productions for the Paris Opera Ballet in 1947. In her autobiography, she speculated that because Balanchine was a Francophile he might have felt tempted to remain in Paris, but that the intrigues riddling the Paris Opera drove him to leave and return to America.

Balanchine then devoted himself to the City Ballet, which gave its first performance under that name on Oct. 11, 1948. Ms. Tallchief was soon acclaimed as one of its stars.

In addition to “Firebird,” Balanchine created many striking roles for her, including those of the Swan Queen in his version of “Swan Lake,” the Sugar Plum Fairy in his version of “The Nutcracker,” Eurydice in"Orpheus"and principal roles in plotless works like “Sylvia Pas de Deux,” “Allegro Brillante,” “Pas de Dix” and “Scotch Symphony.”

After she and Balanchine were divorced in 1950, she remained with City Ballet until 1965. But she also took time off to dance with other companies, and she portrayed Anna Pavlova in"Million Dollar Mermaid,"a 1952 MGM extravaganza starringEsther Williamsas the swimmer and actress Annette Kellerman.

She returned to the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in 1954-55, receiving a salary of $2,000 a week, reportedly the highest salary paid any dancer at that time. When she appeared with American Ballet Theater, in 1960-62, she showed she could be an exponent of dramatic as well as abstract ballets. She was cast in such varied parts as the neurotic title role of Birgit Cullberg’s"Miss Julie” and Caroline, the melancholy heroine of Antony Tudor’s “Jardin aux Lilas,” who must enter into a marriage of convenience with a man she does not love.

At City Ballet, Ms. Tallchief’s partners included André Eglevsky, Erik Bruhn and Nicholas Magallanes. She appeared withRudolf Nureyevon television and on tour in Europe and made guest appearances with Ruth Page’s Chicago Opera Ballet, the San Francisco Ballet, the Royal Danish Ballet and the Hamburg Ballet. One of her last roles was the title role in Peter van Dyk’s “Cinderella” for the Hamburg company in 1966. She retired from the stage soon afterward.

Then Ms. Tallchief became part of dance life in Chicago. She founded the ballet school of the Lyric Opera there in the mid-1970s and was the artistic director of the Chicago City Ballet, which presented its first season in 1981. More successful as a teacher than as a director, she resigned from the post in 1987.

Among her honors, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame and received a Kennedy Center Honor in 1996.

Ms. Tallchief was married to Elmourza Natirboff, an aviator, from 1952 to 1954. In 1956 she married Henry Paschen, who eventually became president of his family’s business, Paschen Contractors, in Chicago.

Besides her daughter, Ms. Paschen, and her sister, her survivors include two grandchildren.

Ms. Tallchief remained closely identified with her Osage lineage long after she found fame and glamour in Paris and New York, and she bridled at the enduring stereotypes and misconceptions many held about American Indians. Recalling her youth in her memoir, she wrote of a dance routine that she and her sister were asked to perform at Oklahoma country fairs, making both of them “self-conscious.”

“It wasn’t remotely authentic,” she wrote. “Traditionally, women didn’t dance in Indian tribal ceremonies. But I had toe shoes on under my moccasins, and we both wore fringed buckskin outfits, headbands with feathers, and bells on our legs. We’d enter from opposite wings, greet each other, and start moving to a tom-tom rhythm.”

The performance ended with Marjorie performing “no-handed back-flip somersaults.”

“In the end,” she added, “we stopped doing the routine because we outgrew the costumes. I was relieved when we put those bells away for good.”"http://www-nc.nytimes.com/2013/04/13...nted=all&_r=6&
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Old 04-14-2013, 06:42 AM   #31
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"Leave It to Beaver" actor Frank Bank, R.I.P.


(from left to right) Tony Dow, Frank Bank & Buddy Hart in "Leave It to Beaver"

in "Leave It to Beaver" - 'Teacher's Daughter'

"Actor Frank Bank died this morning, one day after he turned 71. Today is his friend and former co-star Tony Dow’s 68th birthday.

Bank was primarily know for his role as Clarence “Lumpy” Rutherford on the Leave It to Beaver sitcom in the 1950s and 60s. He reprised his role as Wally Cleaver’s friend in the Still the Beaver TV movie and the 1980s sequel series, The New Leave It to Beaver, joining most of the original sitcom’s surviving cast.

Bank made a brief cameo in the 1997 film Leave It to Beaver as “Frank.”

In addition to Beaver, Bank appeared on several 1950s and 60s TV shows and also played comic book character Archie Andrews in the Life with Archie TV movie in 1962.

His autobiography, Call Me Lumpy: My Leave It To Beaver Days and Other Wild Hollywood Life, was published in 2002 and was currently a bond broker in Los Angeles.

UPDATE: On his Facebook page, Beaver star Jerry Mathers wrote, “I was so sad to hear today of the passing of my dear friend and business associate Frank Bank, who played Lumpy on Leave it to Beaver. He was a character and always kept us laughing. My deepest condolences to Frank’s family.”"http://tvseriesfinale.com/tv-show/le...herford-27831/
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Old 04-15-2013, 04:31 PM   #32
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Japanese actor in "The Burmese Harp"/"Kwaidan," Rentaro Mikuni, R.I.P.


"The Burmese Harp"
"Kwaidan" Trailer

"Active or "strait" hunger movie, such as the series "diary Tsuri Baka" (Rentaro-Mikuni, Masao Sato = Masao Sato real name) Taro Ren Mikuni Miss actor personality that represents Japan minutes for 18:09 am on July 14 We died at a hospital in Tokyo Inagi for acute heart failure. Was 90 years old. Born in Gunma Prefecture.

 According to officials, had been hospitalized since February of last year, he has continued to rehabilitation such as gait training aims to appearance the next movie. 14 morning, the sudden change that condition.

 1951 film debut in "good magic" directed by Keisuke Kinoshita. Introduction "Harp of Burma" after "Strait hunger" (1956) and other social work school (65 years), "in our revenge is" "Martial Law" (1973) (1979), " Rikyu ", etc. (1989), showed an overwhelming presence in the history of cinema. I have also appeared in numerous TV dramas and stage.

 Series "Baka fishing diary" in recent years (88-2009 years), the comical play, "says Sue," the president of the company of fellow fishing hero, played by Toshiyuki Nishida-san, he was popular.

 In 1987 to oversee production and the "white road Shinran", won the Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. "Oishinbo" in (1996), co-starring with Mr. Koichi Sato actor son was in insulating relationship temporary it has become a hot topic. "My mother mentioned" public figure last year was the last of the screen."Google translationhttp://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20...00043-jij-soci
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Old 04-15-2013, 05:04 PM   #33
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Music performer in "Star Trek: First Contact"/"The Big Labowski" and London Symphony Orchestra Conductor, Sir Colin Davis, R.I.P.


Sir Colin Davis conducting the London Symphony Orchestra playing Hector Berlioz's Les Troyens: "Vallon Sonore" which is played in "Star Trek: First Contact"

"Sir Colin Davis, the magisterial conductor whose career with the London Symphony Orchestra spanned over half a century and included 11 years as its principal conductor, died on Sunday.

The London Symphony Orchestra said in a statement that Sir Colin, who served as the orchestra’s president since 2007, died of an unnamed illness on Sunday evening. He was 85.

“Sir Colin’s role in British musical life was immense,” the orchestra said in its statement. “He was internationally renowned for his interpretations of Mozart, Sibelius and Berlioz, and music lovers across the world have been inspired by his performances and recordings.”

Colin Rex Davis was born in Surrey, England, on Sept. 25, 1927.

Though he had always dreamed of being a conductor, his rise in the profession was not swift. His skill on the piano was wanting, as was, he admitted, his desire to play it. He was appointed as assistant conductor of the BBC Scottish Symphony in 1957 after three attempts for the job.


By his own admission, he was hot-headed and short-tempered in his younger years, and his relationships with musicians and musical organizations early in his career were often tempestuous. Though he made his debut with the London Symphony in 1959, it would be decades before he truly made his mark. In 1965, the London Symphony turned him down as chief conductor.

For the next several years, first as chief conductor of the BBC Symphony, then as music director for the Royal Opera House, his career advanced slowly.

It was not until 1992, with his masterful interpretation of the Sibelius cycle with the London Symphony, that his authority became apparent and his fame began to spread. Three years later, he was made principal conductor of the London Symphony, a position he held until 2006, when Valery Gergiev took his place.

His mark on the institution was indelible. He championed Sibelius and Berlioz, whose major works he conducted in full with the London Symphony in 1999 and 2000. He also revived Mozart as a symphonic mainstay after a long absence. In 1997, he took the London Symphony to New York to conduct its first residency at Lincoln Center. He was principal guest conductor of the New York Philharmonic from 1998 to 2003.

He received two Grammy awards for his recording of Berlioz’s Les Troyens with the London Symphony Orchestra in 2002, and another in 2006 for Verdi’s Falstaff.

Though age had slowed his pace in recent years, at the podium he radiated a vigor and passion for his craft to the end.

Anthony Tommasini, the New York Times classical music critic, wrote that when Sir Colin took the podium to conduct the Berlioz Requiem in London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral last June, he “looked a little frail.”

“But once he settled into his tall, swiveling conductor’s chair, he exuded authority and stamina and drew a radiant, angelic and at times terrifying account of this challenging score from the orchestra and chorus.”

There was no immediate word on survivors. Sir Colin’s wife, Shamsi, died in 2010 after nearly half a century of marriage. The couple had five children, and he had two children with his first wife, April Cantelo, the BBC reported.

Toward the end of his life, Sir Colin had become something of a sage in the world of classical music, wont to puff on his pipe and knit in quiet introspection.

”Conductors,” he once said in an interview with The New York Times, ”are paid to think, and that’s what the job should be about: sitting at home thinking, what is this piece? How can I set it up to sound its best and live on, because there’s nothing to replace it with just yet? This is what absorbs the mind. Especially in old age.”"http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/20...or-dies-at-85/
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Old 04-15-2013, 05:32 PM   #34
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Fantastic thread rkolinski, I have never heard of Besedka Johnson or the movie Starlet but will definitely track it down if it has been released on blu-ray.
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Old 04-15-2013, 05:59 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ KNIGHT XIII View Post
Fantastic thread rkolinski, I have never heard of Besedka Johnson or the movie Starlet but will definitely track it down if it has been released on blu-ray.
THANKS! Nice to be appreciated for a thread which a few members find to be depressing. BTW, here is a link to that "Starlet" movie available on BD https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Starlet-Blu-ray/64806/.
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Old 04-23-2013, 06:08 PM   #36
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The "Danish Bardot," Vivi Bach, R.I.P.



appearing in a bikini in "Tausend Takte Ubermut" (1965), a German musical comedy

"The woman is pretty, the wise man - in front of the camera were the roles of Vivi Bach and Dietmar Schönherr, since 1965, the private German television liierten dream couple. The late sixties, the social upheavals had reached the entertainment, Grandpa television should give way, a wish was born. With this show they would "cut off old habits," the Austrians Schoenherr said right at the beginning.

His wife Vivi, a native of Denmark baker's daughter, singer and actress smiled as co-host to well-behaved. In Germany stream by rolling in was The Adventures of Count Bobby , the TV series Space Patrol (next Schönherr) and hits such as "All men are predators" become known. Wünsch Dir was then followed rather the line from the common Bach Schoenherr song "Come to the Molotov cocktail party and bring 'ne bag with dynamite."

The dynamite that were to sink into this incident the next candidates in transparent blouses or the idea of ​​a family live in the car. The station chose a British model, opening the handles succeeded the candidate immediately - even the television audience held its breath. The winner was decided at home, for example, the light switch.

Bach moderation achievement was to get the watt rating for the candidates in the municipal electricity works. More emancipation was not. After 24 episodes, the show was canceled in 1972, the Austrians had interpreted a carnation in the buttonhole Schönherr's recommendation to vote for the Social Democrats. That was too much. The future belonged Kulenkampff and Carrell.

Schoenherr, who had Bach met when they wanted to put an unsuccessful own film production on its feet with her ​​first husband was a moderator of the talk show, later The later it succeed. Vivi Bach, however, failed with the WDR specially tailored to their personality show, 1976 he took one last drive to and from then focused on their role as "the wife of".

Not easy, because her husband had abused at least since President Reagan as "*******" [spelled out word A Hole] was the "guerrilla media" no longer suffered probably everywhere. The once illustrated as "Danish Bardot" Bach Children's Books praised and supported Schönherr charitable projects. In the nineties, the couple moved to Ibiza back. There Vivi Bach died on Monday in the apartment where they lived with the now 86-year-old Schoenherr. She was 73 years old."[Google translation]http://www.sueddeutsche.de/medien/zu...amit-1.1656902
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:14 PM   #37
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Academy Award recognized Argentine screenwriter, Aida Bortnik, R.I.P.


"The Official Story" Trailer

"The writer and journalist, wrote the screenplay for the film "The Truce" also nominated for an Oscar in 1975, died after a long illness in this city. Spokesmen for the Film Academy of Argentina informed the wake Telam Bortnik takes place at the funeral home located at Acevedo 1120, will run until tomorrow morning but it is unclear where his remains will be interred. Bortnik was born in Buenos Aires on January 7, 1938 and from 1972 he served as author of scripts television, film and theater: he worked as a journalist for the magazine Primera Plana and La Opinión, between 1967 and 1976, when it was forced into exile in Spain. Committed to social and political reality in the 70 displayed his passion in theater and After his exile, about the end of the last dictatorship, was one of the creators of Open Theater, movement had great influence in society and in which playwrights and directors participated as Osvaldo Dragun and Roberto Cossa and actors like Norma Aleandro and Pepe Soriano. also served in the Seven days and Panorama magazine, and was also an author of storybooks. cinema was the space that gave most satisfaction and which exploited his talent. After beginning in 1971 as a television writer, wrote with director Sergio Renan in 1974 the script for "The Truce", based on the novel by Uruguayan Mario Benedetti. Argentina was the first film nominated for an Oscar in 1975, but lost to "Amarcord" by Federico Fellini. That year also Bortnik co-wrote "A Woman", directed by Juan José Stagnaro. wrote in 1985 with director Luis Puenzo the script of the iconic "The Official Story", a film that denounced the atrocities of the military regime that devastated Argentina since 1976. The film also met with Hector Alterio and Norma Aleandro in leading roles who had participated in "The Truce". "official history" led to the popularity and win the Fame in Hollywood and Cannes, as it was an international hit in 1986 which won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film and the award for Best Actress for Norma Aleandro in the Cannes Film Festival. Bortnik Meanwhile obtained a nomination for Best Writing, Screenplay created directly for the screen. That year, Bortnik worked with director Raul de la Torre on the script of "Poor Butterfly" and then emerged as the first Latin American writer to be appointed permanent member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Hollywood, which awards the Oscars. In 1989 he wrote the dialogues of "Old Gringo" American film directed by Puenzo and based on the novel by Carlos Fuentes, which has as its backdrop the Mexican Revolution is starring Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck. was also author of the screenplays for "Grow blow", "Back" and director of the trilogy composed Marcelo Piña "fierce Tango" (1993), "Wild Horses" ( 1995) and "Ashes of Paradise" (1997). gave workshops in 2010 at home script with director Juan Jose Campanella, another winner of an Oscar for "The Secret in Their Eyes" in 2010. "Today died Aida Bortnik . Writer of 'The Official Story' among many others. One of my great teachers of life, "said Campanella in social networks, synthesizing the feeling generated by the loss of one of the key voices of Argentine cinema of the 70s and 80s. Possessing a personal style and strongly linked transferable at that time and the aesthetic that sought to narrate, Bortnik leaves a void at the time to show a possible way to tell so popular committed while outgoing events of his place and time." http://www.telam.com.ar/notas/201304/15716-ltimo-adios-a-la-guionista-aida-bortnik.html

Roger Ebert review of "The Official Story"

"Five years after the arrival of her adopted daughter, Alicia finds herself asking some questions. Where, exactly, did the little girl come from? Was she indeed obtained through the normal adoption channels in Argentina, as her husband insists, or was she stolen from a mother who was a political prisoner? Is the real mother still alive? Is it moral for her to ignore those questions, just because she loves her adopted daughter so much?

These are the heartbreaking dilemmas of "The Official Story," a film that deals with the turmoil in Argentina through the story of a single family. Alicia is married to Roberto, a wealthy, powerful man with connections in industry and government. Her life centers around their adopted daughter. She is vaguely aware of some of the unhappy realities of recent Argentinean politics - the roundups of leftists and opponents of the government, who became "missing persons" and were presumably killed in a secret holocaust. But until Ana, an old high school friend, reenters her life, Alicia does not understand how those events might affect her.

At first Ana does not want to talk about the experiences she has been through. But then she begins to reopen her wounds. She tells Alicia that her lover was a leftist opponent of the government. After her lover disappeared, Ana was taken captive by the government and tortured for information about his whereabouts. She could tell them nothing. Eventually, she was released.

Ana's story makes Alicia uncomfortable. She tells her husband about it, but he dismisses it as rumor and invention. Alicia begins to realize that her husband may be part of the repressive establishment. One day, walking downtown, she comes across a demonstration by family members of the missing. She hears stories that some of the prisoners were pregnant, and that their children were taken away at birth. Could that be the story of her own daughter? In one of the most powerful scenes in the movie, she takes down the clothing her daughter came dressed in, and touches it gently, and we can read her mind: She is thinking that her daughter's natural mother was the person who put these clothes on the baby girl.

"The Official Story" is part polemic, part thriller, part tragedy. It belongs on the list with films like "Z," "Missing" and "El Norte," which examine the human aspects of political unrest. It is a movie that asks some very hard questions. Should Alicia search for the real mother of her daughter? Is her own love no less real? What would be "best" for the little girl?

Alicia meets an old woman who may, or may not, be the grandmother of the adopted daughter. The two women become close, in a strange way. Political arrogance and heartlessness may have taken a child from one family and assigned it to another, but at some deep and fundamental level, these two women understand each other. Both of them are made to face the reality of losing a daughter, and although they should be enemies, they find strength from each other. The way this particular relationship is developed is one of the wonders of this film, and provides its emotional center, as love and honor try to find a way to exist in the face of official cruelty.

Alicia is played in the movie by Norma Aleandro, whose performance won the best actress award at this year's Cannes Film Festival. It is a performance that will be hard to forget, particularly since so much of it is internal. Some of the key moments in the film come as we watch Aleandro and realize what must be taking place inside her mind, and inside her conscience. Most political films play outside the countries that they are about; "The Official Story" is now actually playing in Argentina, where it must be almost unbearably painful for some of the members of its audiences. It was almost as painful for me."
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Old 05-01-2013, 01:59 PM   #38
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"Winnipeg's Sweetheart," singer, and actress, Deanna Durbin, R.I.P.



Singing "Ave Maria" with the Vienna Boys Choir
Singing "Begin the Beguine" in the 1943 film "Hers to Hold"
starring in "Spring Parade" (1940)

"Deanna Durbin, who as a plucky child movie star with a sweet soprano voice charmed American audiences during the Depression and saved Universal Pictures from bankruptcy before she vanished from public view 64 years ago, has died, a fan club announced on Tuesday. She was 91.

In a newsletter, the Deanna Durbin Society said Ms. Durbin died “a few days ago,” quoting her son, Peter H. David, who thanked her admirers for respecting her privacy. No other details were given.

Ms. Durbin had remained determinedly out of public view since 1949, when she retired to a village in France with her third husband.

From 1936 to 1942, Ms. Durbin was everyone’s intrepid kid sister or spunky daughter, a wholesome, radiant, can-do girl who in a series of wildly popular films was always fixing the problems of unhappy adults.

And as an instant Hollywood star with her very first movie, “Three Smart Girls,” she almost single-handedly fixed the problems of her fretting bosses at Universal, bringing them box-office gold.

In 1946, Ms. Durbin’s salary of $323,477 from Universal made her the second-highest-paid woman in America, just $5,000 behind Bette Davis.

Her own problems began when she outgrew the role that had brought her fame. Critics responded negatively to her attempts to be an adult on screen, as a prostitute in love with a killer in Robert Siodmak’s bleak film noir “Christmas Holiday” (1944) and as a debutante mixed up in a murder plot in “Lady on a Train” (1945.)

The child-star persona affected her personal life as well.

“When my first marriage failed, everyone said that I could never divorce. It would ruin the ‘image,’ ” she told Robert Shipman in Films and Filming magazine in 1983. “How could anybody really think that I was going to spend the rest of my life with a man I found I didn’t love, just for the sake of an ‘image’?”

The man was Vaughn Paul, an assistant director, whom she had married at 19 in 1941. The marriage lasted two years. Her second marriage, to Felix Jackson, the 43-year-old producer of several of her films, also ended in divorce, after the birth of a daughter.

The third marriage was a success: in 1950, at 28, she married Charles David, the 44-year-old French director of “Lady on a Train.” After starring in 21 feature films, she retired to a French farmhouse.

“I hated being in a goldfish bowl,” she said.

Edna Mae Durbin was born on Dec. 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and grew up in Southern California, where she studied singing. She was discovered by an MGM casting director searching Los Angeles singing schools for someone to portray the opera star Ernestine Schumann-Heink as a child.

Signed by the studio at 13, Ms. Durbin, who already possessed a mature coloratura soprano, soon appeared in a one-reel short, “Every Sunday,” with another recently signed 13-year-old, Judy Garland, who sang swing while Ms. Durbin sang classical music.

Her MGM career ended suddenly, however, when Schumann-Heink, who was to play herself as an adult in the movie about her life, died at 75 and the studio did not pick up Ms. Durbin’s option. Shortly afterward she moved to Universal, shepherded there by Rufus Le Maire, a former MGM executive who had switched his allegiance to the rival studio.

Ms. Durbin was quickly handed to Joe Pasternak, who produced her first 10 movies, and to Henry Koster, who directed six of them: “Three Smart Girls,” “One Hundred Men and a Girl,” “Three Smart Girls Grow Up,” “First Love,” “Spring Parade” and “It Started With Eve.”

In his autobiography, “Easy the Hard Way,” Mr. Pasternak — who would eventually move to MGM and build the careers of two other coloratura sopranos, Kathryn Grayson and Jane Powell — said that stardom was always “a matter of chemistry between the public and the player” and that no one could take credit for discovering Deanna Durbin.

“You can’t hide that kind of light under a bushel,” he wrote. “You just can’t, even if you try.”

Ms. Durbin, who was originally to have ninth billing in “Three Smart Girls,” became the movie’s star when studio executives saw the first rushes. About the same time, in 1936, she began singing on Eddie Cantor’s popular weekly radio program.

In 1938 there was a nationwide search to choose the young man who would give Ms. Durbin her first screen kiss in the movie “First Love.” (Robert Stack was the actor chosen.) She was given a special miniature 1938 Academy Award for her “significant contribution in bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth.”

In movie after movie Ms. Durbin’s character found a way to help the struggling grown-ups in her life: reuniting her divorced parents, persuading the conductor Leopold Stokowski to help her out-of-work musician father, cajoling a stranger into becoming her father for a day.

Many of the films were Depression fairy tales in which Ms. Durbin won over or defeated silly rich people with the help of butlers, cooks and chauffeurs, who often risked their jobs to aid her.

After moving to France in 1949 and settling outside Paris in the village of Neauphle-le-Château, Ms. Durbin devoted most of her time to keeping her home, cooking and raising her children. In addition to Peter, her son from her marriage to Mr. David, Ms. Durbin had a daughter, Jessica, from her second marriage. Mr. David died in 1999, a few months before their 50th wedding anniversary.

Mr. David once said that he and Ms. Durbin had made a deal that he would protect her “from spiders, mosquitoes and reporters.”

Ms. Durbin, who gave almost no interviews after she left Hollywood, did send reporters a letter in 1958 that read in part: “I was a typical 13-year-old American girl. The character I was forced into had little or nothing in common with myself — or with other youth of my generation, for that matter. I could never believe that my contemporaries were my fans. They may have been impressed with my ‘success.’ but my fans were the parents, many of whom could not cope with their own youngsters. They sort of adopted me as their ‘perfect’ daughter.”

In the letter, which was excerpted in some newspapers, she also wrote: “I was never happy making pictures. I’ve gained weight. I do my own shopping, bring up my two children and sing an hour every day.”"http://www-nc.nytimes.com/2013/05/01...nted=all&_r=6&
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Old 05-02-2013, 03:14 AM   #39
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"The China Syndrome" writter, Mike Gray, R.I.P.


"The China Syndrome" Trailer

"We received word Wednesday that Mike Gray, probably best known in the drug reform community as the author of "Drug Crazy: How We Got in this Mess and How We Can Get Out," has died.

Mike Gray, RIPA fixture at drug reform conferences for the last decade, Gray had been a staunch advocate of ending drug prohibition and had worked with Robert Field at Common Sense for Drug Policy to publicize the abuses of the drug war and assist local activists seeking reform.

Born in 1935 in Darlington, Indiana, Gray received an engineering degree from Purdue University, but found his life's work in documenting political violence as a filmmaker. He was a cofounder of the Chicago-based Film Group, a pioneering collection of documentary filmmakers whose works included "The Murder of Fred Hampton," the Chicago Black Panther leader gunned down by police in 1969. Gray's iconic coverage of the police riots at the 1968 Chicago Democratic convention were seen around the world.

Gray moved to Los Angeles in 1973, where he expanded his creative endeavors to include screenwriting credits for four-time Oscar nominated "The China Syndrome" and other films, for episodes of "Star Trek: The Next Generation," as well as a number of books. His written work addressed issues such as the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island and the use of the death penalty, as well as drug reform. In addition to "Drug Crazy," Gray returned to the issue of drug policy with "Busted: Stone Cowboys, Narco-Lords, and Washington’s War on Drugs."

Gray won the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Drama and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, and for the BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay.

Your reporter conversed briefly with Gray at the California NORML conference in January. He didn't appear to be in ill health; his death comes as a shock, if not a surprise, given his age. He will be missed."http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/...rug_reformer_m
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:56 PM   #40
doctorD doctorD is offline
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Default Chris Kelly of Kris Kross

The "Mac Daddy" half of Kris Kross Chris Kelly has passed away at the age of 34. Those not familiar with the name may remember the song Jump...Jump (see video below). Link to announcement


Last edited by doctorD; 05-02-2013 at 06:04 PM.
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